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Matti Narkia

25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand - Lou et al. - J Steroi... - 1 views

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    25-Hydroxyvitamin D(3) is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand.
    Lou YR, Molnár F, Peräkylä M, Qiao S, Kalueff AV, St-Arnaud R, Carlberg C, Tuohimaa P.
    J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2009 Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19944755
    doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2009.11.011

    In conclusion, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand with gene regulatory and anti-proliferative properties.
Matti Narkia

Retinol-induced Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Min/+ Mice and Importance of Vitamin D Stat... - 0 views

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    "Retinol-induced Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Min/+ Mice and Importance of Vitamin D Status.
    Hetland RB, Alexander J, Berg JP, Svendsen C, Paulsen JE.
    Anticancer Res. 2009 Nov;29(11):4353-60.
    PMID: 20032378

    The effects of life-long dietary exposure, starting in utero, to high retinol, low vitamin D, or high retinol in combination with low vitamin D on intestinal tumorigenesis in Min/+ mice were investigated. In males, high retinol alone significantly increased the number (2.6-fold) and size (1.3-fold) of small intestinal tumours; in females no significant increase in tumour number or size was seen. In both genders, low vitamin D intake alone did not affect intestinal tumorigenesis. In males, intake of the combined high retinol/low vitamin D diet did not further increase the effects caused by high retinol alone. In females, however, the high retinol/low vitamin D-induced increase in tumour number (3.1-fold) and tumour size (1.5-fold) exceeded that of high retinol alone. In conclusion, a high dietary intake of retinol stimulated intestinal tumorigenesis in Min/+ mice. Furthermore, the results indicate a combined effect of high retinol and low vitamin D on tumorigenesis in females"
Matti Narkia

Super Foods: Horseradish: Protection Against Cancer and More - Life Extension - 0 views

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    "Horseradish
    Protection Against Cancer and More
    By Steve Goodman
    Horseradish: Protection Against Cancer and More

    Whether it's fighting the flu and respiratory disorders or combating tonsillitis and urinary tract infections, horseradish is a condiment that can help keep you healthy.1-3 Used to treat a wide variety of ailments over centuries, nearly every part of the horseradish plant seems to have some medicinal value. Tea made from its root has been used as an expectorant,1 while tea brewed from its flowers can be used to fight the common cold.3 A poultice can also be made of its roots to externally treat joint discomfort. In addition, raw leaves of horseradish also fulfill a purpose as a natural analgesic and, pressed against the forehead, can eliminate headache pain. Furthermore, an infusion of horseradish has known antibiotic properties,4-6 which have been proven effective against pathogenic fungi.4,5

    A perennial plant, horseradish is related to mustard, cabbage, and other cruciferous vegetables. Despite its long history as a versatile herbal remedy, however, perhaps the most interesting health benefit of horseradish is emerging from recent studies of its anticancer effects."
Matti Narkia

JUPITER: Primary-prevention statin therapy in women cuts cardiovascular risk in half - ... - 0 views

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    "November 25, 2009 | Michael O'Riordan

    Orlando, FL - Treating healthy women with low LDL cholesterol but elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) levels with rosuvastatin (Crestor, AstraZeneca) cuts their risk of cardiovascular events in half, according to a new analysis of Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER).

    The reduction in risk is consistent with the reduction observed in the overall trial, and with the 42% benefit observed in men.
Matti Narkia

NephroPal: Summer vs Winter Mode: Explaining AMPK - 0 views

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    "Summer vs Winter Mode: Explaining AMPK
    Last year I read an article which made a statement that has not left my mind. The statement went as follows: "You are only good as your mitochondria." In fact, the more a dwell into the details of human metabolism, the more I sense that this is true - especially with the metabolic syndrome.

    For those who are not familiar with the concept of mitochondria, they are the tiny energy factories within the cells that produce cellular energy through aerobic means (meaning oxygen). Mitochondria utilize oxygen to ultimately produce Adenosine Triphosphate or simply ATP. ATP relays energy by donating a phosphate bond resulting in Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP). Another phosphate release would entail Adenosine Monophosphate or AMP. ATP is one of the main sources of cellular energy in the body."
Matti Narkia

Vytorin Recall: New study shows vytorin and zetia less effective than niacin | Beasley ... - 0 views

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    "Vytorin has struck out again, this time in a clinical trial that compared the drug's safety and efficacy to a prescription form of the B vitamin niacin. The results of the trial, which the New England Journal of Medicine featured in an article and two editorials, were presented Sunday at an American Heart Association meeting and showed that in a direct comparison, niacin worked significantly better than Vytorin and Zetia in reducing arterial blockages. According to a report in NPR, "This study is the third to question whether ezetimibe drugs do what they're supposed to."

    If lowering LDL or "bad" cholesterol is the doctor's sole intention when prescribing Vytorin to patients, then the drug does a great job. However, as previous studies have shown, lower levels of LDL cholesterol don't automatically translate to cleaner arteries and lower incidences of cardiac arrest. While Vytorin worked better than statins combined with time-release Niacin to lower LDL cholesterol in 200 patients, its performance was inferior in reducing artery clogging deposits."
Matti Narkia

Niacin best for raising good cholesterol | ZDNet Healthcare | ZDNet.com - 0 views

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    "Want more of that good HDL cholesterol?

    Try a timed-release niacin, and be skeptical if your doctor gives the sales pitch for Zetia or Vytorin.

    The authority for this is a study dubbed ARBITER-6, which was stopped suddenly this summer, with the study's authors insisting safety had nothing to do with it.

    It was a question of efficacy.

    The results, described in the New England Journal of Medicine, make clear that niacin does better at the main job, keeping arteries open"
Matti Narkia

NEJM -- Extended-Release Niacin or Ezetimibe and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness - 0 views

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    Extended-release niacin or ezetimibe and carotid intima-media thickness.
    Taylor AJ, Villines TC, Stanek EJ, Devine PJ, Griffen L, Miller M, Weissman NJ, Turco M.
    N Engl J Med. 2009 Nov 26;361(22):2113-22. Epub 2009 Nov 15.
    PMID: 19915217

    Conclusions This comparative-effectiveness trial shows that the use of extended-release niacin causes a significant regression of carotid intima-media thickness when combined with a statin and that niacin is superior to ezetimibe. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00397657 [ClinicalTrials.gov] .
Matti Narkia

The hypoglycemic effect of fat and protein is not attenuated by insulin resistance -- L... - 0 views

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    The hypoglycemic effect of fat and protein is not attenuated by insulin resistance.
    Lan-Pidhainy X, Wolever TM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov 18. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19923374
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.28125

    Conclusions: The hypoglycemic effect of fat and protein was not blunted by insulin resistance. Protein increased insulin but had no effect on C-peptide or the insulin secretion rate, which suggests decreased hepatic insulin extraction or increased C-peptide clearance.
Matti Narkia

Cardiovascular disease risk of dietary stearic acid compared with trans, other saturate... - 0 views

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    Cardiovascular disease risk of dietary stearic acid compared with trans, other saturated, and unsaturated fatty acids: a systematic review1,3.
    Hunter JE, Zhang J, Kris-Etherton PM.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2009 Nov 25. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19939984
    doi:10.3945/ajcn.2009.27661

    Conclusions: TFA intake should be reduced as much as possible because of its adverse effects on lipids and lipoproteins. The replacement of TFA with STA compared with other saturated fatty acids in foods that require solid fats beneficially affects LDL cholesterol, the primary target for CVD risk reduction; unsaturated fats are preferred for liquid fat applications. Research is needed to evaluate the effects of STA on emerging CVD risk markers such as fibrinogen and to understand the responses in different populations.
Matti Narkia

Acute Ingestion of Long-Chain (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Decreases Fibrinolysis ... - 0 views

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    Acute Ingestion of Long-Chain (n-3) Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Decreases Fibrinolysis in Men with Metabolic Syndrome.
    Montegaard C, Tulk HM, Lauritzen L, Tholstrup T, Robinson LE.
    J Nutr. 2009 Nov 4. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19889809
    doi:10.3945/jn.109.111427

    Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS) often have elevated plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA), contributing to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. PAI-1 and t-PA may be affected by chronic (n-3) long-chain PUFA [(n-3)LCPUFA] supplementation; however, the acute impact of fat ingestion on these risk factors has not been established. Our objective was to investigate the acute effect of (n-3)LCPUFA on plasma PAI-1, t-PA, and platelet aggregation. We conducted a randomized crossover study in which men (n = 8, ≥45 y) with MetS consumed water or a high-saturated fat beverage (1 g fat/kg body weight) with either a high or low content of (n-3)LCPUFA. Blood samples were collected over 8 h to measure triacylglycerol (TAG), PAI-1, t-PA, and platelet aggregation. Both fat loads resulted in a significant increase in whole blood TAG concentration, plasma PAI-1 and t-PA concentrations, and PAI-1 activity, as well as a significant decrease in t-PA activity during the postprandial period. Interestingly, PAI-1 concentration and activity increased more following the high (n-3)LCPUFA compared with the low (n-3)LCPUFA beverage (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the high (n-3)LCPUFA beverage resulted in a lower t-PA activity (P < 0.05), whereas the effects of the 2 fat loads on the plasma t-PA concentration and platelet aggregation did not differ. Overall, acute intake of a high (n-3)LCPUFA beverage shifted the balance between plasma PAI-1 and t-PA, which might indicate a lower capacity for fibrinolysis
Matti Narkia

25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand - ScienceDirect - The Jo... - 0 views

  •  
    25-Hydroxyvitamin D(3) is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand.
    Lou YR, Molnár F, Peräkylä M, Qiao S, Kalueff AV, St-Arnaud R, Carlberg C, Tuohimaa P.
    J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2009 Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19944755
    doi:10.1016/j.jsbmb.2009.11.011

    In conclusion, 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is an agonistic vitamin D receptor ligand with gene regulatory and anti-proliferative properties.
Matti Narkia

The Vitamin D-Antimicrobial Peptide Pathway and Its Role in Protection Against Infectio... - 1 views

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    The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infection.
    Gombart AF.
    Future Microbiol. 2009 Nov;4:1151-65.
    PMID: 19895218

    Vitamin D deficiency has been correlated with increased rates of infection. Since the early 19th century, both environmental (i.e., sunlight) and dietary sources (cod liver) of vitamin D have been identified as treatments for TB. The recent discovery that vitamin D induces antimicrobial peptide gene expression explains, in part, the 'antibiotic' effect of vitamin D and has greatly renewed interest in the ability of vitamin D to improve immune function. Subsequent work indicates that this regulation is biologically important for the response of the innate immune system to wounds and infection and that deficiency may lead to suboptimal responses toward bacterial and viral infections. The regulation of the cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide gene is a human/primate-specific adaptation and is not conserved in other mammals. The capacity of the vitamin D receptor to act as a high-affinity receptor for vitamin D and a low-affinity receptor for secondary bile acids and potentially other novel nutritional compounds suggests that the evolutionary selection to place the cathelicidin gene under control of the vitamin D receptor allows for its regulation under both endocrine and xenobiotic response systems. Future studies in both humans and humanized mouse models will elucidate the importance of this regulation and lead to the development of potential therapeutic applications
Matti Narkia

Relationships between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Plasma Glucose and Lipid Levels in... - 0 views

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    Relationships between 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Plasma Glucose and Lipid Levels in Pediatric Outpatients.
    Johnson MD, Nader NS, Weaver AL, Singh R, Kumar S.
    J Pediatr. 2009 Nov 17. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19926097

    Conclusions
    Low 25(OH) D levels in children and adolescents are associated with higher plasma glucose and lower HDL concentrations.
Matti Narkia

Natural Sphingadienes Inhibit Akt-Dependent Signaling and Prevent Intestinal Tumorigene... - 0 views

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    Natural Sphingadienes Inhibit Akt-Dependent Signaling and Prevent Intestinal Tumorigenesis.
    Fyrst H, Oskouian B, Bandhuvula P, Gong Y, Byun HS, Bittman R, Lee AR, Saba JD.
    Cancer Res. 2009 Nov 24. [Epub ahead of print]
    PMID: 19934323
    DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-09-2341
Matti Narkia

The Heart Scan Blog: Heart Scan Blog Redux: Cheers to flavonoids - 0 views

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    "Because in Track Your Plaque we've been thinking a lot about anthocyanins, here's a rerun of a previous Heart Scan Blog post about red wine. (Anthocyanins are among the interesting flavonoids in red wine, along with resveratrol and quercetin.) "
Matti Narkia

W.O.W. 11/15/09 (and a little D3) » - 0 views

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    "Last Wednesday night I gave a lecture to my clients on hunter-gatherer diets. The turnout was great and the information was well-received. I had it professionally video-recorded and will probably offer this as a DVD for sale (with the handout included). Watch for it in the future. Part of what I discussed was vitamin D3 supplementation. Since I have been supplementing with 4,000-10,000 Units of D3 per day I have noted enhanced recovery and size response from my training. Apparently, skeletal muscle has both surface receptors and nuclear receptors for D3 that augment calcium flux during contraction (from surface receptors) and have steroid-like effects at the nuclear level WRT protein synthesis. This D3 supplementation is not really "supplementation" but is instead "augmentation" to levels that would be normal if we got normal sun exposure as we did in our evolutionary past. Check out www.vitamindcouncil.org for more information. Also, check out this abstract below for your consideration. Also, check out this article."
Matti Narkia

Head And Neck Cancer Survivors Who Use Alcohol And Cigarettes Have Increased Death Risk - 0 views

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    "Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption before head and neck cancer diagnosis strongly predicts the patient's future risk of death, according to published studies. Now, results of a new study show a similar effect among those who continued these habits after cancer diagnosis.

    "Most cancer survivors are counseled to quit smoking; despite this, many still smoke. In our study, 21 percent continued to smoke even after their cancer diagnosis, increasing their risk of death," said researcher Susan T. Mayne, Ph.D. "Similarly, we found that continued drinking increases the risk of death.""
Matti Narkia

Vitamin D Deficiency Lead to Disease - Dr. Weil's Weekly Bulletin - 0 views

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    "If you're running low on vitamin D - as an estimated 70 percent of the U.S. population is - your immune system may not be functioning as well as it should. As a result, you may be more vulnerable to infectious diseases than you would if your vitamin D levels were optimal. Worse, you could be at higher than normal risk of a long list of diseases including heart disease and several kinds of cancer. A report recently published journal, Future Microbiology, highlighted research at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, which has shown that vitamin D induces expression of an antimicrobial peptide gene called cathelicidin that is the "first line of defense" in the immune system's response to minor wounds, cuts and bacterial and viral infections. The regulation of cathelicidin by vitamin D could help explain its vital role in immune function. The report noted that vitamin D is a key cofactor in reducing inflammation, in blood pressure control and helping to protect against heart disease. Author Adrian Gombart explains that there is still much to explore about D's mechanisms of action, the potential use of synthetic analogs of it in new treatments, and its duty in fighting infection."
Matti Narkia

The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infectio... - 0 views

  •  
    The vitamin D-antimicrobial peptide pathway and its role in protection against infection.
    Gombart AF.
    Future Microbiol. 2009 Nov;4:1151-65.
    PMID: 19895218
    doi:10.2217/fmb.09.87
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