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David Wetzel

What is the Technology Footprint in Your Classroom? - 16 views

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    Strategies and techniques are provided regarding the benefits of using digital tools to support teaching and learning in any content area or grade level.
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    Great article, it's amazing to me how much technology has changed and improved the classroom and students' learning. Thanks for sharing.
David Wetzel

Making the Most of Wikis in Your Science or Math Classroom - 10 views

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    Wikis are the most popular Web 2.0 tool being used in science and math classrooms. Based on a survey of readers - 43 percent use them to support their teaching and student learning. A Wiki is appealing, encourages participation, supports collaboration, and promotes interaction by students who love to use teaching. By the way - this includes most students today!
Paul Beaufait

Essential Conditions (ISTE, 2015) - 12 views

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    "The ISTE Essential Conditions are the 14 critical elements necessary to effectively leverage technology for learning" (Essential conditions, ¶1, 2015.03.12).
IN PI

Horizon Project | nmc - 0 views

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    Horizon Report 08 - key trends on educational technology and its relevance to technology, learning and creative expression.
David Wetzel

Why Interactive White Boards are Used Ineffectively in Classrooms - 11 views

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    An interactive White Board (IWB) or SMART Board has the potential to deliver content better than traditional methods of teaching. Why? Because it provides multi-media functional interaction across audio, video, and computer media. It is also ideal for visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners. These qualities of an IWB also promote the dynamic delivery of content (if used to its full potential) in an engaging manner, which allows students to interact with science or math content their self. Examples include: * data manipulation * responding to data * even creating data So with all these attributes - "How are interactive white boards unsuccessfully used in science and math classrooms?" For the most part - not effectively!
David Wetzel

Little Known Ways to Integrate Wikis in Science Class - 13 views

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    Wiki pages are always a work in progress. The wiki is like a dynamic online science classroom which continually grows and changes. Applications for the use of Wikis in science classrooms is only limited by the creativeness of the teacher in support science teaching and student earning.
Julie Golden

Need your help! - 0 views

Please consider taking my survey. It is anonymous, so I won't be able to send a proper thank you. Please know that I will pay your kindness forward to another doctoral student in need and will send...

learningwithcomputers education learning online teaching web2.0 technology elearning edtech research

started by Julie Golden on 11 Sep 15 no follow-up yet
David Wetzel

Top 10 Online Tools for Teaching Science and Math - 18 views

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    Why use Web 2.0 tools in science and math classes? The primary reason is they facilitate access to input and interaction with content through reading, writing, listening, and speaking. These tools offer enormous advantages for science and math teachers, in terms of helping their students learn using Web 2.0 tools. For example: * Most of these tools can be edited from any computer connected to the Internet. Teachers can add, edit and delete information even during class time. * Students learn how to use these tools for academic purposes and, at the same time, can transfer their use to their personal lives and future professional careers. * RSS feeds allow students to access all the desired research information on one page. * Students learn to be autonomous in their learning process.
Paul Beaufait

Half an Hour: The Future of Online Learning: Ten Years On - 0 views

  • While we want to provide personalized attention, especially to submitted work, testing and grading, learning is still heavily dependent on the teacher. But because the teacher in turn is responsible for assembling, and often presenting, the materials to be learned, customization and personalization have not been practical. So we have adopted a model where small groups of people form a cohort, thus allowing the teacher to present the same material to more than one person at a time, while offering individualized interaction and assessment.
  • Though networks have always existed, modern communications technologies highlight their existence and given them a new robustness. Networks are distinct from groups in that they preserve individual autonomy and promote diversity of belief, purpose and methodology. In a network, however, people do not act as disassociated individuals, but rather, cooperate in a series of exchanges that can produce, not merely individual goods, but also social goods.
  • In the case of informal learning, however, the structure is much looser. People pursue their own objectives in their own way, while at the same time initiating and sustaining an ongoing dialogue with others pursuing similar objectives. Learning and discussion is not structured, but rather, is determined by the needs and interests of the participants.
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • it is not clear that an outcomes driven system is what students require; many valuable skills and aptitudes – art appreciation, for example – are not identifiable as an outcome. This becomes evident when we consider how learning is to be measured. In traditional learning, success is achieved not merely by passing the test but in some way being recognized as having achieved expertise. A test-only system is a coarse system of measurement for a complex achievement.
  • The products of our conversations are as concrete as test scores and grades. (Ryan, 2007) But, as the result of a complex and interactive process, they are much more complex, allowing not only for the measurement of learning, but also for the recognition of learning. As it becomes easier to simply see what a student can accomplish, the idea of a coarse-grained proxy, such as grades, will fade to the background.
  • Most educators, and most educational institutions, have not yet embraced the idea of flow and syndication in learning. They will – reluctantly – because it provides the learner with the means to manage and control his or her learning. They can keep unwanted content to a minimum (and this includes unwanted content from an institution). And they can manage many more sources – or content streams – using feed reader technology.RSS and related specifications will be one of the primary ways Personal Learning Environments connect with remote systems. To use a PLE will be essentially to immerse oneself in the flow of communications that constitutes a community of practice in some discipline or domain on the internet.
  • In the end, what will be evaluated is a complex portfolio of a student’s online activities. (Syverson & Slatin, 2006)
  • place independence means that real learning will occur in real environments, with the contributions of the students not being some artifice designed strictly for practice, but an actual contribution to the business or enterprise in question.
  • As it becomes more and more possible to teach oneself online, and even to demonstrate one’s achievement through productive membership in a community of practice, there will be greater demand for a formalized system of recognition, a way for people to demonstrate their competence in an area without having to go through a formal program of study in the area.
  • the major shift in instructional technology will be from systems centered on the educational institution to systems centered on the individual learner.
  • rather than the employment of a single system to accomplish all educational tasks, both instructors and learners will use a variety of different tools in combination with each other.
  • Automation allows us to more easily create and present content, to more easily form groups and collaborate, to more easily give tests and take surveys. This frees instructors to perform tasks that have been traditionally more difficult and time consuming – to relate to students on a personal basis, to offer coaching and moral support, to learn about and analyze a student’s inclinations and understandings.
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    Thanks for all of your inspiration!
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    "an epic, must-read article" according to Brian Lamb (A social layer for DSpace? 2008.11.19 http://weblogs.elearning.ubc.ca/brian/archives/049355.php)
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
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  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
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    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
Rakhi Roy

Tech News - 0 views

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    All new technology news here. All update technology news. There are about Computer, Mobile, Application, Android, i Pad latest technology news .
David Wetzel

6 Strategies for Using a Smart Board in Class: Transforming Teaching with Web 2.0 Tool Integration for all Learners - 24 views

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    Strategies and techniques are presented for incorporating interactive technology for connecting lesson concepts and engaging students in the learning process.
Ileana Visea

Prezi - 0 views

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    Absolutely awesome presentation tool. Some call it "the new power point". Powerful and engaging teaching tool.
Barbara Moose

Seven skills students desperately need - 0 views

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    At an education forum hosted by SETDA, keynote speaker Tony Wagner explained why teaching to the test is a mistake--and he listed seven 'survival skills' every student should have before graduating.
Barbara Moose

Education Week's Digital Directions: Tech Literacy Confusion - 0 views

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    A growing chorus of experts say schools should teach students to be proficient in "technology literacy"-but the definition of it is ambiguous.
Timeless Learntech

Equipped for Online Learning? - 0 views

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    Online Learning Shapes the Academic World Developments in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) have impacted all sectors of society- mainly the corporate organisations as well as the education sector. In higher education, application of ICTs in form of e-learning is already changing teaching and learning processes.
Debbie Nichols

The Newbie Guide to Google Search | Educational Technology Tips - 0 views

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    I was surprised. I learned things from this article. It can be projected in class to teach students also.
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