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Izzaty P.

7 Online Magazines for Kids That Are Worth a Read - 0 views

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    Children's magazines like their adult counterparts also have accompanying websites. A visitor who drops by won't be able to distinguish between an online magazine and a website (or blog). Most of the online versions of the children's magazines also publish the same content; partly if not all. Here are some that are worth a look and a read.
susana canelo

Magazine Publishing - Publish your Magazine, Podcast, Newsletter or Journal Online with Press Publisher - 0 views

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    Suggested by Nina while Fernanda Rodriguez was asking for tools to publish magazines online
Paul Beaufait

YouTube - How to create a magazine in Bloxi - 0 views

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    Carla recommended the Japan-based Edublog service, bloxi.jp, and I've found it every bit as accommodating as she said it was. When I Googled "bloxi" today, to bookmark my new blogs a Flock browser, this video showed up in the top five hits.
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    "This is a simple explanation for how to create a mag..." (YouTube description) - a tutorial for quick and easy set up of a personal blog, and then another blog to use as a magazine site
mbarek Akaddar

TOPICS Online Magazine | ESL/EFL | Sandy Peters and Thomas Peters - 6 views

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    Online Magazine for Learners of English
susana canelo

Issuu - You Publish - 0 views

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    A tool suggested by Ronaldo. Great to publish magazines on line
Christine Bauer-Ramazani

Top 10 Sites for Creating a Chart or Graph - 21 views

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    from Tech&Learning magazine
Christine Bauer-Ramazani

Top 10 Sites for Educational Apps - 21 views

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    from Tech&Learning magazine, Jan. 2012
Paul Beaufait

elearnspace: The Secrets of Storytelling: Why We Love a Good Yarn - 0 views

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    Introduces a September 18, 2008 [sic] article from Scientific American Mind Magazine: The Secrets of Storytelling: Why We Love a Good Yarn http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=the-secrets-of-storytelling
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    George Siemens ponders whether: "scientific method [is] a testament to the power of a logical framework to banish myth and superstition," and "how...emotional and cognitive effects of a narrative influence our beliefs and real-world decisions" (2008.08.25).
Holly Dilatush

Teacher Magazine: The End of School as We Know It? - 0 views

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    very interesting -- anyone care to highlight and comment?
Illya Arnet

Lunch over IP: ESE (Evil Search Engine) movies: a scenario - 0 views

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    The second story was published in a Swiss magazine. I find it more interesting than the first as it opens up to all sorts of questions about what happens with all the data we put on the net. It makes one think, though I wouldn't stop just because of the negative possibilites. I have nothing to hide and the profit I (we) gain is greater in my opinion
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
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    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
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