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Eric Patnoudes

Reform Education, Education the World - 0 views

  •  
    Ideas for progress toward reforming public education, innovative uses of technology in the classroom and making school an authentic and meaningful experience.
Maryanne Burgos

Introduction to Creative Thinking - 0 views

    • Maryanne Burgos
       
      This is the viewpoint of the authors of Disrupting Class who believe that "innovation does not take root through a direct attach on the existing system.  Instead it must go around and underneath the system.  This is how disruption drives affordability, accessibility, capability and responsiveness." (p. 225)
  • Reapplication.
  • general purpose spray cleaners can be used to kill ants.
  • ...22 more annotations...
  • Changing Direction
  • the goal is to solve the problem, not to implement a particular solution.
  • Motivation--a willingness to expend the effort--is more important than laboratory apparatus. And remember that you can always do something. Even if you cannot totally eradicate the problem from the face of the earth, you can always do something to make the situation better.
  • Mistakes aren't fun, but they sure are educational.
  • Positive Attitudes for Creativity
  • Curiosity. Creative people want to know things--all kinds of things-- just to know them. Knowledge does not require a reason. The question, "Why do you want to know that?" seems strange to the creative person, who is likely to respond, "Because I don't know the answer." Knowledge is enjoyable and often useful in strange and unexpected ways
  • halleng
  • Challenge. Curious people like to identify and challenge the assumptions behind ideas, proposals, problems, beliefs, and statements. Many assumptions, of course, turn out to be quite necessary and solid, but many others have been assumed unnecessarily, and in breaking out of those assumptions often comes a new idea, a new path, a new solution.
  • Constructive discontent. This is not a whining, griping kind of discontent, but the ability to see a need for improvement and to propose a method of making that improvement. Constructive discontent is a positive, enthusiastic discontent, reflecting the thought, "Hey, I know a way to make that better."
  • 4. A belief that most problems can be solved.
  • 5. The ability to suspend judgment and criticism.
  • Remember then that (1) an idea may begin to look good only after it becomes a bit more familiar or is seen in a slightly different context or clothing or circumstance
  • 6. Seeing the good in the bad. Creative thinkers, when faced with poor solutions, don't cast them away. Instead, they ask, "What's good about it?" because there may be something useful even in the worst ideas. And however little that good may be, it might be turned to good effect or made greater.
  • 7. Problems lead to improvements.
  • 8. A problem can also be a solution
  • 9. Problems are interesting and emotionally acceptable.
  • Miscellaneous Good Attitudes
  • 1. Perseverance.
  • 2. A flexible imagination
  • 3. A belief that mistakes are welcome. Modern society has for some reason conceived the idea that the only unforgivable thing is to fail or make a mistake. Actually failure is an opportunity; mistakes show that something is being done. So creative people have come to realize and accept emotionally that making mistakes is no negative biggie. One chief executive of a big American corporation warns all his newly hired managers, "Make sure you make a reasonable number of mistakes." Mistakes are educational and can lead to success--because they mean you are doing something.
  • Robert Harris Version Date: July 1, 1998
    • Maryanne Burgos
       
      Biographical info on Robert A. Harris http://www.virtualsalt.com/lit/bioblurb.htm
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