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armagan_metu

Beyond Amplification - 1 views

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    In this article Roy Pea, who is one of the pioneers of learning sciences, discussing how computers are changing our cognitive lifes beyond amplifying. Article first supports this proposition, then discusses implications of applying computer-based technologies into education. Lastly it suggests updating educational practices in order to be harmonious with this new emerging cognitive life. This article is also important for being quite early, it constitutes one of the foot stones of the learning sciences area.
armagan_metu

How Handwriting Trains the Brain - 3 views

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    An article about how handwriting, due to hand's special relation with brain, affect learning foreign languages or cognitive development.
haticekiz

Situated Learning Theory- Jean Lave - 0 views

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    This video is similar to Sibel's but there are some different examples. Here are some interesting points; Jean Lave argues that situated learning does not need to be authentic always because there is algebra. Also she says that the situation must have cognitive complexity. She points that social networks can be used to enable learning environment.
yasinay

Why Social Interaction Is Essential To Learning Math - 3 views

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    I have seen this post when I was searching for how can interaction with peers contribute to learning maths. It is written by ROBERT SUN who is the CEO of Suntex International and inventor of First In Math, an online program designed for deep practice in mathematics. The things that are mentioned felt very similar with our country's situation actually, as learners how do we use concepts of maths (or any other courses) except from school? May be the first reason for our students cannot learn and hate maths is behind this question.
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    "Teachers can encourage their students to express themselves verbally using mathematical terms; even in the early grades, children can be asked to explain what they want or mean using numbers, or relationships between numbers. Anything that encourages them to talk about math and mathematical concepts is beneficial." Social math!. It looks like article emphasizes the importance of language in information exchange. It reminds me Vygotsky's socio-cultural theory in which he also believed that language is important for learning. He also purported that language is culture-dependent so each cultures' learning may be different from each other. In addition, providing opportunity to students to express themselves verbally can give us clues about current mental maps of students as to a specific topic (what is correct, what needs improvement, etc.). In addition, students can transfer their transformed ideas (ideas transformed from scholarly language to level-appropriate language) to their friends which can facilitate their learning.
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    Yasin, I am curious to hear about some of the contemporary approaches towards teaching Math, a subject generally taught with more traditional methods. Regarding mathphobia, we also need to think about the culture that stimulates that.
Mine Önal

Learning Theories - 1 views

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    There are many theories in this page that we should be interested in in this page as learning sciences students. An example of two groundbreaking research results in learning sciences is (1) Entwistle's Phenomenography theory This conceptual framework focuses on the experience of learning from the student's perspective and is based upon a phenomenological approach to research. Entwistle explains: "Our task is thus to describe more clearly how learning takes place in higher education and to point out how teaching and assessment affect the quality of learning. From these descriptions teachers should be able to draw their own lessons about how to facilitate their students' learning" (Marton, Hounsell & Entwistle, 1984, p.1). (2) Festinger's Cognitive Dissonance Theory According to cognitive dissonance theory, there is a tendency for individuals to seek consistency among their cognitions (i.e., beliefs, opinions). When there is an inconsistency between attitudes or behaviors (dissonance), something must change to eliminate the dissonance. In the case of a discrepancy between attitudes and behavior, it is most likely that the attitude will change to accommodate the behavior.
Hatice Çilsalar

Brain's connective cells are much more than glue: Glia cells also regulate learning and... - 1 views

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    This paper can help us neuroscience week… It is too interesting New research indicates that glia cells are "the brain's supervisors." By regulating the synapses, they control the transfer of information between neurons, affecting how the brain processes information. This new finding could be critical for technologies based on brain networks, as well as provide a new avenue for research into disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.
Defne Kara

Views on Cognitive Tutoring in Carneige Learning Centre - 0 views

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    The site gives an overview of Cognitive Tutoring experiences of K-12 Education teachers and students in Carneige Learning Centre. They talk about the benefits and so.
Hatice Çilsalar

Cognitive load theory - 0 views

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    Tihs video presents a brief explanation of Cognitive load theory that we mentioned in last week. I hope you like it.
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    I liked the definition of expertise as "acquisition of schemas" or mental structure. We talked about these in our discussion through organization of knowledge and chunking.
Mustafa İlkhan

What is cognitive load? - 0 views

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    I know it's related to our previous topic, but still I like the way she explains; a clear model of the thousands of little things that have to happen as we move from novice to expert and wanted to share with you.
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    We will talk more about cognitive load theory and its implications in education research later this semester. Thanks for sharing.
haticekiz

E- government: A Course in Situated Learning - 2 views

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    This is a nice little newsletter that mentions some characteristics of situated learning. Some resources on situated learning and its usage in learning environments are offered !
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    I liked this source too much. As the role of the teacher: "The instructor's role moves from providing and structuring the information and knowledge through lectures and presentations to modeling, coaching, and scaffolding learners as they use information and create knowledge to solve contextual real-life problems". I ask myself: To what extent, I create such authentic environments in my classes.
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    That is such an inevitable and reasonable concern; the extent we imply authentic environments in our classrooms. Sometimes it is for the sake of applying without including the essential elements of authentic learning. Time concerns or motivation and knowledge levels of teachers might be some issues related.
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    Firstly, it was a nice source to read, thanks for sharing it. I agree with you time concerns, teacher and student charateristics are prominent to implement the principles of situated learning in practice. It is really difficult to create authentic learning environment in our classes under the stess of keeping up with the curriculum which is based on traditional theories of learning. Thus, it is the work of the curriculum specialists to revise the curricula to be more in line with the improvements in the field of learning sciences.
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    There is a case study which I really advise you to look at it. It is about a political course in which they took a government's problem about content and design of websites. He says "given all the considerations at work in municipal government, the students will decide how the power of the web can best be brought to bear on making government work better."
Burcu Korkusuz

Contemporary Learning Theories - 3 views

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    Contemporary Theories of Learning - Learning Theorists...in Their Own Words - Knud Illeris >>> http://tr.scribd.com/doc/152409290/Contemporary-Theories-of-Learning-Learning-Theorists-in-Their-Own-Words-Knud-Illeris#download
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    Thank you for the source, I found it last week too and I believe it is a very comprehensive source that can guide us in this course.
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    Thanks for sharing the link. I found it in the METU library too. I can bring it to our class on Thursday. We can benefit from it for the discussion sessions or refer to it in our personal learning theories.
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