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Holly Dilatush

How should we use the tagging system to b... | Diigo - 0 views

    • Joao Alves
       
      It's very to do if you use the Diigo toolbar. Just selelct the text you want to highlight and then click on the arrow beside the "Comment" button on the Diigo toolbar. There choose "Add a floating sticky note to this page." Then you'll get a pop-up window where you can choose to make your note private (only you can see it) or public or share it with a specific group. I am sharing this sticky note with the text group.
    • jennifer verschoor
       
      Thanks for sharing this!!! This is wonderful and we can continue discussing tags, categories or lists with the floating sticky notes. Jennifer
    • Carla Arena
       
      Isn't it nice, Jen, this feature? Can you envision pedagogical uses of it in the classroom?
    • Sasa Sirk
       
      These sticky notes are cool. :-) Thanks for sharing this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Yes, these floating sticky notes are really cool. Maybe we could encourage students to use them to make comments on texts they read on the Net. Who knows they would enjoy this way of reading and writing. Well, it's just a thought, maybe a too optimistic one.
    • Carla Arena
       
      We are all optimistic, aren't we, João? Maybe if we started not expecting that the students would write the sticky notes, but, at least, read ours, they could be encouraged to go further. For example, we could have them read a text and use the sticky notes for comprehension, reflection. What do you think?
    • Joao Alves
       
      Hi Carla, I like your idea of letting students read our sticky notes first. That would certainly be a good start. We wouldn't ask them to do anything in the beginning except looking at and reading our sticky notes. Maybe they (at least some of them) might also want to try using the sticky notes the same way. And we teachers mustn't show a too great enthusiasm for it, just behave the normal way or even show a kind of uninterested interest. :-) That's a lesson I learned. :-)
    • Carla Arena
       
      Exactly, Joao. That's the way I tend to do it, casually! I guess that if we just give the students a link with our annotation, like asking questions, then some of them would be. at least, curious to learn how we did that!
    • Joao Alves
       
      Exactly. Let's try that. It seems we are excellent educators. :-)
  • tag things with as many keywords as possible
  • tag things so they are easier for others to find
  • ...29 more annotations...
  • choose any or all of the recommended tags for your bookmarks.
  • you could simply use quotation marks for "lesson plan"
  • there are no better tags than others.
  • we should agree on a special tag for the group like "LWC" that we would always add to every bookmark we tagged.
  • Organizing tags in topics or bundles
  • CamelCase is my favorite for MultiWordTags
  • plural forms for countable nouns.
  • Take, for instance, collaborat, a tag I tend to favor in de.licio.us to capture the essence of collaborate, collaboration, collaborative, and collaborators
  • awareness-raising,
  • are means of raising awareness
  • wondering if there're any shortcut suggestions to 'attacking' the project of revisiting and tagging them?
  • I've been tagging many things both ESOL and ESL (because I don't know if diigo would automatically search for both. Is there a way to find out ?
  • we're moving from just collecting resources to a more engaged collective way of making the best out of the resources we share with the group.
  • the power of folksonomies is exactly having everybody tagging as much as possible, with as much key-words as you can think of. We won't ever be able to create a true "system"
  • agging for personal use x tagging for public good
  • Tagging will always be ambiguous because our very personal ways of classifying things and making them useful for us. Even so, with folksonomies, we're able to see the latest trends in a determined group or about a certain topic, we can go to places never imagined before.
  • http://k12learning20.wikispaces.com/.
  • e-learning
  • e-teaching, e-learning, networking, workshop, web
  • "prof. development"
  • difference between tags and categories
  • web2.0, wiki, professional_development, technology, edtech
  • e-learninge-learninge-teachingedtechnetworkingprof. developmentprofessional_developmenttechnologyweb2.0web2.0wikiworkshop
  • ProDev
  • web2.0, wikis, education, learning, teaching, ProDev, k-12
  • networking
  • I tend to use underscores and plurals, as well as one word tags, like professionaldevelopment, though I agree with Paul that ProfDev would make sense
  • I need to be more consistent.
  • The] "Lists" [function] provides another great way to organize bookmarks, a way that is complementary to tagging
    • Ilse Mönch
       
      Hi, yes I agree "Lists" are a great way to organize bookmarks. I already made a list for my "teaching resources" items as a try and now I'm going to experiment with the webslides. The only thing is that I imported my bookmarks from delicious and it's hard work to organize them all :-)
  •  
    So, how could we organize our tagging system after this week's discussion? Give some practical hints here. I'll start with: - try to keep a single word tag - add as many tags as you can think of - think of individual uses of the tags you're using, as well as the collective needs of easy retrieval of resources - tag, tag, tag - pay attention to mispelled words - use the groups' recommended tags in addition to the ones you've already used -
  •  
    Week 2 Discussion in the LearningwithComputers group about ways to improve our collective tagging experience.
Paul Beaufait

Learning technology teacher development blog: Text to Speech for EFL ESL Materials - 1 views

  •  
    Nik Peachey previews ReadTheWords.com (beta) online text-to-speech converter, prior to suggesting ways for EAL learners to use it for help "with their listening, reading and pronunciation" (¶2)
  •  
    Nik may (have) announce(d) this post on the mailing list. He's looking for teachers to try out ReadTheWords.
anamaria menezes

shortText.com - Twitzer Firefox extension - 0 views

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    Twitzer is a Firefox extension which lets you post text longer than 140 characters on Twitter.com
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
  •  
    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
Carla Arena

Utterz - Your Recent Utters - 1 views

  •  
    Seems a promising tool for mobile blogging.
Mary Hillis

TagCrowd - make your own tag cloud from any text - 0 views

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    Just put in a URL and this will generate a cloud based on word frequency
  •  
    I found this tool via Bamboo Project Blog this morning. It is really fun to put in the URL of your own blog and see what words you use most often.
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