Skip to main content

Home/ Learning Sciences/ Group items matching "Cognitive" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Ezgi Hazal KÖK

The Report on Cognitive Tutor - 0 views

  •  
    Here is the website which has the full report on Carnegie Learning Curricula and Cognitive Tutor.
Burcu Korkusuz

Meta-Cognitive Tutoring - 0 views

  •  
    The article from International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education focuses on the hypothesis that an intelligent tutoring system that provides guidance with respect to students'meta-cognitive abilities can help them to become better learners.
  •  
    I think the research design they follow is detailed, there is development of a model and then validation of it over time. I have checked one of the authors' recent publications and realized that he has researches on self-regulation during learning ,example-tracing tutors, interesting concepts to examine.
Hatice Çilsalar

Carnegie Cognitive Tutor Screencast - 0 views

  •  
    An application of the cognitive tutoring system.
  •  
    I checked this software and it is really interactive and feedbacks are meaningfull. I also like the idea of Skillometer where students can follow their process and realize where they stand in spesific content.
leventmetu

Ken Robinson diyor ki; "Okullar yaratıcılığı öldürüyor." - 10 views

The problem comes with the understanding of formal education which feels it should not leave any spare time for any activity students wish to do..

leventmetu

Difficulties in Comprehending Causal Relations Among Children With ADHD: The Role of Cognitive Engagement - 0 views

  •  
    Questions To Be Raised: What do you think of Motivation and Cognitive Engagement for Students with ADHD? Could Montesorri design be sustainable with ADHD Students?
Burcu Korkusuz

Applying the Neurosciences to Educational Research: Can Cognitive Neuroscience Bridge th e Gap? - 0 views

  •  
    Recent findings in Cognitive Neuroscience are likely to have important implications for educational theory and practice.It is critical to determine whether these research findings sufficient,in and of themselves, to have a veridical impact on curriculum and policy.The ways in which neuroscience research will impact the field of education is discussed and Gardner's theory of Multiple Intelligences is examined as a case study of the impact of neuroscience on educational practice. It is concluded that experts who are well versed in both neuroscience and educational research and theory are needed and that the development of an indepe ndent discipline, Educational Neuroscience, will best bridge the gap between the two fields.
Burcu Korkusuz

Professor Slava Kalyuga - 0 views

  •  
    Dr Kalyuga is a Professor at the School of Education, the University of New South Wales, where he has worked since 1995. His research interests are in cognitive processes in learning, cognitive load theory, and evidence-based instructional design principles. His specific contributions include detailed experimental studies of the role of learner prior knowledge in learning (expertise reversal effect); the redundancy effect in multimedia learning; the development of rapid online diagnostic assessment methods; and studies of the effectiveness of different adaptive procedures for tailoring instruction to levels of learner expertise
leventmetu

ANN LESLIE BROWN - 3 views

Ann Leslie Brown (1943-1999) was an educational psychologist who developed methods for teaching children to be better learners. Her interest in the human memory brought Brown to focus on active mem...

http:__edr.sagepub.com_content_28_7_33.full.pdf+html

started by leventmetu on 22 Oct 13 no follow-up yet
leventmetu

SITUATED COGNITION LESSON - 3 views

shared by leventmetu on 05 Nov 13 - No Cached
Ceren Ocak liked it
  •  
    It was an informing video about the basics of situated cognition, I wish that whole essays can be transformed into videos :) It was nice to support with perssonal experiencec with theory
Evrim Baran

http://ccli-nsf.wikispaces.com/file/view/cognitive+consequences+of+formal+and+informal+education.pdf - 2 views

  •  
    Here is the Scribner and Cole (1973) article mentioned in Chapter 2 on informal learning. Worth to read.
Pınar Mercan Küçükakın

Cognitive Tutor students demonstrate lower failure rates than standard algebra curriculum students. - 1 views

  •  
    Pınar, I think Carnegie Learning "Success Stories" page does not provide the information whether the research group uses the tutoring system as additional or supportive on top of the control group's traditional lesson content. So if the research group only used the tutoring system then it is a significant result.
  •  
    I think it was a supportive program because in the report it was stated that the Cognitive Tutor Algebra I curriculum consisted of classroom instruction, software sessions, and text. However, the information provided in the report is not sufficient to make an evaluation of the program, other variables might have influenced the results.
afranur

Dyned - 2 views

shared by afranur on 09 Nov 13 - No Cached
  •  
    Mostly probably all of you are familiar with Dyned. It is an interactive software for learning English and it is a quite good innovation in the field of computer assisted language learning. It is tired to be used in the public schools and Turkish Ministry of Education supports this.
  • ...2 more comments...
  •  
    I used Dyned in my classes for years or I shoud say I tried to use it:) It is really hard to use technology in public schools and also Dyned is a problematic program in terms of various aspects. However, it was really surprising that all the students were eager to login in the system and use Dyned. I really wonder whether it would make any difference in student achievement if Dyned was used in schools properly.
  •  
    We have a similar program in my workplace, "Azarinteractive". However, students are extra demotivated to use it though they have chance to practice listening and so forth. I think you are lucky Pınar, to have eager students to use such a tool. :)))
  •  
    So perhaps, "motivation" is an important issue to consider with cognitive tutors. Let's cover some of the motivational aspects of cognitive tutors and intelligent tutoring systems in class.
  •  
    I think when sts are first introduced with such programs, they display high motivation. They are eager to find the secrets of the program. However, as time passes and as they get used to the style of the program, their motivation decreases since there are no secrets anymore. Therefore, in my opinion, to keep their motivation at its highest level, each module (if it's modular) should introduce new ways of learning.
ibrahim tanrikulu

Pos and Cons of Cognitive intelligent tutoring systems - 2 views

  •  
    Naturally, there are some disadvantages of cognitive intelligent tutroring systems.
  • ...3 more comments...
  •  
    thank you for the source, I liked the way it's organized also, one pro and then one con :)
  •  
    It pushed me to think about both pro and cons of it. Thank you İbrahim.
  •  
    Thanks for the source:-) As far as I understood, some benefits of these programs are based on some assumptions. For instance, these programs assume that learners are autonomous. That's why they are mostly useful with adults. Or the expertise of the online tutor. The assumption behind is that they are better than the ones in the classroom. Therefore, each benefit brings its risks...
  •  
    Thank you İbrahim, I think the con about distraction is very important (It requires more discipline, Your child would have to keep his focus on the screen without getting distracted by emails, IM's or Facebook.) Any ideas to prevent getting distracted?
  •  
    For me it is important to be aware of that in foreign language instruction, the movement of your mouth can be really important in getting pronunciation right. That's harder to teach online. If the subject or homework assignment specifically requires the child to write on paper, it's much harder for an online tutor to read along with the student. So it works better for some subjects
özge dışbudak

Cognitive Tutoring - 0 views

Hi all :), here, there is a little information about cognitve tuturing and some advantages and disadvantages of it

http:__www.powershow.com_view1_247bc5-ZDc1Z_Cognitive_Tutors_powerpoint_ppt_presentation tutoring cognitive

started by özge dışbudak on 04 Nov 14 no follow-up yet
haticekiz

Situated Learning Theory- Jean Lave - 0 views

  •  
    This video is similar to Sibel's but there are some different examples. Here are some interesting points; Jean Lave argues that situated learning does not need to be authentic always because there is algebra. Also she says that the situation must have cognitive complexity. She points that social networks can be used to enable learning environment.
armagan_metu

How Handwriting Trains the Brain - 3 views

  •  
    An article about how handwriting, due to hand's special relation with brain, affect learning foreign languages or cognitive development.
Erdem Uygun

Learning Sciences Research Institute at University of Ilınoi - 1 views

  • No one else does what we do.
  •  
    They say "No one else does what we do" while mentioning their interdisciplinary approach. They say that "The learning sciences field emerged more than two decades ago after researchers found that what worked in a laboratory simply did not hold up with real children, teachers, classrooms and workplaces. They saw that learning technologies, which held great promise for solving education's problems, were not being transferred to classrooms and schools. Cognitive scientists, educational and instructional psychologists, and computer scientists worked together to put their ideas and knowledge to use to improve the learning outcomes for a diverse group." The institute basically do two things: 1 - They identify the critical challenges in education, literacy, mathematics, science and the social sciences. 2- They work to find solutions. Their main aim is to create learning systems for 21st century classrooms thanks to interdisciplinary research in teaching and learning. They believe that learning is a complex process and so they get benefit from different disciplines (e.g. anthropology, computer science, education, linguistics, psychology and sociology) to share knowledge and best practices on education. At their another webpage, they define learning science as a science which "focuses on how to create new, improved and equitable learning environments for 21st century learners.". In order accomplish this, they focus on four questions: 1- How do people learn? 2- What do we want them to know and be able to do? 3- How can we design learning environments that help them learn? 4- How can we monitor what they are learning? They offer a Ph.D. program to raise future learning scientists.
yasinay

Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math - 3 views

  •  
    I have seen this post when I was searching for how can interaction with peers contribute to learning maths. It is written by ROBERT SUN who is the CEO of Suntex International and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for deep practice in mathematics. The things that are mentioned felt very similar with our country's situation actually, as learners how do we use concepts of maths (or any other courses) except from school? May be the first reason for our students cannot learn and hate maths is behind this question.
  •  
    "Teachers can encourage their students to express themselves verbally using mathematical terms; even in the early grades, children can be asked to explain what they want or mean using numbers, or relationships between numbers. Anything that encourages them to talk about math and mathematical concepts is beneficial." Social math!. It looks like article emphasizes the importance of language in information exchange. It reminds me Vygotsky's socio-cultural theory in which he also believed that language is important for learning. He also purported that language is culture-dependent so each cultures' learning may be different from each other. In addition, providing opportunity to students to express themselves verbally can give us clues about current mental maps of students as to a specific topic (what is correct, what needs improvement, etc.). In addition, students can transfer their transformed ideas (ideas transformed from scholarly language to level-appropriate language) to their friends which can facilitate their learning.
  •  
    Yasin, I am curious to hear about some of the contemporary approaches towards teaching Math, a subject generally taught with more traditional methods. Regarding mathphobia, we also need to think about the culture that stimulates that.
nehirkv

Situated Cognitive - 0 views

  •  
    This video is about how an expert can lead the novice through learning process
‹ Previous 21 - 40 of 91 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page