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Matti Narkia

Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention (ASAP) study: a randomized tr... - 0 views

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    Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention (ASAP) study: a randomized trial of the effect of vitamins E and C on 3-year progression of carotid atherosclerosis.
    Salonen JT, Nyyssönen K, Salonen R, Lakka HM, Kaikkonen J, Porkkala-Sarataho E, Voutilainen S, Lakka TA, Rissanen T, Leskinen L, Tuomainen TP, Valkonen VP, Ristonmaa U, Poulsen HE.
    J Intern Med. 2000 Nov;248(5):377-86.
    PMID: 11123502
    DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2796.2000.00752.x

    Conclusions. Our study shows that a combined supplementation with reasonable doses of both vitamin E and slow-release vitamin C can retard the progression of common carotid atherosclerosis in men. This may imply benefits with regard to other atherosclerosis-based events.
Matti Narkia

Six-Year Effect of Combined Vitamin C and E Supplementation on Atherosclerotic Progress... - 0 views

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    Six-year effect of combined vitamin C and E supplementation on atherosclerotic progression: the Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention (ASAP) Study.
    Salonen RM, Nyyssönen K, Kaikkonen J, Porkkala-Sarataho E, Voutilainen S, Rissanen TH, Tuomainen TP, Valkonen VP, Ristonmaa U, Lakka HM, Vanharanta M, Salonen JT, Poulsen HE; Antioxidant Supplementation in Atherosclerosis Prevention Study.
    Circulation. 2003 Feb 25;107(7):947-53.
    PMID: 12600905
    doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000050626.25057.51

    Conclusions- These data replicate our 3-year findings confirming that the supplementation with combination of vitamin E and slow-release vitamin C slows down atherosclerotic progression in hypercholesterolemic persons.
Matti Narkia

Omega-3 rather than genetics is key to lack of CHD in Japanese? - theheart.org - 0 views

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    Pittsburgh, PA and Shiga, Japan - The low rate of atherosclerosis and heart disease in Japanese people may be related to their very high levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids rather than genetic factors, a new study suggests [1].

    The study, published in the August 5, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (available online July 28), was conducted by a group led by Dr Akira Sekikawa (University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan).

    They found that compared with white or Japanese American men living in the US, Japanese men living in Japan had twice the blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids-a finding that was independently linked to low levels of atherosclerosis.

    "The death rate from coronary heart disease in Japan has always been puzzlingly low. Our study suggests that the very low rates of coronary heart disease among Japanese living in Japan may be due to their lifelong high consumption of fish," Sekikawa said."

    Results showed that the Japanese men had the lowest levels of atherosclerosis, whereas whites and Japanese Americans had similar higher levels. The Japanese men also had twofold higher levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids than white and Japanese Americans.

    In addition, the significant differences between Japanese and American men in multivariable-adjusted IMT and CAC prevalence became nonsignificant after adjustment further for marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids.
Matti Narkia

Omega-3 Rather Than Genetics Is Key to Lack of CHD in Japanese? - Medscape - 0 views

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    July 29, 2008 - The low rate of atherosclerosis and heart disease in Japanese people may be related to their very high levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids rather than genetic factors, a new study suggests [1].

    The study, known as Electron-Beam Tomography, Risk Factor Assessment Among Japanese and US Men in the Post-World War II Birth Cohort (ERA JUMP) included 868 randomly selected men aged 40 to 49. Of these, 281 were Japanese men living in Japan; 306 were white men living in the US, and 281 were third- or fourth-generation Japanese American men from Hawaii. All study participants had a physical examination, completed a lifestyle questionnaire, and had blood tests to measure cholesterol levels and levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Atherosclerosis was assessed by measuring carotid intima-medial thickness (IMT) and coronary artery calcification (CAC).

    Results showed that the Japanese men had the lowest levels of atherosclerosis, whereas whites and Japanese Americans had similar higher levels. The Japanese men also had twofold higher levels of marine-derived omega-3 fatty acids than white and Japanese Americans.

    The study, published in the August 5, 2008 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (available online July 28), was conducted by a group led by Dr Akira Sekikawa (University of Pittsburgh, PA, and Shiga University of Medical Science, Japan).

    They found that compared with white or Japanese American men living in the US, Japanese men living in Japan had twice the blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids - a finding that was independently linked to low levels of atherosclerosis.
Matti Narkia

Marine-derived n-3 fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Japanese, Japanese Americans, and... - 0 views

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    Marine-derived n-3 fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Japanese, Japanese-American, and white men: a cross-sectional study.
    Sekikawa A, Curb JD, Ueshima H, El-Saed A, Kadowaki T, Abbott RD, Evans RW, Rodriguez BL, Okamura T, Sutton-Tyrrell K, Nakamura Y, Masaki K, Edmundowicz D, Kashiwagi A, Willcox BJ, Takamiya T, Mitsunami K, Seto TB, Murata K, White RL, Kuller LH; ERA JUMP (Electron-Beam Tomography, Risk Factor Assessment Among Japanese and U.S. Men in the Post-World War II Birth Cohort) Study Group.
    J Am Coll Cardiol. 2008 Aug 5;52(6):417-24.
    PMID: 18672160

    Conclusions
    Very high levels of marine-derived n-3 FAs have anti-atherogenic properties independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and may contribute to lower burden of atherosclerosis in Japanese in Japan, which is unlikely due to genetic factors.
Matti Narkia

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations and carotid artery intima-media thickness amo... - 0 views

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    Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 concentrations and carotid artery intima-media thickness among type 2 diabetic patients.
    Targher G, Bertolini L, Padovani R, Zenari L, Scala L, Cigolini M, Arcaro G.
    Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2006 Nov;65(5):593-7.
    PMID: 17054459
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2265.2006.02633.x

    CONCLUSIONS: Hypovitaminosis D is highly prevalent in type 2 diabetic adults and is strongly and independently associated with increased carotid IMT. Further investigation into whether vitamin D may play a role in the prevention of atherosclerosis appears to be warranted.

    In conclusion, our results show that type 2 diabetic adults have significant reductions in serum 25(OH)D concentrations (vs matched controls) that predict preclinical atherosclerosis, independent of classical risk factors, renal function tests, inflammatory markers, use of medications and presence of the metabolic syndrome. These findings suggest the need for ongoing evaluation of the possible protective role of vitamin D3 supplementation in the development of atherosclerosis.
Matti Narkia

Vitamin C-rich foods may boost artery health - 0 views

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    Increased intake of vitamin C-rich foods may reduce the risk of hardening of the arteries, and ultimately protect against heart disease, says a new study from Norway.\nWriting in the journal Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, researchers from Ulleval University Hospital in Norway report that increased intakes of vitamin C and fruit and berries were associated with less thickening of the carotid artery.
Matti Narkia

Pomegranate juice consumption for 3 years by patients with carotid artery stenosis redu... - 0 views

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    Pomegranate juice consumption for 3 years by patients with carotid artery stenosis reduces common carotid intima-media thickness, blood pressure and LDL oxidation.\nAviram M, Rosenblat M, Gaitini D, Nitecki S, Hoffman A, Dornfeld L, Volkova N, Presser D, Attias J, Liker H, Hayek T.\nClin Nutr. 2004 Jun;23(3):423-33. Erratum in: Clin Nutr. 2008 Aug;27(4):671.\nPMID: 15158307
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