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Katy Vance

Reimagining Learning, Literacy, and Libraries: A Few Moments with Amy Eshleman | DMLcentral - 2 views

  • So we slowly encouraged him to participate in creating content around games. He began writing game reviews and learned how to build new levels for games. He started creating a real community around games and contributing to that knowledge space. He was blogging about games but also challenged himself to become a better writer. He was part of a group of gamers that decided they wanted to design and build a prototype game controller, and by working with our mentors, they learned about the principles of design and actually built a prototype.
  • We wanted a space that had a real curriculum. Even little things like having food in the space were so important in the design. It’s their space and they are not shy about talking to us about the resources they want to see. They drive what we do. Just recently we changed the way we designed the geeking out part of YOUmedia -- the more formal learning opportunities -- to make it fit what the youth were interested in instead of what we thought they were interested in. We offer project-based workshops to provide context for the work, but it’s up to them on how they decide to enter into those projects.
    • Katy Vance
       
      This is just a test.
    • Katy Vance
       
      Testing!
  • It turns to another conversation we were just having about how we balance a kid who's spending every night in YOUmedia with needing to get his homework done. Clearly he wants to learn in the way he is learning in YOUmedia. I think it is up to us to work with our schools so we can think of new ways to illustrate achievement and skills. Working on things such as a badge system could help make that connection back to the classroom.
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  •  While reading Toni Morrison’s book, A Mercy, we had the designers redesign the book jacket; we had the musicians make beats and spoken word artists put a piece behind that music; and we had photographers reimagine scenes in the book that were meaningful to them. We took this model and made a curriculum around it. Kids talk about how they worked collaboratively to create really beautiful pieces of art around the themes in the book
  •  
    So we slowly encouraged him to participate in creating content around games. He began writing game reviews and learned how to build new levels for games. He started creating a real community around games and contributing to that knowledge space. He was blogging about games but also challenged himself to become a better writer. He was part of a group of gamers that decided they wanted to design and build a prototype game controller, and by working with our mentors, they learned about the principles of design and actually built a prototype.
Katy Vance

» Why Gamify and What to Avoid in Library Gamification ACRL TechConnect Blog - 2 views

  • Third, a game that is organization-centered rather than user-centered can be worse than no game at all. A game with organization-centered design uses external rewards to increase the organization’s bottom line in the short term.3 Games designed this way attempt to control behavior with rewards. Once users feel the game is playing them rather than they are playing the game, however, they are likely to have a negative feeling towards the game and the organization. 
  • In this early stage of gamification, it will be useful to remember that gamification doesn’t necessarily require complicated technology or huge investment. For example, you can run a successful game in your library instruction class with a pencil and paper. How about rewarding your library patrons who write to your library’s Facebook page and get most “likes” by other patrons? Or perhaps, a library can surprise and delight the first library patron who checks in your library’s Foursquare or Yelp page by offering a free coffee coupon at the library coffeeshop or simply awarding the Early-Bird badge? In gamification, imagination and creativity can go a long way
Katy Vance

This Changes Everything: iPhone's Five-Year Gaming Revolution | GamesIndustry International - 0 views

  • With expensive consoles stuck in long cycles, iPhone has transformed from a poor phone with no third-party content into a retina-screened gaming powerhouse with over half a million apps to choose from in less time than it took Sony to make Gran Turismo 5.
  • In this context a game has mere seconds to impress before it is banished back into the ether and damned with a one-star review. Needless to say, that is not a friendly environment for great ideas that need a little explaining to flourish.
    • Katy Vance
       
      This si key- how do we design games (and lessons for that matter) that are self-evident in terms of how to play them?
  • You don't reach a billion based on a spectacularly unoriginal physics game and some cartoon birds alone. It needed the ecosystem, installed base and cool cultural cachet of Apple.
    • Katy Vance
       
      You know, this makes me think about the fact that we haven't really discussed the tech factors involved in gaming.  I know lots of games in McGonigal's book don't require tech, but I think I will need technology to manage large numbers of students in a library.
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    But you know what the truly amazing aspect of iPhone's gaming revolution is? That it happened without Apple even really trying. The company hasn't the slightest interest in making games; it just created the right platform, delivery mechanism and economics for them in the eyes - and hands - of consumers.
Katy Vance

Gamification doesn't exist | Jessica Vallance - User Experience Designer - 0 views

  • . People are motivated by progress. People are motivated by social validation. These designs have just taken things people already want to do – learning stuff, going places, getting fit – and motivated people to do them more by making it easier for users to a) track their progess and b) tell other people what they’re doing.
  • The most important things about a game is that it offers an experience that is enjoyable in itself. If a game is designed well, people will play it just for the entertainment. Very few gamifcation examples seem to remember this, and so not many focus on creating a fantastic gaming experience as their priority, but there are some.
  • In his book Playful Design, John Ferrara talks about the game Foldit. The game gives users puzzles to complete based on protein folding and scientists examine the solutions provided by the highest scorers to see if there is anything that can be applied to real-life proteins. One of the solutions helped scientists to decipher the structure of an AIDs-causing monkey virus – remarkably, something they’d been trying to do for 15 years before they got Foldit players on the case
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    Interesting perspective on the idea that "gamification" doesn't exist, merely games or tasks made fun...
Katy Vance

TEDxBozeman - Paul Andersen - Classroom Game Design - YouTube - 0 views

  • Paul Andersen has been teaching science in Montana for the last eighteen years.  He explains how he is using elements of game design to improve learning in his AP Biology classroom.  Paul's science videos have been viewed millions of times by students around the world.  He was the 2011 Montana Teacher of the Year and he is currently a science teacher at Bozeman High School.  For more information on Paul's work visit http://www.bozemanscience.co
Katy Vance

Games for Learning - 0 views

  • Have students play and critique a video game for content accuracy (Civilization series).
    • Katy Vance
       
      I'd love to see this in a social studies class- design a civilization that best reflects day to day life in a country being studied.
  • Have students build and run their own amusement parks (Roller Coaster Tycoon) or cities (SimCity series).
    • Katy Vance
       
      Great for Science classes learning about physics!
  • . Games help people develop a disposition toward collaboration, problem-solving, communication, experimentation, and exploration of identities, all attributes that promote success in a rapidly-changing, information-based culture (2011 Horizon Report).
Lucas Gillispie

Games Learning Society - 0 views

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    The Games, Learning, and Society group is a collection of academic researchers, interactive media (or game) developers, and government and industry leaders who investigate how this medium operates, how it can be used to transform how we learn, and what this means for society. As such we seek to understand what cognitive work goes into playing Zelda, World of Warcraft, or Civilization, how these design features might be leveraged to improve learning via the design of learning systems, and how organizations such as schools will need to respond.
Lucas Gillispie

Teach with Portals - 0 views

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    Valve recently began collaborating with educators to develop game-related teaching tools that revolve around STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. We've created Teach With Portals as a destination for this partnership, providing free content and game design tools, as well as an interactive community for exchanging lessons and experiences.
Lucas Gillispie

iCivics | Free Lesson Plans and Games for Learning Civics - 0 views

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    Teachers, register for a free account and choose from a variety of specially-designed materials including games, lesson plans, and more to bring this year's election into your classroom!
Lucas Gillispie

ipodgamesforlearning - 1 views

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    This wiki is designed as a collaborative space for educators who are using the iPod Touch in the classroom. It specifically focuses on the use of game-based learning through the iPod Touch. Here, you'll find lessons and lesson ideas, information on specific iPod Touch games, and logistical considerations for classroom implementation.
Lucas Gillispie

Learning Games Network - 0 views

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    The Learning Games Network is a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade dedicated to the innovative design, research, and use of learning games.
Lucas Gillispie

Educational Innovator - 0 views

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    Lisa Dawley's (Boise State University) blog on games, virtual worlds, instructional design, gamification, and learning.
Lucas Gillispie

MorrowCraft - home - 0 views

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    Morrowcraft is a Wiki designed to document a Minecraft Multiplayer Server hosted by The Elisabeth Morrow School in Englewood, NJ. It's a virtual world built and inhabited by EMS students and faculty.
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