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David McGavock

Educational Psychology Interactive: Videos in Educational Psychology - 0 views

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    "EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY INTERACTIVE
    Audio-Video Materials Related to Educational Psychology"
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    A wealth of videos. Many are relevant to critical thinking and the scientific method.
David McGavock

Transom » Radiolab: An Appreciation by Ira Glass - 0 views

  • Real journalism – and by that I mean fact-based reporting – is getting trounced by commentary and opinion in all its forms, from Fox News to the political blogs to Jon Stewart. Everyone knows newspapers are in horrible trouble. TV news continually loses ratings. And one way we broadcast journalists can fight back and hold our audience is to sound like human beings on the air. Not know-it-all stiffs. One way the opinion guys kick our ass and appeal to an audience is that they talk like normal people, not like news robots speaking their stentorian news-speak. So I wish more broadcast journalism had such human narrators at its center. I think that would help fact-based journalism survive.
  • particularly the places where the story turns, or where the hosts are to take different sides of an issue, those moments are always improvised.
  • Thus the utterly effortless chitchat that floats you so cheerfully from plot point to character moment to scientific explanation to the next plot point is actually worked over second by second and beat by beat, over the course of weeks.
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  • Jad’s an Oberlin-trained composer so he’s always either writing the music to fit the stories on his show, the way a composer writes a film score, or he adapts other people’s music so well you can’t tell it wasn’t custom made.
  • And all that meticulous work is in the service of something that’s the opposite of careful and meticulous: this totally chatty, happy, loose, spontaneous-sounding conversation between Jad and Robert and their interviewees.
  • on Radiolab. They invented this insanely concise, entertaining way to tell that story, and they have no problem hurtling through it quickly.
  • For my part, I find it comforting that this level of excellence is so labor intensive that they only can make ten full shows a year (plus, sure, 16 “shorts” that they distribute on the Internet). If they could do an hour of this every week, I think I’d have to quit radio. What would be the point of continuing? How could anyone compete with that?
  • There was an entire hour recently that took up the provocative question: from an evolutionary perspective, why would it be useful for us, or for any creature, to ever help one another? To ever be good? That’s a really hard premise for stories with ideas and emotion and strong characters and interesting plot lines.
  • “In an almost comic attempt to make their job hard, the duo take only the most difficult subjects from science and philosophy: ‘Time,’ ‘Morality,’ ‘Memory and Forgetting,’ ‘Limits.’”
  • What’s striking is the ambition of all this. Jad and Robert seem to be inventing their effects and techniques as they go.
  • Sometimes it seems like the only people who understand how terrific the show is, are listeners.
  • Radiolab also does a beautiful job figuring out a mix of stories that’ll move us from one idea to the next over the course of an hour. Lots of their episodes have a coherent argument to them, an argument that takes an hour and several stories to lay out.
  • Radiolab: An Appreciation

    I marvel at Radiolab when I hear it. I feel jealous. Its co-creators Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich have digested all the storytelling and production tricks of everyone in public radio before them, invented some slick moves of their own, and ended up creating the rarest thing you can create in any medium: a new aesthetic.

  • A 2010 NPR/SmithGeiger survey of news consumers who rightly should be in the public radio audience, showed that one of the biggest reasons adults say they choose not to listen to public radio is that they’re put off by the tone. One survey respondent said: “This type of story could be interesting, but the reporter’s voice and intonation is soooo affected, upper class, wasp, Ph.D. student-like, it detracts from the story.
  • This information is presented quickly and cheerfully. There’s a bounce to the whole thing. Music plays behind. Jad looks at a map, as he’s talking to Laura, naming the cities the balloon passed on its flight across England. It’s visual. Do I need to explain here that part of making great radio is remembering that you always need to give the audience things to look at?
  • All this banter also helps them solve a storytelling problem
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    Radiolab: An Appreciation

    I marvel at Radiolab when I hear it. I feel jealous. Its co-creators Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich have digested all the storytelling and production tricks of everyone in public radio before them, invented some slick moves of their own, and ended up creating the rarest thing you can create in any medium: a new aesthetic.
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    Telling a story - capturing the attention and curiosity of people. Sparking our humanity.
David McGavock

Our mission - Gapminder.org - 0 views

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    "About Gapminder

    Fighting the most devastating myths by building a fact-based world view that everyone understands.

    Gapminder is a non-profit venture - a modern "museum" on the Internet - promoting sustainable global development and achievement of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals."
David McGavock

critical-thinking - home - 3 views

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    "Welcome to the Critical Thinking Compendium!

    Join Howard Rheingold and other noted educators in creating a world-class resource for teaching critical thinking and Internet literacies."
Charles van der Haegen

Internet Society (ISOC) All About The Internet: Legal Guide - 1 views

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    "About the Internet
    Histories of the Internet

    ISOC has gathered links and resources on a range of important Internet topics. Please explore this collection of background material.
    Internet Scenario The Internet Society has developed four future Internet scenarios that reveal plausible courses of events that could impact the health of the Internet in the future.

    All about the History of the Internet. Articles from various organisations and personalities. Read more ...
    Guide to Internet Law

    The Internet Society provides this guide as a public service for all interested parties. The guide offers links to many useful legal research sites on the Internet, along with brief descriptions. Read more ...
    Market Research/Statistics

    Statistics, surveys, and Market research regarding the Internet. Read more ...
    About the Internet Learn more about the Internet
    Infrastructure

    Descriptions of the Internet's infrastructure. How is the Internet organised? What are the bodies involved at different levels? Read more ...
    Internet Code of Conduct

    Guidelines on conduct and use of the Internet. Read more "
David McGavock

How to hack RSS to Reduce Information Overload - 0 views

  • There is more information available in the world than any one person could hope to consume
  • There is more information available in the world than any one person could hope to consume
  • but most of that information is uninteresting, out of date, inaccurate, or not relevant for you.
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  • There is more information available in the world than any one person could hope to consume
  • There is more information available in the world than any one person could hope to consume
  • The key to reducing information overload is to more efficiently find the data you want among the information that you don’t care about.
  • at about the blogs where one in five or one in 10 posts are relevant for you?
  • the real magic is in filtering.
  • which lets me filter an RSS feed using various criteria: URL, author, date, content and more. 
  • and my some blogs filtered for just the best posts using PostRank.
  • The best thing about PostRank is that you can get an RSS feed of just the best posts from a particular publisher, and that feed then includes the PostRank score,
  • you can do even more hacking on the PostRank RSS feed using Yahoo Pipes.
  • Another technique that helps me to consume information more efficiently is to modify the format of many of my RSS feeds
  • By bringing more details into the title, I can avoid spending time clicking to get more information.
  • The final trick is to use Web APIs to gather additional data
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    There is more information available in the world than any one person could hope to consume (hundreds of exabytes of data),
    but most of that information is uninteresting, out of date, inaccurate, or not relevant for you.

    The key to reducing information overload is to more efficiently find the data you want among the information that you don't care about.
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