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Matti Narkia

Mango effective in preventing, stopping certain colon, breast cancer cells - 2 views

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    "COLLEGE STATION - Mango. If you know little about this fruit, understand this: It's been found to prevent or stop certain colon and breast cancer cells in the lab.

    That's according to a new study by Texas AgriLife Research food scientists, who examined the five varieties most common in the U.S.: Kent, Francine, Ataulfo, Tommy/Atkins and Haden.

    Though the mango is an ancient fruit heavily consumed in many parts of the world, little has been known about its health aspects. The National Mango Board commissioned a variety of studies with several U.S. researchers to help determine its nutritional value.

    "If you look at what people currently perceive as a superfood, people think of high antioxidant capacity, and mango is not quite there," said Dr. Susanne Talcott, who with her husband, Dr. Steve Talcott, conducted the study on cancer cells. "In comparison with antioxidants in blueberry, acai and pomegranate, it's not even close."

    But the team checked mango against cancer cells anyway, and found it prevented or stopped cancer growth in certain breast and colon cell lines, Susanne Talcott noted.

    "It has about four to five times less antioxidant capacity than an average wine grape, and it still holds up fairly well in anticancer activity. If you look at it from the physiological and nutritional standpoint, taking everything together, it would be a high-ranking super food," she said. "It would be good to include mangoes as part of the regular diet."

    The Talcotts tested mango polyphenol extracts in vitro on colon, breast, lung, leukemia and prostate cancers. Polyphenols are natural substances in plants and are associated with a variety of compounds known to promote good health."
Matti Narkia

Unexpected Perks of Coffee Consumption - The Early Show - CBS News - 0 views

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    "(CBS) Your daily cup of java may deliver some unexpected health benefits. Studies have shown it may lower your risk for Type II diabetes and certain types of cancer (colon, mouth and throat), and protect against heart disease and cavities.

    Dr. Alanna Levine, a primary care physician, said on "The Early Show" researchers aren't sure exactly why coffee has these benefits, but speculated that perhaps the coffee has antioxidant properties. "
Matti Narkia

Omega-3s help stave off age-related vision loss | Reuters - 1 views

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    "NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Want to keep your eyesight sharp as you age? Eating lots of fish packed with healthy omega-3 fatty acids could help, new research suggests.

    Among 1,837 people who had early signs of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), those with the highest consumption of omega-3 fatty acids were 30 percent less likely to progress to the advanced form of the disease over a 12-year period than those with the lowest omega-3 intake, researchers found."
Matti Narkia

Green Leafy Veggies, Coloured Fruits Boost Vision - 0 views

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    "Carotenoids, found in green leafy vegetables and colored fruits, boost visual performance and may prevent age-related eye diseases, says a new study.

    The study has been published in the Journal of Food Science, published by the Institute of Food Technologists.

    To reach the conclusion, authors from the University of Georgia compiled the results of multiple studies on the effects of the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin on visual performance. These carotenoids play an important role in human vision, including a positive impact on the retina.

    After reviewing the various studies, the authors concluded that macular pigments, such as lutein and zeaxanthin do have an effect on visual performance. Lutein and zeaxanthin can reduce disability and discomfort from glare, enhance contrast, and reduce photostress recovery times. They can also reduce glare from light absorption and increase the visual range. "
Matti Narkia

Fat Hormone May Protect Against Alzheimer's - 0 views

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    "High blood levels of leptin, a hormone that regulates appetite, may guard against Alzheimer's disease, new research suggests.

    "Hopefully, in 10 or 15 years this may be one of many agents that we use to reduce the risk of Alzheimer's disease," said senior study author Dr. Sudha Seshadri, an associate professor of neurology at Boston University School of Medicine. "Or it may be one of many markers that we measure in combination to predict risk."

    But many more studies of different population groups are needed to determine whether leptin can play such a pivotal role in predicting the risk of Alzheimer's, Seshadri said.

    The research, which was reported in the Dec. 16 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, was done because "there has been some data relating body weight to the risk of Alzheimer's disease," Seshadri said. "When we looked at animal studies, we found some data to indicate that leptin not only produces a feeling of satiety but also has a beneficial effect on the hippocampus. It was important to see if that was true in humans."

    The hippocampus is a portion of the brain that plays a role in important aspects of memory."
Matti Narkia

Cholesterol-Fighting Drugs Show Wider Benefit - New York Times - 0 views

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    CHART: Statins Reduce Risks: A study of 18,000 people with high levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, found that the risk of a heart attack or stroke was cut in half among those who took a statin. The study was stopped after two years, but some participants were tracked for up to five years. (Sources: Dr. Paul M. Ridker; New England Journal of Medicine) (pg.A21)
    A large new study suggests that millions more people could benefit from taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins, even if they have low cholesterol, because the drugs can significantly lower their risk of heart attacks, strokes and death.

    The study, involving nearly 18,000 people worldwide, tested statin treatment in men 50 and older and in women 60 and older who did not have high cholesterol or histories of heart disease. What they did have was high levels of a protein called high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, or CRP, which indicates inflammation in the body.
Matti Narkia

JUPITER: Primary-prevention statin therapy in women cuts cardiovascular risk in half - ... - 0 views

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    "November 25, 2009 | Michael O'Riordan

    Orlando, FL - Treating healthy women with low LDL cholesterol but elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels with rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) cuts their risk of cardiovascular events in half, according to a new analysis of Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER).

    The reduction in risk is consistent with the reduction observed in the overall trial, and with the 42% benefit observed in men.
Matti Narkia

JUPITER: Low LDL and low CRP best for reducing events in primary prevention - theheart.org - 0 views

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    "March 29, 2009 | Michael O'Riordan

    Orlando, FL - Reducing LDL cholesterol and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in primary-prevention patients treated with rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) results in better event-free survival than when neither of these targets are achieved or when LDL cholesterol alone is reduced, a new analysis shows [1].

    Presenting the results of the Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) study during an afternoon press conference at the American College of Cardiology 2009 Scientific Sessions, investigators say that initial interventions for low-risk primary-prevention patients remains lifestyle and dietary modifications, but for those choosing drug therapy, "reductions in both LDL cholesterol and hs-CRP are indicators of the success of treatment with statin therapy.""
Matti Narkia

Drinking coffee, decaf and tea regularly associated with a reduced risk of diabetes - 0 views

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    "Rachel Huxley, D.Phil, of The George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues identified 18 studies involving 457,922 participants and assessing the association between coffee consumption and diabetes risk published between 1966 and 2009.

    Six studies involving 225,516 individuals also included information about decaffeinated coffee, whereas seven studies with 286,701 participants reported on tea consumption.

    When the authors combined and analyzed the data, they found that each additional cup of coffee consumed in a day was associated with a 7 percent reduction in the excess risk of diabetes.

    Individuals who drank three to four cups per day had an approximately 25 percent lower risk than those who drank between zero and two cups per day.

    Rachel Huxley, D.Phil, of The George Institute for International Health, University of Sydney, Australia, and colleagues identified 18 studies involving 457,922 participants and assessing the association between coffee consumption and diabetes risk published between 1966 and 2009.

    Six studies involving 225,516 individuals also included information about decaffeinated coffee, whereas seven studies with 286,701 participants reported on tea consumption.

    When the authors combined and analyzed the data, they found that each additional cup of coffee consumed in a day was associated with a 7 percent reduction in the excess risk of diabetes.

    Individuals who drank three to four cups per day had an approximately 25 percent lower risk than those who drank between zero and two cups per day."
Matti Narkia

How this horrible weather could give you heart disease | Mail Online - 1 views

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    "We are fond of grumbling about Britain's grey skies, but there may be a good medical reason for doing so. It seems the dreary weather is bad for our hearts - worse, even, than raised cholesterol and an unhealthy diet.

    That's the controversial claim being made by Dr David Grimes, a gastroenterologist from Blackburn. He's been gazing at the sky for 20 years for clues about why his patients get more sick than those in the south of the country.

    And what he's found turns key assumptions about heart disease on their head. 'It's not diet or cholesterol levels that raise your risk of heart disease,' he claims. 'It's where you live. People in the north are more likely to be ill because they get less sunshine

    Basically they are suffering from 'latitude' sickness. The link is vitamin D. While we get some from our diet, the main source is the sun - sunlight converts a compound in the skin into vitamin D, so the amount you make is directly related to the amount of sunshine you get.

    In a new book Dr Grimes argues the higher the level of vitamin D in your blood, the lower your risk of heart disease and a range of other illnesses.

    If he's right, what we need is not diet and lifestyle advice, but food fortified with vitamin D. For years the vitamin was thought to be useful only for preventing rickets.

    So how does he treat them? 'You can do it with diet,' he says 'One Bangladeshi woman eats oily fish every day and now has a vitamin D blood level of 40. 'We give supplements of 1,000 international units (IU) a day or we can give an injection of 300,000 IU that lasts for a year.

    'The patients respond well,' says Grimes 'but what's needed is a proper controlled, long-term trial and who is going to fund that? Not a drug company.'"
Matti Narkia

Massive vitamin-D/omega-3 trial in the works - theheart.org - 0 views

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    "June 29, 2009 | Shelley Wood

    Boston, MA - A massive, National Institutes of Health-sponsored study looking at whether vitamin-D and/or omega-3 fatty-acid supplementation can reduce the risk of developing heart disease, stroke, or cancer will get under way in January 2010, according to a website for the study. Drs JoAnn Manson and Julie Buring (Harvard Medical School/ Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA) will head up the Vitamin D and Omega-3 Trial (VITAL).

    The study is aiming to enroll 20 000 men and women, one-quarter of whom will be black. According to a Brigham and Women's Hospital press release, the study is intentionally aiming to illuminate a potential racial and ethnic disparity hypothesized to be linked to vitamin D [1]. "African Americans have a higher risk of vitamin-D deficiency as well as a greater frequency of diabetes, hypertension, and certain types of cancer," a press release notes. For VITAL, women need to be over age 65 to enter the study; men need to be over age 60.

    Study participants will be randomized to one of four groups: daily vitamin D (2000 IU) and fish oil (1 g); daily vitamin D and fish-oil placebo; daily vitamin-D placebo and fish oil; or daily vitamin-D placebo and fish-oil placebo. The trial will run for five years and is expected to cost US $20 million."
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D: A potential role in cardiovascular disease prevention - theheart.org - 0 views

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    "November 24, 2009 | Lisa Nainggolan

    Orlando, FL - Inadequate levels of vitamin D are associated with an increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease and death, a new observational study has found. Dr Tami L Bair (Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, UT) reported the findings here at the American Heart Association 2009 Scientific Sessions.

    Bair and colleagues followed more than 27 000 people 50 years or older with no history of cardiovascular disease for just over a year and found that those with very low levels of vitamin D (<15 ng />30 ng/mL). Those deficient in vitamin D were also twice as likely to develop heart failure as those with normal levels.

    "We concluded that even a moderate deficiency of vitamin D was associated with developing coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and death," said coauthor Dr Heidi May (Intermountain Medical Center). However, "it is not known whether this is a cause and effect relationship," she told heartwire. Because this study was observational, more research is needed "to better establish the association between vitamin D deficiency and cardiovascular disease," she noted."
Matti Narkia

Lack of vitamin D may increase heart disease risk - 0 views

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    "DALLAS, Jan. 8 - The same vitamin D deficiency that can result in weak bones now has been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, Framingham Heart Study researchers report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

    "Vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased cardiovascular risk, above and beyond established cardiovascular risk factors," said Thomas J. Wang, M.D., assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Mass. "The higher risk associated with vitamin D deficiency was particularly evident among individuals with high blood pressure."

    In a study of 1,739 offspring from Framingham Heart Study participants (average age 59, all Caucasian), researchers found that those with blood levels of vitamin D below15 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL) had twice the risk of a cardiovascular event such as a heart attack, heart failure or stroke in the next five years compared to those with higher levels of vitamin D."
Matti Narkia

Japan EPA Lipid Intervention Study (JELIS) - Дискуссионный Клуб Русского Меди... - 0 views

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    "18 645 patients with a total cholesterol of 6·5 mmol/L or greater were recruited from local physicians throughout Japan between 1996 and 1999. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either 1800 mg of EPA daily with statin (EPA group; n=9326) or statin only (controls; n=9319) with a 5-year follow-up. The primary endpoint was any major coronary event, including sudden cardiac death, fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, and other non-fatal events including unstable angina pectoris, angioplasty, stenting, or coronary artery bypass grafting. Analysis was by intention-to-treat.
    Findings
    At mean follow-up of 4·6 years, we detected the primary endpoint in 262 (2·8%) patients in the EPA group and 324 (3·5%) in controls-a 19% relative reduction in major coronary events (p=0·011). Post-treatment LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased 25%, from 4·7 mmol/L in both groups. Serum LDL cholesterol was not a significant factor in a reduction of risk for major coronary events. Unstable angina and non-fatal coronary events were also significantly reduced in the EPA group. Sudden cardiac death and coronary death did not differ between groups. In patients with a history of coronary artery disease who were given EPA treatment, major coronary events were reduced by 19% (secondary prevention subgroup: 158 [8·7%] in the EPA group vs 197 [10·7%] in the control group; p=0·048). In patients with no history of coronary artery disease, EPA treatment reduced major coronary events by 18%, but this finding was not significant (104 [1·4%] in the EPA group vs 127 [1·7%] in the control group; p=0·132)."
Matti Narkia

JELIS - Japan Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) Lipid Intervention Study - Medscape - 0 views

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    The first large-scale, prospective, randomized trial of combined treatment with a statin and an omega-3 fatty acid originally derived from fish, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), has shown that the addition of EPA to statin therapy provides additional benefit in preventing major coronary events, apparently through lipid-independent mechanisms.[1] The Japan eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) Lipid Intervention Study (JELIS) tested the effects of long-term use of EPA 1800 mg/day in addition to a statin in Japanese patients with hypercholesterolemia. The results add support to previous evidence of the beneficial effect of omega-3 fatty acids in patients with known coronary heart disease, and show that that effect can extend the benefit of statins, the JELIS investigators believe
Matti Narkia

JELIS: Adding fish oil to low-dose statin therapy reduces major coronary events - thehe... - 0 views

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    "Nov 14, 2005 | Michael O'Riordan.
    Dallas, TX - The addition of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) to low-dose statin therapy significantly reduced the incidence of major coronary events, largely driven by a reduction in unstable angina, when compared with patients taking statins alone. A subgroup analysis of the study, which involved a large number of primary-prevention patients, revealed that statin-treated secondary-prevention patients gained the most benefit from fish-oil supplementation.

    Dr Mitsuhiro Yokoyama
    Presenting the results of the Japan EPA Lipid Intervention Study (JELIS) during the late-breaking clinical-trials session at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2005, Dr Mitsuhiro Yokoyama (Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan) said that the mechanism of benefit with EPA, a seafood-based, long-chain, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, appears to be unrelated to the effects of cholesterol lowering.

    Commenting on the results of the study for heartwire, Dr Lawrence Appel (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD) said the findings are impressive given that the benefit of fish oil was observed on top of a regimen of statin therapy. He added that there are still some unknowns about which patient population would benefit most from fish oil."
Matti Narkia

ACS :: Vitamin D Has Role in Colon Cancer Prevention - 0 views

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    "Vitamin D may be more important to colon cancer prevention than previously believed, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (Vol. 290, No. 22: 2959-2967).

    The study examined people with no symptoms of colon cancer to determine what role diet, exercise, smoking, and other behaviors played in the development or not of colon polyps, small growths in the colon that can turn into cancer if they aren't removed."
Matti Narkia

Omega 3 fatty acids from fish oil, HF treatment, and prevention - 0 views

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    "In one room on the last day of the conference, four invited faculty members meticulously made the case for an already-available substance as an example of the kind of agent the others were looking for. Their message: omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), usually derived from fish oil, garner far less attention as a heart-failure therapy than they deserve, given the wealth of laboratory and clinical evidence supporting a treatment effect."
Matti Narkia

Christiane Northrup, MD: Protect Your Breasts With Vitamin D - 0 views

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    "A study conducted by Cedric Garland and other prominent vitamin D researchers determined that women with vitamin D levels above 52 ng/ml have half the risk of developing breast cancer as those with 13 ng/ml! Garland (et al) estimates that 58,000 new cases of breast cancer in the U.S. could be prevented per year by raising vitamin D levels to 52 ng/ml. Imagine what the global impact could be! "
Matti Narkia

Over 65? Take lots of vitamin D to prevent a fall: MedlinePlus - 0 views

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    "NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Important news for seniors: A daily dose of vitamin D cuts your risk of falling substantially, researchers reported today.

    But not just any dose will do. "It takes 700 to 1000 international units (IU) of vitamin D per day and nothing less will work," Dr. Heike A. Bischoff-Ferrari, who directs the Center on Aging and Mobility at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, noted in an email to Reuters Health.

    Those recommendations - which are higher than those by the U.S. Institute of Medicine -- are based on the results of eight studies that looked at vitamin D supplements for fall prevention among more than 2,400 adults aged 65 and older. Falls were not notably reduced with daily doses of vitamin D lower than 700 IU.

    An analysis of all eight studies, posted online today in the British Medical Journal, add weight to several others which have shown that vitamin D improves strength and balance, and bone health in the elderly, the researchers note."
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