Skip to main content

Home/ Learning Sciences/ Group items matching "theories Cognitive" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Erdem Uygun

Constructivism, Social Constructivism and Situated Cognition: A Sliding Scale | nishancperera - 2 views

  •  
    When I read about situated cognition, I saw that cognitive constructivism, social constructivism and situated cognition are the same in manner that all reject objectivist point of view to teaching. However, since they are three different cognitive, I wonder what makes them different from each other.  I encountered this article in which differences are well emphasized. According to the article: cognitive constructivism says that people learn by building on their previous experiences with the environment. Since individuals have different history of experiences, same type of didactic teaching is not effective. cognitive constructivism focuses on mainly individual. Social constructivism purports that knowledge are co-constructed by members of groups from different cultural backgrounds and learning environments should foster collaborative learning. Social constructivism mainly focuses on groups rather than individuals. Situated cognition, on the other hand, suggests that regardless of the fact that concepts are handled as individuals or as groups, if those concepts are not taught within their actual-natural context, learning of those concepts are meaningless and inert. Situated cognition mainly focuses on the context.
Mine Önal

Learning Theories - 1 views

  •  
    There are many theories in this page that we should be interested in in this page as learning sciences students. An example of two groundbreaking research results in learning sciences is (1) Entwistle's Phenomenography theory This conceptual framework focuses on the experience of learning from the student's perspective and is based upon a phenomenological approach to research. Entwistle explains: "Our task is thus to describe more clearly how learning takes place in higher education and to point out how teaching and assessment affect the quality of learning. From these descriptions teachers should be able to draw their own lessons about how to facilitate their students' learning" (Marton, Hounsell & Entwistle, 1984, p.1). (2) Festinger's theories Dissonance Theory According to theories dissonance theory, there is a tendency for individuals to seek consistency among their cognitions (i.e., beliefs, opinions). When there is an inconsistency between attitudes or behaviors (dissonance), something must change to eliminate the dissonance. In the case of a discrepancy between attitudes and behavior, it is most likely that the attitude will change to accommodate the behavior.
Mine Önal

Instructional Design Models And Theories: The Situated Cognition Theory And The Theories Apprenticeship Model - eLearning Industry - 1 views

  •  
    Situated cognition theory
  •  
    I like this website; it gives the connection between situated learning and current educational necessities like modeling, scaffolding. In the class, these are expected from us and it really helps students visualize the target point. Thank you for sharing it with us.
Evrim Baran

Donald Clark Plan B: 9 reasons why I am NOT a Social Constructivist - 1 views

  •  
    I am curious about what you think on this. Do you agree?
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    Hocam, I think this guy has an introvert personality. If he doesn't, perhaps he took a course from a teacher who made him feel fed up with pair and group work activities :-)) I have read the comments of other people under the article and I liked the one made by Doug. As Doug stated, Donald Clark compares different perspectives in a linear manner, but these thinkers represent different developmental periods of the theory. So he should have made comparisons considering the development of the theory to be more plausible. For his overall comments at the end of his article, I can say that what he mentions ("Those with good digital literacy, literacy, numeracy and other skills will have the social support, especially at home") is not something peculiar to the results of this theory. We used to have more segragations in the societies when former theories were dominant. So his comment doesn't seem logical to me. He also mentions that some learners like studying alone, which is not supported by this theory. Of course sometimes we need some isolation to think, analyze and synthesize, but this doesn't make us forget about the advantages of peer learning. There is a saying, "two heads are better than one". As we discussed in the classroom, we learn better when we are theoriesly engaged and in my opinion, "engagement" requires contradictory or contributory comments made by other members of the society. It doesn't take place without interactions. To sum up, the theory may have some limitations, but I prefer it to the older ones :-)
  •  
    While reading I felt that the author is somewhat close to new ideas coming from other people, other thinkers, actually coming from the rest of the world. I mean as I understood at some parts, he is not open to accept the judgements or theories of some thinkers because what they said were already out there, they did not bring anything new. However I would name these people as men of action and thinkers ahead of their time. Because they draw attention to critical points that were ignored or missed by others. Maybe yes what they put forth were already out there or maybe some of their methods are not sufficient compared to our current methodologies but still they were the ones to see the complete picture and summarize things.
  •  
    Thank you Evrim Hocam:) I strongly believe in community, wikinomy, we have to share, we can learn from each other in an informal environment but social constructivism is not working on me:) As he wrote "At University I learned almost everything in the quiet of my own room and the library. In corporate life, I relished the opportunity to learn on trains and planes, havens of forced isolation, peace and quiet. To this day I blog a lot and enjoy periods of intense research, reading and writing. It's not that I've learned everything in these contexts, only that they go against the idea that all learning needs to be social." I always got successful with deliberate practice and with "Learning by Doing". I don't like social media as well, there are many damages than benefits and I'm not so introvert, maybe a little:) but it's not about being introvert or extrovert, it's about talking or doing... I want to tell a real story of my friend who was a novice programmer in a company. There were many experts, novices and they were taking courses, online, offline, with collaboration every time. Everybody were sharing, commenting, discussing but he began a real life project first week by himself and after 6 month they were still asking to each other but he finished his project. After one year he was the best programmer in the company. And everyone began to ask to him. I asked him, he told that he believes in working until suffering and just doing:) And he added this interesting sentence "You will learn and you will be successful when you will be so related, so suffering that one day you will see dreams and solve problems about the topics in your sleep" My friend's opinions are maybe a little bit dramatic but I believe in "doing" too, at least it's working for us:)
Murat Kol

How can the Situated Learning Theory be situated online? - 2 views

  •  
    When situated learning theory (SLT) is investigated, it can be seen that most of the articles or documents mention learning by doing within an actual context. The first thing that comes to mind is the real world environment while someone mentions the SLT. What if we want to form a "legitimate peripheral participation" environment to learn a concept by the boundaries of online platforms? How can we design online platforms by using situated learning theory?
  •  
    "Participation Learning becomes a social process dependent upon transactions with others. Learning is not separated from the world of action but exists in robust, complex, social environments made up of actors, actions, and situations. How to incorporate participation in online learning? *Create discussion boards to enable students to reflect socially *Encourage engagement in discussions and issues presented *Require students to present/defend their arguments in forums, discussion groups, bulletin boards *Encourage students to engage in critical reflection with other *Instructors should continually assess the growth of the student, and let the student know " These are the principles applied in our 542 course. We are experiencing situated cognition in progress.
Rukiye Ayan

Two Important Researchers in the Field of Learning Science - 6 views

David Paul Ausubel (1918-2008) was an American psychologist and cognitive learning cognitivet who had a significant contribution to the areas of educational psychology, cognitive science, and scienc...

started by Rukiye Ayan on 13 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
Mustafa İlkhan

What is cognitive load? - 0 views

  •  
    I know it's related to our previous topic, but still I like the way she explains; a clear model of the thousands of little things that have to happen as we move from novice to expert and wanted to share with you.
  •  
    We will talk more about cognitive load theory and its implications in education research later this semester. Thanks for sharing.
Hatice Çilsalar

Cognitive load theory - 0 views

  •  
    Tihs video presents a brief explanation of Cognitive load theory that we mentioned in last week. I hope you like it.
  •  
    I liked the definition of expertise as "acquisition of schemas" or mental structure. We talked about these in our discussion through organization of knowledge and chunking.
Burcu Korkusuz

Applying the Neurosciences to Educational Research: Can Cognitive Neuroscience Bridge th e Gap? - 0 views

  •  
    Recent findings in Cognitive Neuroscience are likely to have important implications for educational theory and practice.It is critical to determine whether these research findings sufficient,in and of themselves, to have a veridical impact on curriculum and policy.The ways in which neuroscience research will impact the field of education is discussed and Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences is examined as a case study of the impact of neuroscience on educational practice. It is concluded that experts who are well versed in both neuroscience and educational research and theory are needed and that the development of an indepe ndent discipline, Educational Neuroscience, will best bridge the gap between the two fields.
leventmetu

ANN LESLIE BROWN - 3 views

Ann Leslie Brown (1943-1999) was an educational psychologist who developed methods for teaching children to be better learners. Her interest in the human memory brought Brown to focus on active mem...

http:__edr.sagepub.com_content_28_7_33.full.pdf+html

started by leventmetu on 22 Oct 13 no follow-up yet
Burcu Korkusuz

Contemporary Learning Theories - 3 views

  •  
    Contemporary Theories of Learning - Learning Theorists...in Their Own Words - Knud Illeris >>> http://tr.scribd.com/doc/152409290/Contemporary-Theories-of-Learning-Learning-Theorists-in-Their-Own-Words-Knud-Illeris#download
  •  
    Thank you for the source, I found it last week too and I believe it is a very comprehensive source that can guide us in this course.
  •  
    Thanks for sharing the link. I found it in the METU library too. I can bring it to our class on Thursday. We can benefit from it for the discussion sessions or refer to it in our personal learning theories.
canannn

Cognitive Absorption - 0 views

  •  
    This is a study conducted in Turkey for adapting a scale on Cognitive Absorption. As I understand it is a concept that takes into account absorption, Cognitive engagement and flow as a framework. I wonder what other concepts might there be, that takes flow theory as a base, can be good to highlight.
Evrim Baran

Situated cognition - 16 views

Great example. Could you play this in class today?

Defne Kara

Knud Illeris - 0 views

  •  
    Knud Illeris, one of the contemporary learning theorists of our time with reference to his theory about social leaning that is three-dimension learning theory which are cognitive dimension, emotional dimension and social dimension.Attached you`ll find the article on the theory of three dimension.
Burcu Korkusuz

Professor Slava Kalyuga - 0 views

  •  
    Dr Kalyuga is a Professor at the School of Education, the University of New South Wales, where he has worked since 1995. His research interests are in cognitive processes in learning, cognitive load theory, and evidence-based instructional design principles. His specific contributions include detailed experimental studies of the role of learner prior knowledge in learning (expertise reversal effect); the redundancy effect in multimedia learning; the development of rapid online diagnostic assessment methods; and studies of the effectiveness of different adaptive procedures for tailoring instruction to levels of learner expertise
leventmetu

SITUATED COGNITION LESSON - 3 views

shared by leventmetu on 05 Nov 13 - No Cached
Ceren Ocak liked it
  •  
    It was an informing video about the basics of situated cognition, I wish that whole essays can be transformed into videos :) It was nice to support with perssonal experiencec with theory
haticekiz

Situated Learning Theory- Jean Lave - 0 views

  •  
    This video is similar to Sibel's but there are some different examples. Here are some interesting points; Jean Lave argues that situated learning does not need to be authentic always because there is algebra. Also she says that the situation must have cognitive complexity. She points that social networks can be used to enable learning environment.
Özlem Duran Ataalp

2 important people in the field of learning sciences - 5 views

Hi everyone!!! I'd like to share information about Jean Piaget and Janet L. Kolodner, whom I find quite important in the field of learning sciences. Everyone who studied teaching should be quite fa...

piaget cognitive kolodner case-basedreasoning

started by Özlem Duran Ataalp on 12 Oct 14 no follow-up yet
yasinay

Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math - 3 views

  •  
    I have seen this post when I was searching for how can interaction with peers contribute to learning maths. It is written by ROBERT SUN who is the CEO of Suntex International and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for deep practice in mathematics. The things that are mentioned felt very similar with our country's situation actually, as learners how do we use concepts of maths (or any other courses) except from school? May be the first reason for our students cannot learn and hate maths is behind this question.
  •  
    "Teachers can encourage their students to express themselves verbally using mathematical terms; even in the early grades, children can be asked to explain what they want or mean using numbers, or relationships between numbers. Anything that encourages them to talk about math and mathematical concepts is beneficial." Social math!. It looks like article emphasizes the importance of language in information exchange. It reminds me Vygotsky's socio-cultural theory in which he also believed that language is important for learning. He also purported that language is culture-dependent so each cultures' learning may be different from each other. In addition, providing opportunity to students to express themselves verbally can give us clues about current mental maps of students as to a specific topic (what is correct, what needs improvement, etc.). In addition, students can transfer their transformed ideas (ideas transformed from scholarly language to level-appropriate language) to their friends which can facilitate their learning.
  •  
    Yasin, I am curious to hear about some of the contemporary approaches towards teaching Math, a subject generally taught with more traditional methods. Regarding mathphobia, we also need to think about the culture that stimulates that.
Hatice Çilsalar

CAT-Computer assisted testing - 0 views

  •  
    This testing is depend on ıtem response theory(IRT) that is about to measure students ability to ask questions by considering the previous answers. It is highly related to cognitive tutoring. At they point tutoring goes on during the testing process.
1 - 20 of 29 Next ›
Showing 20 items per page