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Tero Toivanen

Berkeley researchers map out how our brains categorize the things we see | The Verge - 2 views

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    "Researchers at the University of California, Berkeley have created a map showing how and where the brain categorizes the actions and objects we see every day."
Tero Toivanen

Your Brain at Work - YouTube - 0 views

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    This is Fantastic!
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    This is Fantastic! via Jesse Soininen
Tero Toivanen

Map of Synapse May Help Understand Basis of Many Diseases - NYTimes.com - 3 views

  • The research team, led by Seth Grant of the Sanger Institute near Cambridge, England, compiled the first exact inventory of all the protein components of the synaptic information-processing machinery. No fewer than 1,461 proteins are involved in this biological machinery, they report in the current issue of Nature Neuroscience.
  • Each neuron in the human brain makes an average 1,000 or so connections with other neurons. There are 100 billion neurons, so the brain probably contains 100 trillion synapses, its most critical working part.
  • The 1,461 genes that specify these synaptic proteins constitute more than 7 percent of the human genome’s 20,000 protein-coding genes, an indication of the synapse’s complexity and importance.
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  • Dr. Grant believes that the proteins are probably linked together to form several biological machines that process the information and change the physical properties of the neuron as a way of laying down a memory.
  • The new catalog of synaptic proteins “should open a major new window in mental disease,” said Jeffrey Noebels, an expert on the genetics of epilepsy at the Baylor College of Medicine. “We can go in there and systematically look for disease pathways and therefore druggable targets.”
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    The research team, led by Seth Grant of the Sanger Institute near Cambridge, England, compiled the first exact inventory of all the protein components of the synaptic information-processing machinery. No fewer than 1,461 proteins are involved in this biological machinery
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    Seeing mental health as a druggable target is psychotic...
Tero Toivanen

Cord blood cell transplantation provides improvement for severely brain-injured child - 0 views

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    In three monthly injections, researchers transplanted neurally-committed, autologous cord blood derived cells tagged with iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) into the lateral cerebral ventricle of a 16-month old child with severe global hypoxic ischemic brain injury. The study is published in the current issue of Cell Medicine
Tero Toivanen

Inside the Brain: An Interactive Tour - 2 views

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    An Interactive Tour Inside the Brain.
Ruth Howard

BBC News - Brain scans 'can distinguish memories', say scientists - 0 views

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    Scientists say they have been able to tell which past event a person is recalling using a brain scan.

    The University College London researchers showed people film clips and were able to predict which ones they were subsequently thinking about.
Ruth Howard

Jill Bolte Taylor's stroke of insight | Video on TED.com - 1 views

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    Neuroscientist returns from near death experience specifically to deliver this message to us all...tho it takes 8 years to fully recover from her stroke.
    She experiences conscious awareness of the nature of duality that we all live within...inside our L&R brain hemispheres!!! She points to a conscious choice...and a purpose.
Ruth Howard

Global Consciousness Project -- consciousness, group consciousness, mind - 0 views

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    Global scale mind-matter via random number generators-map human conciousness
Ruth Howard

http://globalbrainpaint.com - 1 views

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    What do you make of this?!
Tero Toivanen

YouTube - Music and the Mind - 0 views

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    Aniruddh Patel's presentation about: What can music teach us about the brain? What can brain science teach us about music?

Tero Toivanen

YouTube - Science Commons by Jesse Dylan (Español) - 0 views

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    It's time for Common Science. Open research and science.
Tero Toivanen

Music and Intelligence | Boost Your IQ - 0 views

  • Studies indicate that early exposure to musical training helps a child’s brain reach its potential by generating neural connections utilized in abstract reasoning.
  • The reasoning skills required for a test in spatial reasoning are the same ones children use when they listen to music. Children use these reasoning skills to order the notes in their brain to form the melodies. Also, some concepts of math must be understood in order to understand music. Experts speculate that listening to music exercises the same parts of the brain that handle mathematics, logic, and higher level reasoning.
  • In 1997 a study involving three groups of preschoolers was conducted to determine the effect of music versus computer training on early childhood development.
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  • The group that received the piano/keyboard training scored 34% higher on tests measuring spatial-temporal ability than either of the other two groups. These results suggest that music enhances certain higher brain functions, particularly abstract reasoning skills, required in math and science.
  • The use of music in training four and five year old children yielded the highest improvement in the ability to name body parts.
  • Although the three experimental groups displayed an increase in their ability to name body parts the music group exhibited the highest degree of improvement.
  • First grade students received extensive Kodaly training for seven months.
  • At the end of seven months the experimental group had higher reading scores than the control group, which did not receive any special treatment. Not only did the seven month instruction increase reading scores, but continued musical training proved to be beneficial. The experimental group continued to show higher reading scores with continued training.
  • Students who were involved in arts education achieved higher SAT scores. The longer students were involved in arts education, the higher the increase in SAT scores. This study also correlated arts education with higher scores in standardized tests, reading, English, history, citizenship, and geography.
  • The results indicated that students with a relatively lower socioeconomic status, that were exposed to arts education, had an advantage over those students without any arts education which was proportionally equal to the students with a relatively higher socioeconomic status and exposure to arts education.
  • Music exposure affects older students as well. Three groups of college students were exposed to either Mozart’s Sonata for Two Pianos, K448, a relaxation tape, or silence. The group exposed to the Mozart piece was the only group to achieve an increase on the spatial IQ test. Further studies revealed that neither dance music nor taped short stories produced an increase in spatial IQ similar to the Mozart piece. The increase in spatial IQ appears to be related to some unique aspects of the Mozart piece rather than music in general.
  • Music may not only be related to intelligence by its stimulation of the brain, but it may also increase intelligence by the type of attitudes, interests, and discipline it fosters in children.
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    Studies indicate that early exposure to musical training helps a child's brain reach its potential by generating neural connections utilized in abstract reasoning.
Tero Toivanen

Lab Notes : The Brains of Early Birds and Night Owls - 0 views

  • There was no real difference between the early birds and the night owls in their performance on the morning test. But the evening test was a different story: night owls were less sleepy and had faster reaction times than early birds.
  • So even though both groups were sleeping and waking according to their preferred schedule, night owls generally outlasted early birds in how long they could stay awake and mentally alert before becoming mentally fatigued. The fMRI supported the behavioral results: 10.5 hours after waking up, the early birds had lower activity in brain regions linked to attention and the circadian master clock, compared to night owls.
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    A new study, in the journal Science, reports some intriguing differences between the brain-activity patterns of the two types that underlie the behavioral differences.
Tero Toivanen

Jeff Hawkins on how brain science will change computing | Video on TED.com - 0 views

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    Treo creator Jeff Hawkins urges us to take a new look at the brain -- to see it not as a fast processor, but as a memory system that stores and plays back experiences to help us predict, intelligently, what will happen next.
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