Skip to main content

Home/ KY women and civil rights history/ Group items matching "women resources" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
aplatonic 3

Mary McLeod Bethune with a ... - World Digital Library - 0 views

  • une was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader. Born Mary Jane McLeod on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, the daughter of former slaves, Bethune won scholarships to attend Scotia Seminary in Concord, North Carolina (now Barber-Scotia College), and the Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago (now the Moody Bible Institute). In 1904, she moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, to found her own school. Her one-room school house became the Daytona Normal and Industrial School for Negro Girls before merging with Cookman Institute for Boys in 1923. The merged school later affiliated with the United Methodist Church and became the historically-black college named in her honor, Bethune-Cookman College (now Bethune-Cookman University). In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency. She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955. Date Created Around 1905 Place North America > United States of America > Florida > Daytona Beach Time 1900 AD - 1949 AD Topic Social sciences > Political science > Civil & political rights Social sciences > Education > Schools & their activities; special education Additional Subjects African American girls ; African Americans--Segregation ; Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955 ; Women ; Women's history Type of Item Prints, Photographs Physical Description 1 negative: black and white; 4 x 5 inches Institution State Library and Archives of Florida External Resource http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.wdl/ftasa.4013
  • Mary McLeod Bethune was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader.
  • In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955.
Mary __

Important women throughout Kentucky's history - 3 views

  •  
    I think that this article gives a good insight into the influential women that have come out of Kentucky. It gives brief descriptions of each of the women. This could be a very helpful resource to look back at which women were the most influential.
  •  
    Many influential artists, sculpture and painters came from Kentucky that were women. I too grew up in Louisville like many of these artists and found it cool that a scultpture from louisville did the Daniel Boone sculpture in Cherokee Park.
tiger lily

Laura Clay - 3 views

  • Lexington's Sayre School
  • an unusually powerful position for a southern girl in the 1860's when any woman demonstrating intellect was considered a "bluestocking" doomed to spinsterhood.
  • Their resulting divorce in 1878 was the turning point in all of the Clay women's lives. According to laws at the time, a woman held no claim to house or property
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • the Clay women turned to the equalizing of women's rights.
  • Laura decided to lease White Hall from her father
  • She then collaborated with Susan B. Anthony to organize suffrage societies across the Commonwealth
  • During this same period, Clay became the best-known southern suffragist and the South's leading voice in the councils of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). While chair of the association's membership committee, she introduced recruiting innovations that almost tripled the number of members, from 17,000 in 1905 to 45,501 in 1907, and succeeded in establishing associations in nine southern states.
  • Clay was an emancipationist; one who believed that it was up to each state to grant freedom/rights to citizens
  • Clay was also a believer in Anglo-Saxon superiority but was paternalistic in her attitudes. A product of her time and region, this hearkening back to Southern pre-Civil War beliefs caused some critics to castigate her as a racist.
  • She also worked to promote the involvement of women in politics, advocating that women not silently accept the party affiliation of their husbands, but instead form and act upon their own beliefs.
  •  
    The beginning of this article is a great biography. The best part of this piece was being able to find out more about her positions on states rights and whether she believed in civil rights for blacks as well. Clay was a major supporter of states rights. In all that she did for women's rights ( a list is given at the end) Clay was not an advocate for the rights of African Americans. 
  •  
    I found it unique that Laura Clay began to pursue womens equal rights after her parents seperated. Her mother took care of the White Hall estate for 45 years and then was all the sudden homeless because the property belonged to the father according to the laws that prevented women from owning land. This left Laura and her sisters to pursue the equality of women. She was also responsible for creating the Kentucky Equal Rights Organization with the help of Susan B. Anthony.
  •  
    This site has a short but very informative biography of Laura Clay. Along with a biography it list all of her monumental accomplishment fighting for equal rights. The site is full of pictures of Laura Clay and is very well documented with numerous sources citing the information.
Mary __

Influential Women in The Civil Rights Era - 2 views

  •  
    While looking around on the internet to try and find more about women in the civil rights era I came across this link that talks a about a book that would be a good resource for our class and possibly some group projects. Its a book about women in the Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965. I don't know if it would help but it might!
  •  
    It's definitley a book that I would look through if it is available at the library
aplatonic 3

Women and Social Movements in the United States - 0 views

  •  
    Women and Social Movements in the United States is a resource for students and scholars of U.S. history and U.S. Women's history. Organized around the history of Women in social movements in the U.S. between 1600 and 2000, this collection seeks to advance scholarly debates and understanding about U.S. history generally at the same time that it makes the insights of Women's history accessible to teachers and students at universities, colleges, and high schools.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Women on the Rails: Nebraska Suffragists and the Railroad - 0 views

  •  
    Very cool open knowledge initiative focusing on history of women in Nebraska in the Gilded Age.
Randolph Hollingsworth

KY Longterm Policy Research Comm - Publications on Women, 1994-2010 - 1 views

  •  
    Good to use as a resource since many of the items include summaries of 20th century Kentucky women's history
Randolph Hollingsworth

women civil rights workers - 11 oral history interviews - Documenting the American South - 0 views

  •  
    UNC's wonderful open educational resource offers up transcripts and .mp3 files of oral history interviews by such great historians as Jacquelyn Hall Dowd and Sue Thrasher.
Wes _

Voices from the Gaps: University of Minnesota - 2 views

  •  
    This resource is devoted to "Women Writers and Artist of color". This is similar to what our class is doing just with a wider national scope.
  •  
    The various and different works that are provided from the website are both enlightening and interesting. The fact that a database now exists with such a wide variety of published material from women of all races and backgrounds in one place is cool to know about and explore.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Filling the Skills Gap in Manufacturing: The Untapped Resource | The Aspen Institute - 0 views

  •  
    "a main barrier to a strong resurgence in the manufacturing sector is the need for more skilled workers. Women are increasingly outperforming men in acquiring advanced skills and college degrees, yet are vastly underrepresented in the manufacturing workforce. This growing sector would greatly benefit from a more diverse workforce that taps into this talent pool."
Randolph Hollingsworth

Center for Research on Violence Against Women - Univ of KY - 1 views

  •  
    NOTE: Carol Jordan has been leading a "Fundraising effort launched to complete two endowed chairs while honoring former Senator Georgia Davis Powers and former First Lady Judi Conway Patton."
Randolph Hollingsworth

EmmaGuyCromwell-KLGAL-ULPA-1994.18.1662 - 2 views

  •  
    Portrait of Emma Guy Cromwell, who served as Secretary of State of Kentucky from 1924-1928. She is wearing an elaborate velvet textured dress and long necklace, clutching it with both hands. The photograph has been creased in the top corner and what could be a fan drawn into the back of her hair. Digital ID: KLGAL-ULPA-1994.18.1662 From Herald-Post Collection, ca. 1925 - 1936, University of Louisville Photographic Archives, http://name.kdl.kyvl.org/KLGAL-ULPA-1994.18.1662 Resources such as digital images, digital audio and electronic texts are made available by the Kentuckiana Digital Library for use in research, instruction or private study only. These materials can never be used for commercial purposes without explicit, prior written permission from the copyright owner. Permissions and copies for University of Louisville Images Special Collections: Photographic Archives and Rare Books Phone: (502) 852-6752 Email: Special.Collections@louisville.edu Website: http://library.louisville.edu/ekstrom/special/rights.html
Jamsasha Pierce

Notable Kentucky African Americans - - 4 views

  • She was one of the first African American woman from Kentucky to enlist during World War II, the first to become an officer, and the first African American WAC over an all-white regiment. Clarke led the protest that desegregated the Douglas Army Airfield theater.
  •  
    Here's a compilation of many different resources on Kentucky resourcest during World War II. Needs exploring by the class very interesting.
  •  
    Thank you for this website! I find it very interesting to read about because I am joining the military. It is very informative and like you said interesting to read about!
  •  
    This site provides a ton of information regarding the tough road most African Americans had to take in order to be treated with dignity and respect in the military, espically women.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research - 0 views

  •  
    Wonderful resources available here at the website for the UofL Anne Braden Institute - the Director is Dr. Cate Fosl who is joining us on Nov 18th with the AASRP Dialogues on Race session on Anne Braden.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Emma Guy Cromwell bio on KY Secretary of State website - 6 views

  •  
    Useful snapshot of Cromwell's political life and bio as part of the official Kentucky government's website; many of the statements were supplied to the researcher by a descendent and several of the resources are outdated.
tiger lily

Frances - 2 views

  •  
    The Kentucky Encyclopedia has a biography on any well known or prominent person in the stats history. It is an excellent resource with in its self to look up anyone and know quickly who they were and what they did. Frances Beauchamp is documented with in this Encyclopedia. She was a temperance advocate and president of the Woman Christian Temperance Union.
1 - 16 of 16
Showing 20 items per page