Skip to main content

Home/ Groups/ Online Teaching Group
Lisa M Lane

Wakelet - 0 views

shared by Lisa M Lane on 11 Dec 18 - No Cached
  •  
    like Pinterest, only cooler looking
Lisa M Lane

E-Teaching in Higher Education: An Essential Prerequisite for E-Learning | Guri-Rosenbl... - 1 views

  • Many students were found to be inept and ill-prepared when it came to evaluating information they encountered from the Internet and social media sources.
  • highlight the importance of defining clearly the roles of teachers in various online study environments, and design appropriate training and support mechanisms for that purpose
  • Most academic faculty are not well-equipped to guide students in developing the digital competencies they need
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • work overload in preparing curricula suited for online learning, which leads also to some extent to feelings of burnout
  • They will need to learn how to collaborate in a team framework with editors, instructional designers, television producers, computer experts, graphic production personnel, as well as with other colleagues in developing and delivering their courses
  • Lowering the amount of teaching hours required by professors in different higher education systems, as well as compensating them by additional bonuses is of great importance for encouraging professors to devote time for upgrading their digital skills
  •  
    "This article aims to highlight the importance of defining clearly the roles of teachers in various online study environments, and design appropriate training and support mechanisms for that purpose. It starts with briefly explaining why most students, particularly at the undergraduate level, are unable and/or unwilling to study by themselves without expert teachers to guide their knowledge construction, discusses the problematics of digital literacy of teachers, examines the main reasons for the reluctance of many academics nowadays to utilize the technologies more fully in their teaching, and concludes by recommending some strategies for incorporating more fully the huge array of the technologies' capabilities in higher education learning/teaching encounters."
Lisa M Lane

Promoting Online Learner Self-Efficacy through Instructional Strategies and Course Supp... - 1 views

  •  
    Analysis of the responses indicated that self-efficacy was promoted through high-engagement instructional strategies such as interactive learning objects, instructor feedback, and activities requiring application of lesson content. Self-efficacy was promoted when a variety of instructional strategies were available. Course supports, such as assistance using the library, counseling services, and technical assistance with the Learning Management System (LMS) were available, but infrequently used. Informal supports, such as communication with the instructor and peers, were pervasively used and were strong supports of self-efficacy.
Lisa M Lane

Technology and Student Retention in Online Courses 2017 - 1 views

  •  
    Scarpin, Mondini, Scarpin
Lisa M Lane

Flexible learning versus classroom lecture : a content analysis of undergraduate nursin... - 0 views

  •  
    "Background: The ongoing difficulty that nursing educators face is managing finite class time and limited instructor-student interactions to achieve balance between discourse and active learning. To complicate this predicament, technology has infiltrated all aspects of daily life demanding that education must also meet the growing expectation of students to incorporate technology into curriculum. One approach that addresses this need is the flipped classroom (FC) format, which remains operationally ill-defined and the understanding of its effects on higher-level thinking are still nascent. Aim: The purpose of this study is to explore the differences in learning between the FC format compared to the traditional classroom lecture (TL) in the context of an undergraduate nursing course. Methods: A content analysis was performed on a previous study conducted in 2015. Concept maps were used to evaluate data from transcripts of undergraduate nursing students discussing a case scenario in either a TL or FC format. Results: When comparing FC and TL groups, FC groups had a more complex concept map morphology and greater amount of identified subcategories and links. The FC groups exhibited more higher order thinking concepts compared to the TL cohort. An unexpected finding was the emergence of discussion tangents across both the FC groups and the TL cohort. Conclusion: Flipped classrooms have a place in the gamut of pedagogical approaches and this study demonstrates that the FC approach enhances student learning and aids in the development of higher-level thinking. "
1 - 20 of 1214 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page