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Walter Antoniotti

I Flipped statistics using computers - 7 views

http://www.textbooksfree.org/Interesting_Thoughts_Concerning_Education_Page1.htm#Battlefield_Reflections_of_a__Life-Long_Statistic_Teacher_

learningwithcomputers education tools resources learning technology teaching

started by Walter Antoniotti on 08 Sep 16 no follow-up yet
Walter Antoniotti

Response to Class Project Over 100 BUT - 5 views

No one e-mail with questions. I added a contest, made instruction clearer. Plus I added Turning Points in American History to the projects page. http://www.textbooksfree.org/Turning%20Points%20in%...

learningwithcomputers education tools resources learning online teaching technology web2.0 writing

started by Walter Antoniotti on 15 Aug 16 no follow-up yet
Walter Antoniotti

Class Project - 4 views

See http://www.textbooksfree.org/U.S.%20Terror%20Episodes%20Since%201900.htm

learningwithcomputers education online technology writing

started by Walter Antoniotti on 12 Aug 16 no follow-up yet
andrew bendelow

Brain Development in a Hyper-Tech World - Dana Foundation - 4 views

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    The information explosion brought about by the Internet and other modern technological tools has undeniably had positive influences on society. "These are enabling technologies," said Friedlander. "I think their greatest power lies in their ability to enable people to reach out to a world that is much greater than what any child is likely to get in their home or school environment. That's all good and positive."

    The trick, he said, is knowing where to draw the line. "It gets down to a quantitative question: how much is too much? That's where the rubber really meets the road for most people, and that is a really tough question to answer."

    The responsibility for making such decisions often falls on parents, but they may not be equipped, able, or willing to do so. "We always hear the same thing, that it's up to parents to control the use of these things and teach kids how to manage it all," said Grafman. "But in order for them to do this, they have to understand better themselves what they are creating with their children. Many parents today just say, 'here's your computer, put it in your room and do your homework on it,' and that's the last they see of the kid. If that's the case, how much are kids going to listen?"
Nessy yitway Biz

Flash Game Downloader v1.0 - 0 views

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    You may have tried some of the ways, but with many methods or tools it still remains difficult to accomplish this task. That's why I want to show you this amazing solution. Flash Game Downloader allows you to easily download and play unlimited free flash games from all over the web.
Paul Beaufait

Miguel Guhlin: Nurture Human Talents - 5 views

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    Weighs drill-n-kill against creative engagement and problem solving with computers. Thanks to Claudia for point this out.
Javier Mejia Torrenegra

USO EDUCATIVO DE LOS WIKIS - 6 views

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    A partir del 2004, la penetración de servicios Web 2.0 a través de Internet, posibilitó una segunda generación de comunidades basadas en la Web y de servicios residentes en ella; tales como sitios que permiten generar redes sociales que facilitan la creatividad, la colaboración y que ofrezcan a los usuarios la posibilidad de compartir entre ellos contenidos y otros recursos, sin importar su diversidad o ubicación geográfica. Uno de los servicios más exitosos de la Web 2.0 son los denominados Wikis. Basta con mencionar a Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre y de construcción colectiva, como el ícono de lo que representa las posibilidades de esta tecnología informática en Internet.
Colishia Benjamin

learningwithcomputers07 / online_bookmarking - 5 views

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    Dear all, Great to have you on board to one more journey into cyberspace. We'll start exploring the miscellaneous world of online bookmarking and the power it holds to connect to others, organize ourselves and share.
Carla Arena

Is Google Making Us Stupid? - 0 views

  • hyperlinks don’t merely point to related works; they propel you toward them.)
  • They supply the stuff of thought, but they also shape the process of thought. And what the Net seems to be doing is chipping away my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Net distributes it: in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a guy on a Jet Ski.
  • “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • We are not only what we read
  • We are how we read
  • Wolf worries that the style of reading promoted by the Net, a style that puts “efficiency” and “immediacy” above all else, may be weakening our capacity for the kind of deep reading that emerged when an earlier technology, the printing press, made long and complex works of prose commonplace
  • Our ability to interpret text, to make the rich mental connections that form when we read deeply and without distraction, remains largely disengaged.
    • Carla Arena
       
      So, how can we still use "power browsing" and teach our students to interpret, analyze, think.
  • The human brain is almost infinitely malleable. People used to think that our mental meshwork, the dense connections formed among the 100 billion or so neurons inside our skulls, was largely fixed by the time we reached adulthood. But brain researchers have discovered that that’s not the case
    • Carla Arena
       
      That's what a student of mine, who is a neurologist, calls neuroplasticity.
  • Still, their easy assumption that we’d all “be better off” if our brains were supplemented, or even replaced, by an artificial intelligence is unsettling. It suggests a belief that intelligence is the output of a mechanical process, a series of discrete steps that can be isolated, measured, and optimized. In Google’s world, the world we enter when we go online, there’s little place for the fuzziness of contemplation. Ambiguity is not an opening for insight but a bug to be fixed. The human brain is just an outdated computer that needs a faster processor and a bigger hard drive.
    • Carla Arena
       
      Scary...
  • It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.
    • Carla Arena
       
      more hyperlinking, more possibilites for ads, more commercial value to others...
  • The kind of deep reading that a sequence of printed pages promotes is valuable not just for the knowledge we acquire from the author’s words but for the intellectual vibrations those words set off within our own minds. In the quiet spaces opened up by the sustained, undistracted reading of a book, or by any other act of contemplation, for that matter, we make our own associations, draw our own inferences and analogies, foster our own ideas. Deep reading, as Maryanne Wolf argues, is indistinguishable from deep thinking.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
    • Carla Arena
       
      we really need those quiet spaces, the white spaces on a page to breathe and see what's really out there.
  • If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content,” we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
  • I come from a tradition of Western culture, in which the ideal (my ideal) was the complex, dense and “cathedral-like” structure of the highly educated and articulate personality—a man or woman who carried inside themselves a personally constructed and unique version of the entire heritage of the West. [But now] I see within us all (myself included) the replacement of complex inner density with a new kind of self—evolving under the pressure of information overload and the technology of the “instantly available.”
  • As we are drained of our “inner repertory of dense cultural inheritance,” Foreman concluded, we risk turning into “‘pancake people’—spread wide and thin as we connect with that vast network of information accessed by the mere touch of a button.”
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    I bought the Atlantic just because of this article and just loved it. It has an interesting analysis of what is happening to our reading, questions what might be happening to our brains, and it inquires on the future of our relationship with technology. Are we just going to become "pancake people"? Would love to hear what you think.
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