Skip to main content

Home/ nuke.news/ Group items tagged uk nuclear scandal

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Energy Net

North West Evening Mail | News | Claims of 'handouts' for nuclear reactors denied - 0 views

  •  
    "ENVIRONMENTAL campaigners have accused the government of preparing to allow multi-million pound "handouts" to firms building nuclear reactors.

    Greenpeace said the move went against assurances given by ministers that the nuclear industry would not receive any handouts to help build new nuclear power stations.

    The government has denied the accusation.

    Business leaders in Cumbria hope a new generation of reactors will cement the county's position as a key player in the global atomic energy industry.

    Three locations in West Cumbria have been put forward as potential reactor sites - in Kirksanton, Braystones and Sellafield.

    Nuclear is a cornerstone of the multi-billion pound Energy Coast Masterplan vision for the area."
Energy Net

'Radioactive waste threat' to future of Stratford site | News - 0 views

  •  
    "Radioactive waste buried under the Olympic Park could jeopardise plans to develop the site after the Games, it is claimed.

    Traces of thorium and radium have been buried in a disposal cell under the site of the main stadium. The Olympic Delivery Authority insists the deposits pose no risk during the Games.

    But experts say that a reassessment of the site after 2012 may be necessary before any development plans - housing, for instance - are put in place.

    Independent nuclear analyst John Large said: "There is some doubt about the applicability and validity of the radiological risk analysis undertaken for the future legacy use."

    The Lower Lea Valley site was industrial land which was used for landfill and where illegal dumping of waste was common in the Fifties and Sixties."
Energy Net

Tonnes of radioactive waste casts doubt over London's Olympic stadium legacy | Business... - 0 views

  •  
    "The development of the Olympic site in east London after the Games have finished could be in jeopardy because of radioactive waste buried beneath the site, experts have warned.

    According to a Guardian investigation, any development of the site risks unearthing a hundred tonnes of radioactive waste dumped at the former landfill site decades ago. Documents obtained under Freedom of Information (FOI) rules reveal that, contrary to government guidelines, waste from thorium and radium has been mixed with very low-level waste and buried in a so-called disposal cell under, or close, to the Olympic stadium."
Energy Net

MoD tries to stop atomic test veterans claiming damages - Home News, UK - The Independent - 0 views

  •  
    "Ministers went to court yesterday to try to stop former British servicemen from receiving compensation for illnesses that they allege they suffered during Britain's atomic testing programme in the 1950s.

    In June last year the High Court ruled that 10 test cases out of more than 1,000 claims could proceed to trial.

    The servicemen blame their ill-health, including cancer, skin defects and fertility problems, on involvement in the nuclear tests on the Australian mainland, Monte Bello islands and Christmas Island between 1952 and 1958. Many are terminally ill and seven - including five of the test case claimants - have died since the litigation began.

    While acknowledging the "debt of gratitude" owed to the men, the Ministry of Defence denies negligence and fought the cases on the preliminary point that they were all launched outside the legal time limit."
Energy Net

BBC News - Radioactive waste from Sellafield dumped in landfill - 0 views

  •  
    "An investigation has begun into how bags of radioactive waste from the Sellafield nuclear complex in Cumbria ended up in a landfill site.

    Five bags of low-level waste were sent to Lillyhall in Workington, instead of to the nearby Drigg nuclear waste dump.

    Sellafield stressed the bags, which contained paper, plastic, clothing and wood, were no danger to the public.

    It is thought monitoring equipment failed to properly identify the bags as containing low-level radioactive waste.

    All the bags have been retrieved and returned to Sellafield. "
Energy Net

Budget 2010: Consumers face levy on energy bills to pay for nuclear plants | UK news | ... - 0 views

  •  
    "The government has officially confirmed plans for a new carbon levy on consumer bills which it hopes will make building new nuclear plants viable, as the Guardian revealed in October last year.

    Nuclear companies like EDF Energy have warned they will not make the billions of pounds of investment necessary in the UK without government financial guarantees.

    Speaking to the Guardian, the energy secretary, Ed Miliband, admitted that the energy market needed "radical reform", but denied the plans amounted to subsidies for the nuclear industry. He insisted that all forms of low-carbon generation - nuclear plants, wind farms and clean coal plants - would benefit from the proposed changes."
Energy Net

Power Company Plans To Convert Efficient Wind Farm Into Nuclear Plant To Meet Low Carbo... - 0 views

  •  
    "There is growing anger at proposals to build a new nuclear power station on the site of the second-oldest wind farm in Britain.

    Wind farm climate change global warming

    The site is just 100 metres away from the Lake District border

    Situated just 100 metres from the Lake District border, the small community-owned Haverigg wind farm in Kirksanton is one of the most efficient in the country.

    The land has made the Government shortlist of 10 sites judged potentially suitable for new nuclear build.

    Wind farm co-owner, Colin Palmer, told Sky News the turbines would have to be demolished if the plans go ahead because of underground cables."
Energy Net

AFP: Russian tycoon wins libel case over radiation murder - 0 views

  •  
    "Exiled Russian oligarch Boris Berezovsky won £150,000 ($220,000, 165,000 euros) in libel damages on Wednesday over a claim he was linked to the murder of ex-spy Alexander Litvinenko.

    A judge in London said there was "no evidence" that Berezovsky -- a fierce critic of Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin -- was behind the poisoning by radiation of Litvinenko in 2006.

    "I can say unequivocally that there is no evidence before me that Mr. Berezovsky had any part in the murder of Mr. Litvinenko," said judge David Eady, handing down his ruling at the High Court.

    "Nor, for that matter, do I see any basis for reasonable grounds to suspect him of it," he added."
Energy Net

Whitehaven News | Ex-Sellafield nuclear plant boss received £2 million pay-off - 0 views

  •  
    "Sellafield's former top boss Barry Snelson got a £2 million pay off when he left the site just over a year ago.

    The ex-managing director picked up £1,859,000 as compensation for "loss of office" rising to over £2m under long-term incentive schemes and emoluments.

    This came on top of his pension after working for nearly 30 years with British Nuclear Fuels."
Energy Net

Pressure on Blair as he makes final stand on Iraq | The Observer - 0 views

  •  
    "It is almost seven years since Tony Blair led Britain into war in Iraq. But when he strides into the Queen Elizabeth II Conference Centre in Westminster at 9.30 on Friday morning, through a ring of steel set up by the security services, the passage of time will count for nothing.

    Behind the former prime minister will sit more than 20 bereaved relatives of soldiers killed in the conflict, mothers and fathers who will struggle, perhaps for ever, to come to terms with their loss.

    The organisers of the inquiry have been at pains to try to reduce the emotional temperature around Blair's attendance. "The members of the committee are not judges, and nobody is on trial," says the official inquiry website."
Energy Net

Nuclear-test veterans' outrage as legal bill soars to £16m - mirror.co.uk - 0 views

  •  
    Lawyers have charged £16million in the battle to get justice for Britain's nuclear test veterans.

    The money has been spent by legal teams for the UK Ministry of Defence and the veterans during a fiercely contested High Court action. It means the final bill could be much higher than any com-pensation eventually received.

    The revelation comes after a judge told both sides, who are meant to have been negotiating a settlement for the past six months, to start talks. Some 22,000 men, who were sent to Australia and the South Pacific to witness atomic bomb tests, allegedly suffered a range of health problems.

    Many of the 3,000 survivors have joined together in a major legal case to sue the MoD for negligence. But the case has descended into farce, with the MoD claiming a confidential offer has been made, but vets' lawyers saying they haven't received one. The High Court was told on Friday that costs are already at £15m for the three-year case, with a further £1m expected to pay for an appeal brought by the MoD which will be heard in May.
  •  
    Lawyers have charged £16million in the battle to get justice for Britain's nuclear test veterans.

    The money has been spent by legal teams for the UK Ministry of Defence and the veterans during a fiercely contested High Court action. It means the final bill could be much higher than any com-pensation eventually received.

    The revelation comes after a judge told both sides, who are meant to have been negotiating a settlement for the past six months, to start talks. Some 22,000 men, who were sent to Australia and the South Pacific to witness atomic bomb tests, allegedly suffered a range of health problems.

    Many of the 3,000 survivors have joined together in a major legal case to sue the MoD for negligence. But the case has descended into farce, with the MoD claiming a confidential offer has been made, but vets' lawyers saying they haven't received one. The High Court was told on Friday that costs are already at £15m for the three-year case, with a further £1m expected to pay for an appeal brought by the MoD which will be heard in May.
Energy Net

MoD unmoving on atomic veterans - politics.co.uk - 0 views

  •  
    The government is refusing to back down over attempts to force it to compensate British nuclear test veterans.

    Armed forces minister Kevan Jones admitted he had sympathy for over 1,000 veterans of nuclear tests carried out in the 1950s who are seeking compensation.

    But he said their attempts would continue to be rejected by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) because of a lack of "hard evidence" that their illnesses were caused by exposure to radiation.

    Labour backbencher Siobhain McDonagh, who obtained the adjournment debate, told the Commons the husband of one of her constituents had committed suicide in 1976 "after 18 years of pain".
  •  
    The government is refusing to back down over attempts to force it to compensate British nuclear test veterans.

    Armed forces minister Kevan Jones admitted he had sympathy for over 1,000 veterans of nuclear tests carried out in the 1950s who are seeking compensation.

    But he said their attempts would continue to be rejected by the Ministry of Defence (MoD) because of a lack of "hard evidence" that their illnesses were caused by exposure to radiation.

    Labour backbencher Siobhain McDonagh, who obtained the adjournment debate, told the Commons the husband of one of her constituents had committed suicide in 1976 "after 18 years of pain".
Energy Net

Security 'cover-up' at nuclear plants | Environment | The Observer - 0 views

  •  
    Ministers refuse to release details of five incidents last year

    The government is refusing to provide details on five separate security breaches at Britain's nuclear power stations last year.

    The breaches have prompted accusations that ministers are suppressing damaging information at a time when they are attempting to sell the idea of more nuclear power stations. Earlier this month, 10 new sites in England and Wales were approved.

    The energy secretary, Ed Miliband, told MPs that nuclear was a "proven and reliable" energy source. But the latest annual report from the Office for Civil Nuclear Security (OCNS) has prompted questions about the measures being taken to protect the country's ageing plants. The report states that nuclear operators must disclose "events and occurrences which may be of interest from a security point of view". It notes: "Five reports were made which warranted further investigation and subsequent follow-up action."
  •  
    Ministers refuse to release details of five incidents last year

    The government is refusing to provide details on five separate security breaches at Britain's nuclear power stations last year.

    The breaches have prompted accusations that ministers are suppressing damaging information at a time when they are attempting to sell the idea of more nuclear power stations. Earlier this month, 10 new sites in England and Wales were approved.

    The energy secretary, Ed Miliband, told MPs that nuclear was a "proven and reliable" energy source. But the latest annual report from the Office for Civil Nuclear Security (OCNS) has prompted questions about the measures being taken to protect the country's ageing plants. The report states that nuclear operators must disclose "events and occurrences which may be of interest from a security point of view". It notes: "Five reports were made which warranted further investigation and subsequent follow-up action."
Energy Net

Nuclear waste moved off the agenda (environmentalresearchweb blog) - environmentalresea... - 0 views

  •  
    The governments new draft National Policy Statement on nuclear power, indicating which issues the new Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) should take on board, and which it can ignore, contains this remarkable statement:

    "The Government is satisfied that effective arrangements will exist to manage and dispose of the waste that will be produced from new nuclear power stations. As a result the IPC need not consider this question." The draft Statement goes on to say that 'Geological disposal will be preceded by safe and secure interim storage'.

    So it seems, the waste issue is all in hand and we needn't bother too much about it, or any problems with the much more active spent fuel that the new reactors' high fuel 'burn up' approach will create. Despite the fact that the highly active spent fuel is to be kept on site at the plant for perhaps several decades, that is evidently not something IPC will have to consider in its assessment of whether the proposed plants can go ahead. Instead the IPC will just focus on any conventional local planning and environmental impact issues that may emerge in relation to the 10 new nuclear plants that the government has now backed.
  •  
    The governments new draft National Policy Statement on nuclear power, indicating which issues the new Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) should take on board, and which it can ignore, contains this remarkable statement:

    "The Government is satisfied that effective arrangements will exist to manage and dispose of the waste that will be produced from new nuclear power stations. As a result the IPC need not consider this question." The draft Statement goes on to say that 'Geological disposal will be preceded by safe and secure interim storage'.

    So it seems, the waste issue is all in hand and we needn't bother too much about it, or any problems with the much more active spent fuel that the new reactors' high fuel 'burn up' approach will create. Despite the fact that the highly active spent fuel is to be kept on site at the plant for perhaps several decades, that is evidently not something IPC will have to consider in its assessment of whether the proposed plants can go ahead. Instead the IPC will just focus on any conventional local planning and environmental impact issues that may emerge in relation to the 10 new nuclear plants that the government has now backed.
Energy Net

BBC NEWS | UK | England | Cumbria | BNP makes Sellafield legal threat - 0 views

  •  
    he BNP has said it is considering "legal avenues" after its leader was refused permission to visit the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant.

    Nick Griffin had wanted a fact-finding tour of the site, which is in his North West European Parliament constituency.

    But Sellafield Limited, the facility's operator, said it was concerned about security and possible demonstrations.
  •  
    he BNP has said it is considering "legal avenues" after its leader was refused permission to visit the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant.

    Nick Griffin had wanted a fact-finding tour of the site, which is in his North West European Parliament constituency.

    But Sellafield Limited, the facility's operator, said it was concerned about security and possible demonstrations.
  •  
    he BNP has said it is considering "legal avenues" after its leader was refused permission to visit the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant.

    Nick Griffin had wanted a fact-finding tour of the site, which is in his North West European Parliament constituency.

    But Sellafield Limited, the facility's operator, said it was concerned about security and possible demonstrations.
Energy Net

Calls to reveal top-secret nuclear dump - News - Roundup - Articles - Helensburgh Adver... - 0 views

  •  
    A PLEA has been made for the Government to reveal a top-secret nuclear dumping ground situated in Argyll and Bute.

    MP Alan Reid has called on the defence secretary, Bob Ainsworth, to come forward and name the site where the waste - radioactive waste from decommissioned nuclear submarines - is being disposed of.

    It comes after revelations that at least one site on the confidential list is situated in Argyll and Bute.

    It was also revealed that Coulport was previously named as a possible site, but was later rejected.

    Mr Reid said: "Every community in Argyll and Bute is now worried that a site near them is on the secret list of sites being considered as a nuclear dump.

    "The Government must publish the list of sites. Publishing the list would set some people's minds at rest.
  •  
    A PLEA has been made for the Government to reveal a top-secret nuclear dumping ground situated in Argyll and Bute.

    MP Alan Reid has called on the defence secretary, Bob Ainsworth, to come forward and name the site where the waste - radioactive waste from decommissioned nuclear submarines - is being disposed of.

    It comes after revelations that at least one site on the confidential list is situated in Argyll and Bute.

    It was also revealed that Coulport was previously named as a possible site, but was later rejected.

    Mr Reid said: "Every community in Argyll and Bute is now worried that a site near them is on the secret list of sites being considered as a nuclear dump.

    "The Government must publish the list of sites. Publishing the list would set some people's minds at rest.
Energy Net

Energy fears over nuclear waste dumps | Environment | The Observer - 0 views

  •  
    Former senior advisers say ministers 'cherry-picked' reports to bolster case for new power plants

    Former senior government advisers on nuclear power have accused ministers of being "cavalier" and "cherry-picking" their advice to bolster the case for a new generation of nuclear power stations.

    They and other industry experts say the government should not embark on building any new atomic facilities without properly tackling the unsolved problem of how to deal with radioactive waste from existing power plants.

    In 2006 the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management published recommendations on how the UK should dispose of nuclear waste. A key idea was that long-term disposal would be best carried out by identifying suitable sites at which the waste could be buried, a process called deep geological disposal.
  •  
    Former senior advisers say ministers 'cherry-picked' reports to bolster case for new power plants

    Former senior government advisers on nuclear power have accused ministers of being "cavalier" and "cherry-picking" their advice to bolster the case for a new generation of nuclear power stations.

    They and other industry experts say the government should not embark on building any new atomic facilities without properly tackling the unsolved problem of how to deal with radioactive waste from existing power plants.

    In 2006 the Committee on Radioactive Waste Management published recommendations on how the UK should dispose of nuclear waste. A key idea was that long-term disposal would be best carried out by identifying suitable sites at which the waste could be buried, a process called deep geological disposal.
Energy Net

BBC NEWS | 'Toxic waste' report gag lifted - 0 views

  •  
    Lawyers for the oil trading company Trafigura have ended attempts to keep secret a scientific report about toxic waste dumping in the Ivory Coast.

    The legal firm Carter-Ruck has written to the Guardian saying the paper should regard itself as "released forthwith" from any reporting restrictions.

    Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger welcomed the move.

    Trafigura said neither they nor Carter-Ruck had "improperly sought to stifle or restrict" debate and reporting.

    An MP revealed the report's existence to parliament earlier this week after the Guardian was served with a "super-injunction" banning all mention of it.
  •  
    Lawyers for the oil trading company Trafigura have ended attempts to keep secret a scientific report about toxic waste dumping in the Ivory Coast.

    The legal firm Carter-Ruck has written to the Guardian saying the paper should regard itself as "released forthwith" from any reporting restrictions.

    Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger welcomed the move.

    Trafigura said neither they nor Carter-Ruck had "improperly sought to stifle or restrict" debate and reporting.

    An MP revealed the report's existence to parliament earlier this week after the Guardian was served with a "super-injunction" banning all mention of it.
Energy Net

UK secrets at risk over sex romps of nuke chief's secy? - UK - World - The Times of India - 0 views

  •  
    A personal assistant to Britain's nuclear weapons chief has been told that she has put the national security at risk by being a part of a sex scandal.

    Julia Sinclair, 48, is secretary to Rear Admiral Stephen Lloyd, who is in charge of procurement and delivery of nuclear submarines. According to experts, married mum-of-two Sinclair is at risk of being blackmailed by indulging in sordid orgies.
    Her sleazy hobby was revealed when pictures of her at two orgies were circulated among fellow swingers.

    Sinclair has high-level security clearance, and access to strategic documents at Abbey Wood ministry of defence base near Bristol.

    "It's a huge security risk. This is what the Soviets always tried to do to - catch someone in a sensitive post, get them in a sexual situation and take pictures to blackmail them into being a spy," The Sun quoted security expert Chris Dobson, as saying.
  •  
    A personal assistant to Britain's nuclear weapons chief has been told that she has put the national security at risk by being a part of a sex scandal.

    Julia Sinclair, 48, is secretary to Rear Admiral Stephen Lloyd, who is in charge of procurement and delivery of nuclear submarines. According to experts, married mum-of-two Sinclair is at risk of being blackmailed by indulging in sordid orgies.
    Her sleazy hobby was revealed when pictures of her at two orgies were circulated among fellow swingers.

    Sinclair has high-level security clearance, and access to strategic documents at Abbey Wood ministry of defence base near Bristol.

    "It's a huge security risk. This is what the Soviets always tried to do to - catch someone in a sensitive post, get them in a sexual situation and take pictures to blackmail them into being a spy," The Sun quoted security expert Chris Dobson, as saying.
Energy Net

UK wastes billions on defence projects-govt report | Currencies | Reuters - 0 views

  •  
    * Equipment programme unsuited to meet likely threats

    * Report may put future spending plans at risk

    By Adrian Croft

    LONDON, Oct 15 (Reuters) - Britain wastes up to 2.2 billion pounds ($3.57 billion) a year because of over-ambitious defence projects getting out of control, a government-commissioned report said on Thursday.

    The scathing report, by former Ministry of Defence adviser Bernard Gray, found the average defence equipment programme takes five years longer and costs 40 percent more than originally planned.
  •  
    * Equipment programme unsuited to meet likely threats

    * Report may put future spending plans at risk

    By Adrian Croft

    LONDON, Oct 15 (Reuters) - Britain wastes up to 2.2 billion pounds ($3.57 billion) a year because of over-ambitious defence projects getting out of control, a government-commissioned report said on Thursday.

    The scathing report, by former Ministry of Defence adviser Bernard Gray, found the average defence equipment programme takes five years longer and costs 40 percent more than originally planned.
1 - 20 of 88 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page