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Paul Beaufait

7 Things You Should Know About Ning | EDUCAUSE CONNECT - 0 views

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    One of the latest publications in the ELI "Seven Things You Should Know About..." series
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    Abstract: Ning is an online service that allows users to create their own social networks and join and participate in other networks. No technical skill is required to set up a social network, and there are no limits to the number of networks a user can join. Users of Ning social networks have access to functionality similar to that of more well-known social networks, such as Facebook and MySpace. Various features allow users to read news or learn about related events, join groups, read and comment on blog entries, view photos and videos, and other activities as set up by the network creator. RSS feeds let users subscribe to updates from specific parts of the social network.
Benjamin Jörissen

rre : Message: [RRE]The Social Life of Information - 0 views

  • The importance of people as creators and carriers of knowledge is forcing organizations to realize that knowledge lies less in its databases than in its people.
  • Learning to be requires more than just information. It requires the ability to engage in the practice in question. Indeed, Bruner's distinction highlights another, made by the philosopher Gilbert Ryle. He distinguishes "know that" from "know how".
  • This claim of Polanyi's resembles Ryle's argument that "know that" doesn't produce "know how," and Bruner's that learning about doesn't, on its own, allow you to learn to be. Information, all these arguments suggest, is on its own not enough to produce actionable knowledge. Practice too is required.
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  • Despite the tendency to shut ourselves away and sit in Rodinesque isolation when we have to learn, learning is a remarkably social process. Social groups provide the resources for their members to learn.
  • Learning and Identity Shape One Another
  • Bruner, with his idea of learning to be, and Lave and Wenger, in their discussion of communities of practice, both stress how learning needs to be understood in relation to the development of human identity.
  • In learning to be, in becoming a member of a community of practice, an individual is developing a social identity.
  • So, even when people are learning about, in Bruner's terms, the identity they are developing determines what they pay attention to and what they learn. What people learn about, then, is always refracted through who they are and what they are learning to be.
  • In either case, the result, as the anthropologist Gregory Bateson puts it neatly, is "a difference that makes a difference". 29 The importance of disturbance or change makes it almost inevitable that we focus on these.
  • So to understand the whole interaction, it is as important to ask how the lake is formed as to ask how the pebble got there. It's this formation rather than information that we want to draw attention to, though the development is almost imperceptible and the forces invisible in comparison to the drama and immediacy of the pebble. It's not, to repeat once more, the information that creates that background. The background has to be in place for the information to register.
  • The forces that shape the background are, rather, the tectonic social forces, always at work, within which and against which individuals configure their identity. These create not only grounds for reception, but grounds for interpretation, judgment, and understanding.
    • Benjamin Jörissen
       
      kulturelle Muster, die qua Sozialisation erworben werden, und die in Bildungsprozessen verändert werden.
  • A Brief Note on the "Social"
  • It took Karl Marx to point out, however, that Crusoe is not a universal. On his island (and in Defoe's mind), he is deeply rooted in the society from which he came
  • Jean-Paul Sartre
  • We need not watch long before we can explain it: he is playing at being a waiter in a cafe . . . . [T]he waiter plays with his condition in order to realize it
  • So while people do indeed learn alone, even when they are not stranded on desert islands or in small cafes, they are nonetheless always enmeshed in society, which saturates our environment, however much we might wish to escape it at times.
  • For the same reason, however, members of these networks are to some degree divided or separated from people with different practices. It is not the different information they have that divides them.
  • Rather, it is their different attitudes or dispositions toward that information -- attitudes and dispositions shaped by practice and identity -- that divide. Consequently, despite much in common, physicians are different from nurses, accountants from financial planners.
  • two types of work-related networks
  • First, there are the networks that link people to others whom they may never get to know but who work on similar practices. We call these "networks of practice"
  • Second, there are the more tight-knit groups formed, again through practice, by people working together on the same or similar tasks. These are what, following Lave and Wenger, we call "communities of practice".
  • Networks of Practice
  • The 25,000 reps working for Xerox make up, in theory, such a network.
Paul Beaufait

Alternatives To Ning: Guide To The Best Social Networking Platforms And Online Group Services - 11 views

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    "If you are considering the option of switching to a different social networking platform to replace your soon-to-be discontinued free Ning community, in this MasterNewMedia guide you will find all the data you need to identify your best Ning alternative out there." (retrieved 2010.07.27)
Paul Beaufait

Ning: About: Ning Apps - 3 views

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    Network Creators can enter their social network's URL below to start installing apps
mbarek Akaddar

Free Social Networking Sites - 10 views

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    Free Social Networking Sites
IN PI

Research on Social Network Sites - 0 views

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    Research on social networking sites
Paul Beaufait

Social Media Workshop « Language Acquisition Resource Center - 8 views

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    Blended participation, 2010.08.09-13 (PDT): "What's happening with blogs, wikis, podcasts and social networking?  How can we use the tools our students use to connect, share, and inform in the language classroom?"
Paul Beaufait

Half an Hour: The Future of Online Learning: Ten Years On - 0 views

  • While we want to provide personalized attention, especially to submitted work, testing and grading, learning is still heavily dependent on the teacher. But because the teacher in turn is responsible for assembling, and often presenting, the materials to be learned, customization and personalization have not been practical. So we have adopted a model where small groups of people form a cohort, thus allowing the teacher to present the same material to more than one person at a time, while offering individualized interaction and assessment.
  • Though networks have always existed, modern communications technologies highlight their existence and given them a new robustness. Networks are distinct from groups in that they preserve individual autonomy and promote diversity of belief, purpose and methodology. In a network, however, people do not act as disassociated individuals, but rather, cooperate in a series of exchanges that can produce, not merely individual goods, but also social goods.
  • In the case of informal learning, however, the structure is much looser. People pursue their own objectives in their own way, while at the same time initiating and sustaining an ongoing dialogue with others pursuing similar objectives. Learning and discussion is not structured, but rather, is determined by the needs and interests of the participants.
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  • it is not clear that an outcomes driven system is what students require; many valuable skills and aptitudes – art appreciation, for example – are not identifiable as an outcome. This becomes evident when we consider how learning is to be measured. In traditional learning, success is achieved not merely by passing the test but in some way being recognized as having achieved expertise. A test-only system is a coarse system of measurement for a complex achievement.
  • The products of our conversations are as concrete as test scores and grades. (Ryan, 2007) But, as the result of a complex and interactive process, they are much more complex, allowing not only for the measurement of learning, but also for the recognition of learning. As it becomes easier to simply see what a student can accomplish, the idea of a coarse-grained proxy, such as grades, will fade to the background.
  • Most educators, and most educational institutions, have not yet embraced the idea of flow and syndication in learning. They will – reluctantly – because it provides the learner with the means to manage and control his or her learning. They can keep unwanted content to a minimum (and this includes unwanted content from an institution). And they can manage many more sources – or content streams – using feed reader technology.RSS and related specifications will be one of the primary ways Personal Learning Environments connect with remote systems. To use a PLE will be essentially to immerse oneself in the flow of communications that constitutes a community of practice in some discipline or domain on the internet.
  • In the end, what will be evaluated is a complex portfolio of a student’s online activities. (Syverson & Slatin, 2006)
  • place independence means that real learning will occur in real environments, with the contributions of the students not being some artifice designed strictly for practice, but an actual contribution to the business or enterprise in question.
  • As it becomes more and more possible to teach oneself online, and even to demonstrate one’s achievement through productive membership in a community of practice, there will be greater demand for a formalized system of recognition, a way for people to demonstrate their competence in an area without having to go through a formal program of study in the area.
  • the major shift in instructional technology will be from systems centered on the educational institution to systems centered on the individual learner.
  • rather than the employment of a single system to accomplish all educational tasks, both instructors and learners will use a variety of different tools in combination with each other.
  • Automation allows us to more easily create and present content, to more easily form groups and collaborate, to more easily give tests and take surveys. This frees instructors to perform tasks that have been traditionally more difficult and time consuming – to relate to students on a personal basis, to offer coaching and moral support, to learn about and analyze a student’s inclinations and understandings.
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    Thanks for all of your inspiration!
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    "an epic, must-read article" according to Brian Lamb (A social layer for DSpace? 2008.11.19 http://weblogs.elearning.ubc.ca/brian/archives/049355.php)
Gladys Baya

What Kind of People are Following You on Twitter - 0 views

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    Use TwitterSheep to learn who's reading your tweets. Review by Amit Agwaral. My impressions here: http://gladysbaya.edublogs.org/2009/02/10/social-networking-sorting-the-wheat/
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    @Ana Maria Menezes: the seed you planted keeps growing! ;-)
Learning Today

Welcome to a New World! Virtual Worlds for Kids! - 0 views

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    learning, technology, kids, virtual worlds, interacting, social networks
Paul Beaufait

The Ning Thing - 5 views

  • it would be folly for educators having suffered inconvenience at best, data loss at worst, to commit their content yet again to a potentially unreliable cloud provider. Alec Couros sees this kind of thing happening more and more in the crystal ball future and suggests that schools and educators would be better off investing in self-hosting using FOSS, free and open source software (Couros, 2010).
  • As suggested above, the only reliable alternative to Ning is to host your community yourself, or at a trusted institution, where you do your own regular backups, and your content is safe behind a firewall, with a UPS power source in case of power outages, and perhaps some sort of RAID system to keep you running through system crashes.
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    Vance Stevens recaps recent Ning corporate decisions influencing virtual educational community developers, and outlines alternatives
Paul Beaufait

Lang-8 - Multi-lingual language learning and language exchange | Lang-8 - 10 views

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    A social networking system for learners of various languages seeking correction of their writing by native speakers of those languages, in exchange, return, or pay-forward for correction they provide for peer learners of their own languages.
andrew bendelow

Education Week's Digital Directions: Social Networking Goes to School - 0 views

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    hybrid schooling via socialization applications
mbarek Akaddar

Make a Group Website - Webs.com - 8 views

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    Looking to create a free social network? Webs is a free Ning alternative.
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