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Holly Dilatush

How should we use the tagging system to b... | Diigo - 0 views

    • Joao Alves
       
      It's very to do if you use the Diigo toolbar. Just selelct the text you want to highlight and then click on the arrow beside the "Comment" button on the Diigo toolbar. There choose "Add a floating sticky note to this page." Then you'll get a pop-up window where you can choose to make your note private (only you can see it) or public or share it with a specific group. I am sharing this sticky note with the Learningwithcomputers group.
    • jennifer verschoor
       
      Thanks for sharing this!!! This is wonderful and we can continue discussing tags, categories or lists with the floating sticky notes. Jennifer
    • Carla Arena
       
      Isn't it nice, Jen, this feature? Can you envision pedagogical uses of it in the classroom?
    • Sasa Sirk
       
      These sticky notes are cool. :-) Thanks for sharing this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Yes, these floating sticky notes are really cool. Maybe we could encourage students to use them to make comments on texts they read on the Net. Who knows they would enjoy this way of reading and writing. Well, it's just a thought, maybe a too optimistic one.
    • Carla Arena
       
      We are all optimistic, aren't we, João? Maybe if we started not expecting that the students would write the sticky notes, but, at least, read ours, they could be encouraged to go further. For example, we could have them read a text and use the sticky notes for comprehension, reflection. What do you think?
    • Joao Alves
       
      Hi Carla, I like your idea of letting students read our sticky notes first. That would certainly be a good start. We wouldn't ask them to do anything in the beginning except looking at and reading our sticky notes. Maybe they (at least some of them) might also want to try using the sticky notes the same way. And we teachers mustn't show a too great enthusiasm for it, just behave the normal way or even show a kind of uninterested interest. :-) That's a lesson I learned. :-)
    • Carla Arena
       
      Exactly, Joao. That's the way I tend to do it, casually! I guess that if we just give the students a link with our annotation, like asking questions, then some of them would be. at least, curious to learn how we did that!
    • Joao Alves
       
      Exactly. Let's try that. It seems we are excellent educators. :-)
  • tag things with as many keywords as possible
  • tag things so they are easier for others to find
  • ...29 more annotations...
  • choose any or all of the recommended tags for your bookmarks.
  • you could simply use quotation marks for "lesson plan"
  • there are no better tags than others.
  • we should agree on a special tag for the group like "LWC" that we would always add to every bookmark we tagged.
  • Organizing tags in topics or bundles
  • CamelCase is my favorite for MultiWordTags
  • plural forms for countable nouns.
  • Take, for instance, collaborat, a tag I tend to favor in de.licio.us to capture the essence of collaborate, collaboration, collaborative, and collaborators
  • awareness-raising,
  • are means of raising awareness
  • wondering if there're any shortcut suggestions to 'attacking' the project of revisiting and tagging them?
  • I've been tagging many things both ESOL and ESL (because I don't know if diigo would automatically search for both. Is there a way to find out ?
  • we're moving from just collecting resources to a more engaged collective way of making the best out of the resources we share with the group.
  • the power of folksonomies is exactly having everybody tagging as much as possible, with as much key-words as you can think of. We won't ever be able to create a true "system"
  • agging for personal use x tagging for public good
  • Tagging will always be ambiguous because our very personal ways of classifying things and making them useful for us. Even so, with folksonomies, we're able to see the latest trends in a determined group or about a certain topic, we can go to places never imagined before.
  • http://k12learning20.wikispaces.com/.
  • e-learning
  • e-teaching, e-learning, networking, workshop, web
  • "prof. development"
  • difference between tags and categories
  • web2.0, wiki, professional_development, technology, edtech
  • e-learninge-learninge-teachingedtechnetworkingprof. developmentprofessional_developmenttechnologyweb2.0web2.0wikiworkshop
  • ProDev
  • web2.0, wikis, education, learning, teaching, ProDev, k-12
  • networking
  • I tend to use underscores and plurals, as well as one word tags, like professionaldevelopment, though I agree with Paul that ProfDev would make sense
  • I need to be more consistent.
  • The] "Lists" [function] provides another great way to organize bookmarks, a way that is complementary to tagging
    • Ilse Mönch
       
      Hi, yes I agree "Lists" are a great way to organize bookmarks. I already made a list for my "teaching resources" items as a try and now I'm going to experiment with the webslides. The only thing is that I imported my bookmarks from delicious and it's hard work to organize them all :-)
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    So, how could we organize our tagging system after this week's discussion? Give some practical hints here. I'll start with: - try to keep a single word tag - add as many tags as you can think of - think of individual uses of the tags you're using, as well as the collective needs of easy retrieval of resources - tag, tag, tag - pay attention to mispelled words - use the groups' recommended tags in addition to the ones you've already used -
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    Week 2 Discussion in the LearningwithComputers group about ways to improve our collective tagging experience.
Paul Beaufait

Half an Hour: The Future of Online Learning: Ten Years On - 0 views

  • While we want to provide personalized attention, especially to submitted work, testing and grading, learning is still heavily dependent on the teacher. But because the teacher in turn is responsible for assembling, and often presenting, the materials to be learned, customization and personalization have not been practical. So we have adopted a model where small groups of people form a cohort, thus allowing the teacher to present the same material to more than one person at a time, while offering individualized interaction and assessment.
  • Though networks have always existed, modern communications technologies highlight their existence and given them a new robustness. networks are distinct from groups in that they preserve individual autonomy and promote diversity of belief, purpose and methodology. In a network, however, people do not act as disassociated individuals, but rather, cooperate in a series of exchanges that can produce, not merely individual goods, but also social goods.
  • In the case of informal learning, however, the structure is much looser. People pursue their own objectives in their own way, while at the same time initiating and sustaining an ongoing dialogue with others pursuing similar objectives. Learning and discussion is not structured, but rather, is determined by the needs and interests of the participants.
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • it is not clear that an outcomes driven system is what students require; many valuable skills and aptitudes – art appreciation, for example – are not identifiable as an outcome. This becomes evident when we consider how learning is to be measured. In traditional learning, success is achieved not merely by passing the test but in some way being recognized as having achieved expertise. A test-only system is a coarse system of measurement for a complex achievement.
  • The products of our conversations are as concrete as test scores and grades. (Ryan, 2007) But, as the result of a complex and interactive process, they are much more complex, allowing not only for the measurement of learning, but also for the recognition of learning. As it becomes easier to simply see what a student can accomplish, the idea of a coarse-grained proxy, such as grades, will fade to the background.
  • Most educators, and most educational institutions, have not yet embraced the idea of flow and syndication in learning. They will – reluctantly – because it provides the learner with the means to manage and control his or her learning. They can keep unwanted content to a minimum (and this includes unwanted content from an institution). And they can manage many more sources – or content streams – using feed reader technology.RSS and related specifications will be one of the primary ways Personal Learning Environments connect with remote systems. To use a PLE will be essentially to immerse oneself in the flow of communications that constitutes a community of practice in some discipline or domain on the internet.
  • In the end, what will be evaluated is a complex portfolio of a student’s online activities. (Syverson & Slatin, 2006)
  • place independence means that real learning will occur in real environments, with the contributions of the students not being some artifice designed strictly for practice, but an actual contribution to the business or enterprise in question.
  • As it becomes more and more possible to teach oneself online, and even to demonstrate one’s achievement through productive membership in a community of practice, there will be greater demand for a formalized system of recognition, a way for people to demonstrate their competence in an area without having to go through a formal program of study in the area.
  • the major shift in instructional technology will be from systems centered on the educational institution to systems centered on the individual learner.
  • rather than the employment of a single system to accomplish all educational tasks, both instructors and learners will use a variety of different tools in combination with each other.
  • Automation allows us to more easily create and present content, to more easily form groups and collaborate, to more easily give tests and take surveys. This frees instructors to perform tasks that have been traditionally more difficult and time consuming – to relate to students on a personal basis, to offer coaching and moral support, to learn about and analyze a student’s inclinations and understandings.
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    Thanks for all of your inspiration!
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    "an epic, must-read article" according to Brian Lamb (A social layer for DSpace? 2008.11.19 http://weblogs.elearning.ubc.ca/brian/archives/049355.php)
Learning with Computers group

iEARN - International Education and Resource Network - 0 views

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    A site that offers online collaborative projects within a large community of teachers and students around the world.
Paul Beaufait

LearningTimes Network - "LearningTimes.org" - 0 views

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    Podcast interview of Kevin Johnson exploring "tools and methods for collaborating online" (Show Notes, ¶1).
gabriela rosso

Vendée Globe 2008 - Hors les Murs - Beyond The Walls - 0 views

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    We hope that others in our global networks will join this page to keep in contact and to continue to expand our global community. If you know of other teachers who might enjoy following the Vendee Globe, perhaps you can share this page with them. Thanks very much,
Jose Antonio da Silva

Wiggio - Makes it easy to work in groups. - 17 views

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    Social networking website
Joao Alves

Mentoring and 21st Century Skills » Evolve - 0 views

  • key for lifelong learning and ongoing further development, not only to learn about ICT skills, but actually to learn with and from others in an continuum process of peer mentoring and support.
    • Joao Alves
       
      I can only agree with this.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • Another key thought of this session was the idea that the skills 21st Century learners need doesn’t rely so much on acquiring information, but actually making sense of that information. Anne states that “knowing a fact is no longer impressive; rather important is how we add some critical thinking to it.” In this sense how we manage the abundance of information available these days on the we web is crucial. And that implies new skills, like networking and collaborative work.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Absolutely!
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Learning Technologies should not play a predominant role in the 21st Century learning and mentoring approach as not to overshadow the pedagogical strategy. Technologies should therefore be used to support new learning opportunities and enable different learning contexts. Still the emphasis has to be on the individual and on learning.
    • Joao Alves
       
      Agree. Many of us, including me, often tend to put the emphasis on technology instead on the the individual and on learning.
andrew bendelow

Connections, Conversations and Collaborations: Creating a Personal Learning Collaboration That Works For You (Presentation Resources) - 0 views

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    resource base for connecting teachers in learning teams
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