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Melissa Hughes

Keystone compromise faces up to economic and climactic realities - Toronto Star - March... - 0 views

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    "The expansion of the Keystone XL pipeline has become a lightning rod for the battle between long-term climate concerns and shorter-term economic benefit. Opponents say Canada's tarsands are one of the world's most carbon-intensive and environmentally destructive sources of oil. Proponents argue they're a politically stable source of oil in a world fraught with risk. Both are correct. A compromise on Keystone is essential if Canada is to become a responsible energy superpower in the complex 21st century world of carbon constraints.
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Karen Schulman Dupuis

InsuranceHotline.com and InsurEye Inc. Join Forces to Deliver More Insights to Consumer... - 0 views

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    In an effort to help Canadians make informed decisions about the type of credit card they use, InsuranceHotline.com has partnered with InsurEye Inc. to promote its Credit Card Navigator tool. This online tool is free to use and allows consumers to compare credit cards and the insurance coverage each card offers.
Miri Katz

Canada slips further in innovation rankings - 0 views

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    Canada is now a mid-level player in the global innovation race, passed by rising powers China and South Korea in some categories and falling further behind long-time rivals such as the United States, Germany, Norway and Sweden.
Cathy Bogaart

Time for Canada to own the entrepreneurial podium - The Globe and Mail, Mar 16, 2011 - 0 views

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    MaRS CEO, Ilse Treurnicht, and Board Member, John Manley, are both interviewed for the Action Canada report. This report recommends a national strategy for "owning the podium" in entrepreneurship.
Cathy Bogaart

Q&A with Tom Rand: Creating jobs through clean-energy investment | SmartBlog on Leadership - 0 views

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    Bryan McBournie interviews MaRS cleantech practice lead, Tom Rand, about why investing in clean energy is so important. It ties directly into the overall mission of MaRS: creating jobs through innovation and entrepreneurship.
Cathy Bogaart

Sub-Saharan Africa's big move up - Financial Post, March 12, 2011 - 0 views

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    Once the undisputed worst economic region in the world, sub-Saharan Africa is now one of the fastest-growing areas on the planet and despite the turmoil in North Africa, has become one of the most incredible success stories of the global economy.

    This coming week the "Africa Rising" conference at MaRS in will showcase a number of global business leaders discussing entrepreneurial opportunities in Africa.
Cathy Bogaart

Voting for Innovation « Blog by Earl Miller | Vote Toronto 2010 - 0 views

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    Earl Miller, Director, Strategic Partnerships at MaRS, writes on the Toronto Board of Trade about the upcoming mayoral debate at MaRS. In the aftermath of a global financial crisis, cities are looking for ways to generate growth. Find out how the mayoral candidates will support that growth at the September 8th debate at MaRS.
Cathy Bogaart

Why We Need More Funding for Big Science - 0 views

  • Why We Need More Funding for Big Science
  • fundamental research and technological development
  • Often wildly speculative, expensive, and with no explicit commercial purpose, this research nonetheless has a powerful spillover effect in the long term.
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  • We're riding on innovations that happened 20, 30, 40 years ago. One has to keep having ideas."
  • "You cannot have innovation without a fount of new knowledge -- and that is what research is about,"
  • has laid the foundation for much of America's economic growth over the past half a century.
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    R&D has laid the foundation for economic growth, giving us fuel cells, computer databases, the Internet, satellite navigation -- unexpected spillovers of R&D funding. To stay competitive in the innovative industries, government funding, it is argued, is required to continue.
Assunta Krehl

Miller's criticism of budget gets short shrift - The Globe and Mail - March 6, 2010 - 0 views

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    The Federal Budget has been released on March 4th. Flaherty points to all, Ottawa has already done for city, while economist says era of fiscal restraint makes for 'very few winners.' Ilse Treurnicht, CEO, MaRS Discovery District said "the federal government's renewed cash promises for science and technology innovation allows research-heavy Toronto to "punch above its weight" when it comes to taking advantage of those funds, including money for the genome project."
Assunta Krehl

Samsung and the Economy - The Agenda - February 2, 2010 - 0 views

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    Watch MaRS cleantech advisor and practice lead, Tom Rand, as he appears on a panel on TVO's The Agenda with Steve Paikin. The issue: the Samsung deal - good for Ontarians or not?

    Other panelists on the Feb 2, 2010, show include: Randall Denley from the Ottawa Citizen; Kristopher Stevens from the Ontario Sustainable Energy Association; and Norm Rubin from Energy Probe.
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    With Steve Pakin host of The Agenda, Norm Rubin, Director of Nuclear Research, Randall Denley, Columnist with the Ottawa Citizen, Tom Rand, Cleantech Lead at the MaRS Discovery District, and Kristopher Stevens, Executive Director of the Ontario Sustainable Energy Association discuss the harnessing nature to boost Ontario's economy--what the Samsung deal means for Ontario.
Tim T

Beijing plays hardball with Washington - thestar.com - 0 views

  • Western countries were preparing for a more assertive China to emerge over the next decade. No one thought it would happen virtually overnight.
  • "Before the (Beijing) Olympics everyone believed it was going to be gradual. People would have time to adapt. But over the past 18 months things have just developed so rapidly."
  • China's ability to survive and thrive through the financial crisis left many Chinese feeling their system is just better, says Stubbe Ostergaard
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  • While many Western countries experienced negative growth last year, China registered a jaw-dropping 8.7 per cent increase. Though much of it was achieved by a generous stimulus package, it maintained jobs and, in the end, helped fuel feelings of superiority.
  • Economic power is inexorably shifting away from the U.S. and towards China, he says, and coming with it is power and influence.

    "China is stronger now. It's more influential," says Yao. "And the Chinese banking sector looks better than the Western banking system."

  • "Saving face matters to the Chinese," he says. "But if you slap the Chinese face once, twice, three times, four times – that's too much."

    That language underlines the stark differences in the two nations' perception of issues such as Taiwan, Tibet and the Dalai Lama.

  • "China has risen to a different place. ... It's clearly an unsettling stage in U.S.-China relations, a new paradigm. No one is really sure how it's going to shake out."
Tim T

As U.S. eases protectionism, Canada moves a step closer to economic union - The Globe a... - 0 views

  • But to get that access, Canadian provinces must open their own markets to outside governments, both foreign and domestic, seeking to bid on provincial and municipal contracts. In Ontario's case, $10-billion worth of work will be open to all comers.
  • The EU enjoys internal free trade, and wants access to provincial as well as national markets.
Tim T

County facing 'worst' budget scenario - LA Daily News - 1 views

  • 2010-11 "will probably be the worst year for county services in recent history."
  • Hoping to close a $19.9 billion budget gap over the next 18 months
  • governor on Friday proposed $8.5 billion in cuts in health and social services and $4.5 billion in alternative funding and fund shifts
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  • If the federal government doesn't provide the state with an additional $6.9 billion requested by Schwarzenegger, the governor's budget calls for eliminating In-Home Supportive Services, CalWORKS welfare and Healthy Families programs, which provides services to millions of Californians.
  • "There are recommendations to cut more than $2.9 billion from social service programs," McIntosh said. "This action alone will further push families into poverty, putting them in a dire situation from which they may never recover."
  • Elimination of these programs will, in turn, impact other areas as well, including the criminal justice system, the homeless population and county welfare rolls. Elimination of the IHSS and CalWORKS programs would put 450,000 people out of work.
Tim T

Los Angeles Hires a Jobs Chief - WSJ.com - 0 views

  • Los Angeles Hires a Jobs Chief
  • unemployment stuck above 12%
  • Beutner will have broad powers. About half of city government departments -- from the Port of Los Angeles to the city's sprawling Department of Water and Power utility -- will report to him
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  • In a letter Mr. Villaraigosa sent to Mr. Beutner when hiring him, the mayor said, "I recognize we need a top to bottom revitalization and refocus of our economic development team here at City Hall to make certain job creation is the overarching focus at all levels and in all offices and departments."
  • Chief Deputy Mayor Jay Carson. "We have to view every decision we make through the prism of job creation."
  • Southern California's economy has been among the hardest hit in the country. The area's housing market was one of the first to collapse. And in Los Angeles, mainstays such as the film industry have suffered as other states woo productions away with rich tax incentives
  • Last week, the city was dealt a psychological blow when Northrop Grumman Corp., the last major firm of the region's once-dominant aerospace industry, announced it was moving its headquarters to the Washington, D.C. area
  • Los Angeles has slashed services as it tries to close an $80 million budget gap
  • His annual salary is $1.
  • Some major stores that sell big-ticket items have moved to neighboring cities to avoid the high cost and difficulty of doing business there, such as delays in obtaining building permits, and a range of fees and taxes higher than most other cities in the area, business leaders said.
  • "The hardest thing is going to be to change the mindset here," Mr. Beutner said. "For the first time in a long time the city is going to be forced to change the way it does things. The most fundamental thing is to change the mindset of those who work in the city [government]. We serve business. They're our customers as opposed to the other way around."
Tim T

The Disposable Worker - BusinessWeek - 0 views

  • LiveOps, a Santa Clara (Calif.) provider of call-center workers
  • from Eastman Kodak (EK) and Pizza Hut (YUM) to infomercial behemoth Tristar Products. She's paid by the minute—25 cents—but only for the time she's actually on the phone with customers
  • independent agent, Smith has no health insurance, no retirement benefits, no sick days, no vacation, no severance, and no access to unemployment insurance
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  • some economists predict it will be years, not months, before employees regain any semblance of bargaining power
  • this recession's unusual ferocity has accelerated trends—including offshoring, automation, the decline of labor unions' influence, new management techniques, and regulatory changes
  • forecast for the next five to 10 years: more of the same, with paltry pay gains, worsening working conditions, and little job security. Right on up to the C-suite, more jobs will be freelance and temporary, and even seemingly permanent positions will be at greater risk
  • We're all temps now.
  • the brutal recession has prompted more companies to create just-in-time labor forces that can be turned on and off like a spigot
  • Employers are trying to get rid of all fixed costs
  • Everything is variable
  • people who graduated from college in a recession earn 2.5% less than if they had graduated in more prosperous times, research has shown
  • Diminishing job security is also widening the gap between the highest- and lowest-paid workers. At the top, people with sought-after skills can earn more by jumping from assignment to assignment than they can by sticking with one company. But for the least educated, who have no special skills to sell, the new deal for labor offers nothing but downside.
  • All the employees had just stopped working
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