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Lisa M Lane

Accessible Syllabus - 0 views

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    lots of tips!
Lisa M Lane

http://www.touchcast.com/ - 2 views

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    Video-making app pulling in the web.
Lisa M Lane

What Would Paulo Freire Think of Blackboard: Critical Pedagogy in an Age of Online Lear... - 1 views

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    Excellent article about applying Freire to online
Lisa M Lane

Best Practices in Online Teaching (Larry Ragan) - 3 views

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    Short book on how to, good examples and advice,based on Penn State training sessions
Lisa M Lane

Social Media for Learning and Teaching Undergraduate Sciences: Good Practice Guidelines... - 2 views

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    Experiment set up advanced students to do six problem-solving simulations as set groups in Facebook. Groups set up and case scenarios posted by faculty. All students had to sign documents that it was OK to use Facebook, and university was on board.

    Abstract: "In 2013, Facebook was used in learning and teaching clinical problem solving in a Pathology and a Clinical Sciences course delivered at a South Australian university. It involved first- and second-year Medical Radiation students and second-year Nursing students, Of the 152 students enrolled in the Pathology course, there were 148 students who participated in the Facebook group. Of the 148 students, 61 (41%) completed the invited post-intervention questionnaire. At the same time, all 17 nursing students enrolled in a science course at the regional campus of the same university participated in the Facebook initiative, however, only 10 (59%) completed the post-intervention questionnaire. A good practice and checklist were developed from the post-intervention evaluations, which consisted of 25 Likert- and open-type questions. Both student cohorts found the use of Facebook beneficial for them in terms of providing an innovative way of learning; fostering greater interaction amongst co-students and staff; and effectively engaging them with the content of courses. The importance of clear communication of goals and objectives to students was identified from student comments. Six good practice principles were identified relating to: goals and objectives, expectations, communication, engagement with the course content, active participation, and learning environment."

    "Moreover, it increased students' interest in the subject (66%; 100%), provided opportunities for greater interaction with the lecturer (97%; 100%), facilitated learning with peers (92%; 100%), learning from peers (95%; 90%), and working with others (87%; 100%). Furthermore, while the graded group activity was concluded the Facebook group and Facebook
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    This was a pretty interest read. I applied for a job back in 2010 where I proposed using Facebook groups to add to teaching engagement, so it was good to read a positive outcome of the experiment. Wonder if any POT-ers are willing to give it a go.
Lisa M Lane

Office Mix - 2 views

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    for Powerpoint, to go interactive
Lisa M Lane

Boton & Gregory 2015 ERIC - Minimizing Attrition in Online Degree Courses, Journal of E... - 1 views

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    2015
    "Results provide a range of strategies that can be applied by lecturers to increase engagement and minimize online attrition." 

    Considers high retention to be 70% and up, surveyed online core faculty (18) in six countries who had high retention to see what they did. Most use multimedia, have good online presence, engage students in problem solving, have "real-life" situation activities, and have challenging collaboration assignments.

    61% used constructivist/connectivist pedagogy. Almost all considered themselves expert at using the LMS.
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    2015
    "Results provide a range of strategies that can be applied by lecturers to increase engagement and minimize online attrition." 
    I didn't see much useful here
Lisa M Lane

Lamer 2009 - Where's Walter? Adjunct Outreach Strategies to Bridge the Virtual Distance... - 1 views

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    "There are hundreds of studies that address "no significant difference" in the quality of online versus on-ground instruction, yet it is clearly the instructor who makes the difference. While there is considerable research on student retention practices for university recruitment and enrollment departments, there seems to be little written on student outreach and retention strategies for online adjuncts. This paper is based on existing research on the philosophies of adult education, a review of current literature related to online education and the writer's own eight years of experience teaching online at for-profit universities as a baseline for offering online adjuncts five adjunct outreach strategies to bridge the virtual distance and increase student retention."

    Techniques:
    1. quick instructor feedback
    2. be tech savvy
    3. use student's names
    4. promote interaction, collaboration, teamwork
    5. have good online personality

    Does not actually show increase in retention.
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    There are hundreds of studies that address "no significant difference" in the quality of online versus on-ground instruction, yet it is clearly the instructor who makes the difference. While there is considerable research on student retention practices for university recruitment and enrollment departments, there seems to be little written on student outreach and retention strategies for online adjuncts. This paper is based on existing research on the philosophies of adult education, a review of current literature related to online education and the writer's own eight years of experience teaching online at for-profit universities as a baseline for offering online adjuncts five adjunct outreach strategies to bridge the virtual distance and increase student retention.
Lisa M Lane

ERIC - What Do Unsuccessful Online Students Want Us to Know?, Journal of Asynchronous L... - 1 views

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    "The combined responses for the three surveys indicated that the number one reason why students felt that they were not successful in their online course was because they "got behind and couldn't catch up.""
Laura Paciorek

ERIC - Teaching Presence in Online Education: From the Instructor\'s Point of View, Onl... - 5 views

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    The purpose of this mixed methods research was to look at the creation of teaching presence from the vantage point of a "lone ranger" instructor (Anderson, 2004).

    "There was minimal evidence from this study that demonstrated that creating a greater sense of teaching presence in the online classroom was an effective use of the instructor's time and efforts."
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    HumanMOOC's first section is on "instructor presence" ~ many hangouts, twitter conversations on #HumanMOOC hashtag, blog posts. I

    Week 1, instructor presence, http://humanmooc.com/syllabus/guide/week-1/

    https://www.diigo.com/user/vcvaile/HumanMOOC

    I had just been thinking that I should share POTcert syllabus, materials with the other participants
Lisa M Lane

Relationships among Faculty Training, Faculty Degree, Faculty Longevity, and Student Sa... - 1 views

  • The researchers were intrigued that faculty with only a master's degree overall outperformed terminally degreed faculty on post-course student surveys. Based on early qualitative indicators, students seemingly experience higher levels of instructor presence and engagement from faculty without a terminal degree. Because universities often emphasize high ratios of terminally degreed faculty, further research is needed to determine whether this emphasis is misguided based these preliminary findings.

    Professional development is heralded as an important factor in faculty growth. The researchers set out to examine whether professional development directly affected student satisfaction. This was not the case. The research reveals that administrators should use professional development as a tool for faculty retention rather than a driver of student satisfaction. This study's findings show that faculty longevity leads to student satisfaction. The investment in professional development, then, is well worth the cost if it promotes faculty retention.
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    How long faculty have been teaching is the most important factor in student satisfaction. From the conclusion:

    "The researchers were intrigued that faculty with only a master's degree overall outperformed terminally degreed faculty on post-course student surveys. Based on early qualitative indicators, students seemingly experience higher levels of instructor presence and engagement from faculty without a terminal degree. Because universities often emphasize high ratios of terminally degreed faculty, further research is needed to determine whether this emphasis is misguided based these preliminary findings.

    Professional development is heralded as an important factor in faculty growth. The researchers set out to examine whether professional development directly affected student satisfaction. This was not the case. The research reveals that administrators should use professional development as a tool for faculty retention rather than a driver of student satisfaction. This study's findings show that faculty longevity leads to student satisfaction. The investment in professional development, then, is well worth the cost if it promotes faculty retention."
Lisa M Lane

Expert Reflections on Effective Online Instruction: Importance of Course Content - 1 views

  • One well-received type of content is video lectures in which instructors themselves present or narrate in their own unique styles
  • Interactive course notes
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    Hey, content is important!

    "The discussion thus far indicates that there is a general similarity between the themes that emerged from the literature review on best practices and the analysis of the narratives of the USG award nominees. However, it is also significant to note that course content was emphasized more heavily in the reflective teaching philosophy statements than was evidenced within the literature. Such a difference might be expected since the nominees for this award are being recognized for their ability to connect theory to practice, and their practice is tied specifically to content-driven courses. The relatively limited emphasis on content within the literature versus its pervasiveness within the teaching statements of the USG award nominees suggests a need for expanded discussion of course content in online courses that is relevant, accessible, and rigorous."
Lisa M Lane

New Prairie Press - Adult Education Research Conference: Faculty Perception of "Presenc... - 2 views

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    "Like students, faculty also experience isolation in the online learning environment. This session presents the findings of a pilot study into faculty sense of alienation and the strategies that faculty have employed to "be there" and "be together" with their students in the online environment."

    "The majority of participants in this study were, however, trying to recreate the physical classroom within the online environment. They were assessing their performance online in comparison to their performance within the traditional classroom and in this comparison they found the online environment lacking. While they articulated the advantages of the online environment, including increased participation by all students, they were primarily perceiving and defining presence and engagement in terms of physical interaction."
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    Been reading about emotional intelligence* and need to see if "transactional distance" addresses what I'm thinking. As a pro at understanding isolation I can understand the disconnect from both sides. My "theory" is to first toss away as much authority as you can and start out as just a friendly and familiar person. For some reason this presumption of knowing the the other person allows me to recognize them as someone I can help--WANT to help.

    There's something about being supportive that's a mix of craft and genuine feeling and it may from listening for authenticity. Anyway, as someone in the process of disconnecting from the human component of my medical care need and switching back to being looked after by robots I do know what alienates me.

    Thanks to Laura for getting me started thinking about this again.

    *The Hidden Genius of Emotion, Lifespan Transformations of Personality" Carol Magai and Jeannette Haviland-Jones.

    Later the source paper on Transactional Distance:
    Moore, M. G. (1993). Theory of transactional distance. Theoretical principles of distance education, 22.
    Full Text PDF here http://www.c3l.uni-oldenburg.de/cde/found/moore93.pdf

    Quote from early into the paper on the non-technological considerations in distance learning:
    "The special teaching procedures fall into two clusters; in addition a third cluster of variables describes the behaviours of learners. The extent of transactional distance in an educational programme is a function of these three sets of variables. These are not technological or communications variables, but variables in teaching and in learning and in the interaction of teaching and learning.
    These clusters of variables are named
    Dialogue,
    Structure, and
    Learner Autonomy."
    more later
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    Downloaded to read for later, this is certainly one of the topics, "Instructor Presence" that interests me most in my assessment of my own online teaching. Scott's comment also intrigues me. Thoughts churning...can't wait to read this!
Maha Abdelmoneim

Home : Inform - 1 views

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    Hi Maha, looks like an interesting program. I can think of a lot of uses--Thanks!
Lisa M Lane

Factors Influencing Adult Learners' Decision to Drop Out or Persist in Online Learning ... - 1 views

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    From abstract: "Dropouts and persistent learners showed statistical differences in perceptions of family and organizational support, and satisfaction and relevance. It was also shown that the theoretical framework, which includes family support, organizational support, satisfaction, and relevance in addition to individual characteristics, is able to predict learners' decision to drop out or persist. Organizational support and relevance were shown to be particularly predictive. The results imply that lower dropout rates can be achieved if online program developers or instructors find ways to enhance the relevance of the course. It also implies that adult learners need to be supported by their organizations in order for them to finish online courses that they register for."

    The conclusion here insists that despite the significance of internal factors, we must make our classes more interesting and more relevant to students' current lives.: " In order to enhance satisfaction as a way to motivate online learners, rewards such as a completion certificate, praise, and promotion should be given to learners. "

    The focus is clearly on satisfaction rather than academic rigor or course quality.
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    From abstract: "Dropouts and persistent learners showed statistical differences in perceptions of family and organizational support, and satisfaction and relevance. It was also shown that the theoretical framework, which includes family support, organizational support, satisfaction, and relevance in addition to individual characteristics, is able to predict learners' decision to drop out or persist. Organizational support and relevance were shown to be particularly predictive. The results imply that lower dropout rates can be achieved if online program developers or instructors find ways to enhance the relevance of the course. It also implies that adult learners need to be supported by their organizations in order for them to finish online courses that they register for."
Lisa M Lane

The Role of Enrollment Choice in Online Education: Course Selection Rationale and Cours... - 1 views

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    Abstract: "There is well-documented evidence that online retention rates are lower than face-to-face retention rates. However, most past research on online retention focuses on student characteristics, with little knowledge existing on the impact of course type. This study uses a matched sample of 2,330 students at a large urban community college to analyze two key course-level factors which may be impacting online retention: the student's reason for taking the course (as an elective or a requirement) and course difficulty level. The results of this study indicate that the online modality increases dropout risk in courses that are taken as an elective or distributional requirement, particularly for lower-level courses. The findings suggest that in the online environment, the student's reason for course enrollment may be considered a risk indicator and that focused learner support targeted at particular course types may be needed to increase online persistence and retention."

    Lower-level distribution requirement retention: 64.5% versus 75.5% onsite
    Lower-level elective retention: 52.1% versus 74.3% onsite
    Lower-level major requirement: 81.8% versus 75.5% onsite
Lisa M Lane

Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures ( - 1 views

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    Szpunar, K. K., Khan, N. &, & Schacter, D. L. (2013). Interpolated memory tests reduce mind wandering and improve learning of online lectures. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online April 1, 2013.

    Students minds wander during lecture. Quizzes interspersed in lecture help.
Lisa M Lane

Curtailing Dropouts at Online Universities - US News - 1 views

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    "The Kennesaw State professors tested the effectiveness of common online retention practices such as welcome E-mails, phone calls from professors, and quizzes on the syllabus with online students in some courses. By the end of the courses, the retention rate for the control and treatment groups were nearly identical: 69 and 70 percent, respectively. "
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