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Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
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    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
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adVancEducation: Trial by Twitter - 0 views

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    Very informative article Vance wrote about Twitter.
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Mentoring and 21st Century Skills » Evolve - 0 views

  • key for lifelong learning and ongoing further development, not only to learn about ICT skills, but actually to learn with and from others in an continuum process of peer mentoring and support.
    • Joao Alves
       
      I can only agree with this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • Another key thought of this session was the idea that the skills 21st Century learners need doesn’t rely so much on acquiring information, but actually making sense of that information. Anne states that “knowing a fact is no longer impressive; rather important is how we add some critical thinking to it.” In this sense how we manage the abundance of information available these days on the we web is crucial. And that implies new skills, like networking and collaborative work.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Learning Technologies should not play a predominant role in the 21st Century learning and mentoring approach as not to overshadow the pedagogical strategy. Technologies should therefore be used to support new learning opportunities and enable different learning contexts. Still the emphasis has to be on the individual and on learning.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Agree. Many of us, including me, often tend to put the emphasis on technology instead on the the individual and on learning.
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Week 1 - Any Questions or Comments about Social Bookmarking? | Diigo - 0 views

    • Joao Alves
       
      The idea of bundling tags in weeks is a very good and simple one. Students feel there is a guidance and that they don't need to waste time searching for relevant information. It's like in webquest where you give certain sites to students to explore about a specific topic.
  • Besides, I created a tutorial with the most important features in Delicious.
  • Another aspect is that I think that online bookmarking should make us guilty-free instead of guilty because we don't check all the links we've bookmarked.
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • Who said we need to look at them all?
  • As for information overload, I consider bookmarking a way to dribble information overload. Why? If you have tons of bookmarks together with tons of people's bookmarks being tagged, you can use those bookmarks to create meaning whenever needed.
  • If you consider Diigo for that matter, you could easily set up a group and you could have the bookmarks for your students to start with and encourage them to share their bookmarks with the group. Also, I'd consider specific tags
  • I think the comments feature and the sticky notes have great potential in the classroom!
  • Working with bookmarks to make a digital portfolio sounds very creative.
  • I thought the idea of a digital portfolio using tags a very interesting one, even more with the webslides. You can keep track of all the online artifacts you've been creating. Interesting for busy educators!
  • I think a really big thing is to change one's way of thinking.
  • First, add tags that are meaningful for you, for your private retrieval, and also tags that have been suggested by the group that will help others browse through the treasures you find online.
  • Handling more information and sharing it with our colleagues should make us better teachers.
  • Every online resource we explore is bookmarked and shared with the group. I used to do that in delicious. Now, I'll have to see how to do that here. In delicious I could easily organize my tags in Weeks (bundling tags). Here, I think you can use the "lists" to organize your tags in a meaningful way to the group. I'll check that.
    • Joao Alves
       
      This would be interesting to explore further.
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    You are such a competent teacher using technologies, Carla. Congratulations!
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Folksonomies - Cooperative Classification and Communication Through Shared Metadata - 0 views

  • A user on Flickr, Andrew Lowosky, began posting pictures of doorbells in Florence, along with a brief piece of fiction about the doorbell in the description of the photograph. He dubbed this combination of photograph and short story “flicktion,” and tagged it as such. (Lowosky, 2004.) Some other users have been tagging photographs with “flicktion” and writing short fiction to accompany it
    • Carla Arena
       
      Interesting use of tags.
  • the most used tags are more likely to be used by other users since they are more likely to be seen
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's our idea, isn't it? Providing more tags that will be useful for individual use and for the group.
  • A folksonomy represents simultaneously some of the best and worst in the organization of information. Its uncontrolled nature is fundamentally chaotic, suffers from problems of imprecision and ambiguity that well developed controlled vocabularies and name authorities effectively ameliorate. Conversely, systems employing free-‍form tagging that are encouraging users to organize information in their own ways are supremely responsive to user needs and vocabularies, and involve the users of information actively in the organizational system. Overall, transforming the creation of explicit metadata for resources from an isolated, professional activity into a shared, communicative activity by users is an important development that should be explored and considered for future systems development.
    • Carla Arena
       
      imprecision and ambiguity x free-form tagging - user-generated communicative activity. We should see how our community semantic building evolves.
  •  
    reference from Folksonomies: Tidying up Tags?
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    Thanks, Paul, for bookmarking this site. Interesting reading that points out to what we've been experiencing, the strengths and weakenesses of folksonomies. If we learn about them, we can try to minimize a bit ambiguity problems in tagging, though they will always be there!
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Connectivism & Connective Knowledge » More is different… - 0 views

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    More is different. Online classrooms, large open courses, ease of access, and abundance of information all suggest that something is different when scale and complexity change. A course with 250 learners is not simply a course with 10 x's the learners of one with 25. It is something entirely different.
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Nine Notable Uses for Social Bookmarking - 0 views

    • IN PI
       
      "Therefore, if you can attach an URL to a document, then you could use social bookmarking to organize any kind of document. This change of thinking can provide almost limitless opportunities for information management."
    • IN PI
       
      Nine uses - A use Information for yourself 1. Create a calendar of upcoming events 2. use bookmarks as a people data base 3. Maintain an on-line folder of research materials and reference sites 4. Create a file indexing system - images, video, audio - for items that are on line: organize them and also graphics and written documents: any kind of file on the Web can be classified and stored. 5. Determine the popularity or a website or a link: if certain bookmarks are being saved by many users, it may be an indication that the material is worth while. B - Share Information with other people 6. Create a public on-line portfolio: you can use bookmarks to create a tagged index of your on-line creative work. These groupings of your content may be shared with others in social bookmarking sites. 7. use bookmarks to make new contacts: discover the profile IDs or those who created the bookmarks: you may contact a person that bookmarks a lot of sites that you are looking for too. 8. Become an expert in giving opinions about specific websites. 9. Bookmarks may organize documents by multiple criteria within a single application; but you may use several different bookmarking applications: 9.1. Delicious - large number of users - great sharing. 9.2. Magnoia - with social features making it easier to share ideas. 9.3. Netvouz - powerful search and tagging
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    first Web2.0 Wednesday Using social bookmarking to share and organize information; to manage an on-line portfolio
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Coding In Paradise: Creating a Personal Research Agenda - 0 views

  • If you do not work on an important problem, it's unlikely you'll do important work.
  • It's not the consequence that makes a problem important, it is that you have a reasonable attack
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    1.About having a research agenda: 1.1."It is a list of questions to focus on, the organizing principle around which you work" 1.2.Benefits from having a personal research agenda: Keeps the track of meaning like following a thread while your thought mules over those questions. 2. Sharing of personal research questions: They turn around the future web - The Editable Web: finding "a web browser that deeply embeds collaboration and editing." 3. The fabulous "Web-utopia": "people, collaboration and usability are first class citizens; ... seamless community as a major component of the browser...unifying editing and community (Tim Berner)...collaborative hypertext... 4."How can we create communication technologies that provide ever greater levels of interpersonal connection...? 5. "How can we create information technologies of focus and minimal distraction...?" ("The law of conservation of attention") 6. On search systems 7. On transforming how we link and talk about information and docs 8. Lightening the handling of events 9. On effectiveness at creating ideas 10. On creating technologies as important as writing
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Pageflakes - webheads's Webheads Blogs - 0 views

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    Thanks to Carla Arena for organizing this Pageflakes of all the Webheads blogs. Tip: If you already use Pageflakes click "Watch this page" or "Copy" at the top of the page to easily get all the information into your own Pageflakes account!
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ESL podcards - 0 views

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    There you can find information listenings about famous cities or famous people with their biographies as well as the transcripts, duration of the listening piece and worksheets to work with them
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BBC | British Council teaching English - Resources - Blogging for ELT - 0 views

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    Graham's BC article on blogging. Brief, informative, clelarly written.
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TESL-EJ On the Internet: Diaries as introspective research tools - 0 views

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    Diaries and blogging Rec on baw06
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