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Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc.com - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
  •  
    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
  •  
    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
aplatonic 3

Women's Clubs - 0 views

  • Women'S Clubs are voluntary organizations that were originally formed by Women who had been denied access to the major institutions of America's democratic civil society.
  • Working women formed working girls' clubs and small-town women formed civic improvement associations. In bigger cities, women organized citywide and neighborhood women's clubs and women's educational and industrial unions. Ethnic, church-based, African American, and settlement house women's clubs were founded across the country.
  • Although women continued to belong to literary, social, and charitable clubs, the majority of women's clubs organized after the Civil War had specific civic and political agendas. The specific purposes of each club differed according to the type of club and its stated purpose.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Another common goal of women's clubs was to bring more social justice into American society. Thus, women's clubs worked to implement factory inspection laws, to place limits on the number of hours in the working day, to eliminate child labor, to institute the juvenile justice system, and to raise the minimum age for compulsory education. African American women's clubs fought against lynching, racial segregation, and discrimination. Catholic and Jewish women's clubs attracted women of those faiths who may not have felt comfortable in other women's clubs; these women were able to work for social justice within their organizations, which also paid special attention to the problems encountered by the particular religious group.
  • Women's club members believed that in order to accomplish most of their aims they had to organize networks of Women's clubs.
  • Membership in women's clubs changed after the woman suffrage amendment greatly expanded women's access to civic activism through organizations previously closed to them.
  • The entry of women into public life has been reflected in the programs of their clubs, which show an increasing interest in questions of social welfare and international concern. Many town libraries, later supported by taxes, were started by women's clubs, and many health and welfare reforms have been initiated by them. The feminist movement also influenced women's clubs, especially by spurring the establishment of groups such as the National Organization for women (founded 1966), which are explicitly devoted to the expansion of women's rights.
Mary __

Kentucky.com two women receive WWII medals - 3 views

  •  
    Two women receive medals for their service in the military. They are from Wilmore these could be two women that could help with the oral history and give more insight into how women were treated in WWII as nurses.
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    I think that's a fantastic idea Mary. I just read the article and these women are very interesting.
flamenco clap

The Project Gutenberg eBook of Citizenship; a Manual for Voters, by Emma Guy Cromwell. - 24 views

  • Citizenship
  • civil rights
  • We must be familiar with our national and state Constitutions
  • ...69 more annotations...
  • Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting.
  • Civil rights and political rights are not the same,
    • charlie v
       
      Political rights and civil rights are not the same, but political rules and rights should not cut into a persons civil rights
  • The way to get good government is through the parties; that is one reason women must choose their party and enter into the organization of the party of their choice.
  • The United States is both a Democracy and a Republic. A Democracy is a government by the people in which the will of the people prevails throughout the country. "This is the fundamental principle of American government." A Republic is a democracy where the people elect representatives to carry on the government.
  • Constitution is the foundation upon which our government is built
  • There are now forty-eight states in the United States with forty-eight constitutions framed upon the Federal Constitution. Each state has its own constitution, which in no way conflicts with the Federal Constitution.
  • first Constitution of Kentucky was adopted April 3, 1792, at a convention that met in Danville, and later on June 1st, 1792, Kentucky was admitted into the union as a state.
  • An amendment to the Kentucky Constitution requires a three-fifths vote of the members in both houses of the legislature to pass, and then it is submitted by the General Assembly to the voters of the State, which requires a majority of the voters to be adopted.
  • There are now eighteen amendments to the Federal Constitution. The nineteenth amendment on "Suffrage" is still pending, needing only one more state to give universal suffrage to women.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Was KY the second to last to ratify the 19th ammendment? Why so long? Ties as a southern state?
  • The citizen who does not possess some knowledge of his government and its workings will become a prey to the demagogue, or of individuals who are anxious to advance their own interest at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      How does one trust a politian, even if you are involved in the current events of the day?
  • Parties are just what their constituents make them.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      I like this simple description. Now if we could keep the interpretation as simple.
  • trial by jury is composed of twelve men,
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Not yet appropriate for women?
  • As long as men and women think for themselves we shall have political parties.
  • A person with no opinion on public affairs is a coward and unpatriotic.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Very provoking! Not to mention esteem to become educated.
  • Citizenship
  • Citizenship
  • As a test of one's love
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Stron conservative woman emphasizeing patriotism.
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Copyright 1920
    • Syle Khaw
       
      This manual was created before Tennessee ratified the 19th amendment.
  • a sponger, a coward and a shirker
    • Syle Khaw
       
      Cromwell shows that being a good citizen is part of your moral core and noone would want to be accused of being lazy or bad because it's an insult.
  • Copyright 1920
  • Copyright 1920
  • have the vote and let us not only count it a privilege but a duty to do our part as citizens in establishing good
  • good government
  • government
  • government
  • government.
  • no state constitution can conflict with our Federal Constitution
  • The Federal Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of each House of Congress, and if passed must be referred to the state legislatures for ratification
  • no law will stand in our courts that is in violation of our National Constitution.
    • Syle Khaw
       
      this shows complete faith in our National Constitution
  • To be an intelligent and desirable citizen we must have a knowledge of our Constitution, and know by whom and how our country is governed. The man or woman who does not possess some knowledge of how the country is governed—as has been said—may easily become a prey of persons who are anxious to advance their own interests at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      A prevailing problem.
  • There are four ways which we, as citizens, can help maintain our government: [Pg 59]"First: Vote at every election, read and be interested in public affairs. "Second: Help to manage public affairs and be ready to hold an office, if you are the choice of the people. "Third: Try to understand public questions, so you can vote intelligently and criticize justly. "Fourth: Remember to pay your share of the expense of doing the work."
  • The voting place is the leveling place, and when women realize that the exercise of suffrage gives not only the equal right to vote, but also allows equal expression of opinion, then the better purpose of woman suffrage will have been accomplished.
  • Only white persons and negroes may become naturalized. "Chinese, Japanese and East Indians cannot become citizens unless born in the United States." Unmarried women can become citizens like the men. A married woman is a citizen if her husband is a citizen. She cannot become naturalized by herself. A woman born in the United States who marries an alien ceases to be an American citizen and becomes a subject of the country to which her husband belongs. The wife of a man not a citizen of the United States cannot vote in this country.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      One condition after another in preventing a woman form having eqality.
  • There are now over 27,011,330 voting women in the United States, soon to take part in all elections, and share the responsibility as well as the privilege of suffrage.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      It would be interesting to see statistical camparisons and voting paterns (populations) from this number to the first two decades of 2000.
  • Let the women of our country come forward and identify themselves with the party of their choice and organize under competent leaders, showing to the world we not only deem it a great privilege to vote, but are willing to share the responsibility of making our government the best in the world.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Let her no longer fear to proclaim her independence!
  • A citizen is one who has the rights and privileges of the inhabitants of the community, state and nation, and as a duty should equip himself so as to render the best citizenship possible.
    • Jamsasha Pierce
       
      As a citizen it is important to practice your political rights. Voting allows you to be an active citizen and to get your point across.
  • A state Constitution cannot interfere with the Federal Constitution, neither can the Federal Constitution interfere with the regulation of the state.
  • ecause it is only in this way that there can be a fair expression of the political sentiment of the qualified voters on any question.
  • Kentucky has one hundred and twenty counties
  • Kentucky has eleven congressional districts, therefore eleven congressmen elected by the people.
    • granestrella
       
      Referencing the Suffragists but appealing to the Maternalists as well
  • improve and protect the home, the church and the community.
  • It is the duty of every man and woman under the protection of our flag to give his or her best to the country and be willing to take upon themselves the burden as well as the privilege of government, and fully appreciate the inheritance our fathers left.
    • granestrella
       
      This is true today even though too few people will take responsibility for the actions of their country.
    • granestrella
       
      This draws the line between then and now and how far the image of the 'upstanding' citizen has come since the civil rights era.
    • granestrella
       
      This feels abandoned in modern Kentucky. We tend to operate on a county by county basis now from what I can tell.
    • granestrella
       
      Political apathy is HUGE today and a major problem among youth. It should be the job of a 'citizen' to invigorate those without an opinion.
  • composed of one man
  • The convention is opened with prayer.
    • granestrella
       
      This is almost comical. The images kind of detract from the seriousness of the matter.
    • granestrella
       
      Religion clearly shaped politics
  • The expense of our government is enormous, but the paying of taxes is one way in which all must take part.
    • granestrella
       
      I have to agree that taxation is necessary for an established government. The trouble has come with the accumulationof external   debts that the public is expected to repay.
  • Porto Rico.
    • granestrella
       
      Really? Why on Earth is it spelled this way?
  • We are not patriotic unless we respond to the call of our government.
    • granestrella
       
      In agreement with my stance on current definitions of citizenship
    • granestrella
       
      This is entirely contradictory.
    • granestrella
       
      Without a doubt, this is true today.
    • granestrella
       
      I believe all of these are still relevant except the second bullet.
  • Another reason is that the right to vote is not only a privilege but a duty that is imposed by law, and where one is entitled to exercise that privilege, the failure to so exercise it is a failure to perform a duty on the part of the voter.
    • granestrella
       
      YES! This is an idea people still don't seem to understand but the discrepancy now falls among age groups rather than gender
  • A strong appeal is made to the women voters of our nation to prepare themselves for public life
  • let us not forget that the home is the most sacred refuge of life
    • flamenco clap
       
      this refers to maternalists and suffragists, appealing to different types of women
  •  
    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
  •  
    This manual by Cromwell is not only free and open, but useful in many ways when studying or researching citizenship. Cromwell lists points in her work that cover all aspects of how to be a good citizen. She does this by referencing our constitution and laws and how we should follow them.
  •  
    "Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting."
aplatonic 3

Mary McLeod Bethune with a ... - World Digital Library - 0 views

  • une was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader. Born Mary Jane McLeod on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, the daughter of former slaves, Bethune won scholarships to attend Scotia Seminary in Concord, North Carolina (now Barber-Scotia College), and the Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago (now the Moody Bible Institute). In 1904, she moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, to found her own school. Her one-room school house became the Daytona Normal and Industrial School for Negro Girls before merging with Cookman Institute for Boys in 1923. The merged school later affiliated with the United Methodist Church and became the historically-black college named in her honor, Bethune-Cookman College (now Bethune-Cookman University). In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency. She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955. Date Created Around 1905 Place North America > United States of America > Florida > Daytona Beach Time 1900 AD - 1949 AD Topic Social sciences > Political science > Civil & political rights Social sciences > Education > Schools & their activities; special education Additional Subjects African American girls ; African Americans--Segregation ; Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955 ; Women ; Women's history Type of Item Prints, Photographs Physical Description 1 negative: black and white; 4 x 5 inches Institution State Library and Archives of Florida External Resource http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.wdl/ftasa.4013
  • Mary McLeod Bethune was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader.
  • In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955.
Mary __

Important women throughout Kentucky's history - 3 views

  •  
    I think that this article gives a good insight into the influential women that have come out of Kentucky. It gives brief descriptions of each of the women. This could be a very helpful resource to look back at which women were the most influential.
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    Many influential artists, sculpture and painters came from Kentucky that were women. I too grew up in Louisville like many of these artists and found it cool that a scultpture from louisville did the Daniel Boone sculpture in Cherokee Park.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Making Our Voices Heard - 1999 - Genie Potter, KCW - 1 views

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    The opening section of "The Future Well-Being of Women in Kentucky" published in 1999 as a response to the "Report on the Status of Women in Kentucky" - I enjoyed very much the many meetings and conversations with a diverse group of Women activists from all over Kentucky that were involved in the making of this report. (NOTE: to progress through this e-book, it works best if you simply change the chapter number in the URL because the hyperlinks among pages are not always consistent.)
Randolph Hollingsworth

The Sexual Victimization of College Women - National Institute of Justice Report 2000 - 0 views

  •  
    "College campuses host large concentrations of young women who are at greater risk for rape and other forms of sexual assault than women in the general population or in a comparable age group. Based on their findings, Bonnie Fisher and her colleagues estimate that the women at a college that has 10,000 female students could experience more than 350 rapes a year- a finding with serious policy implications for college administrators."
charlie v

The University of Louisville's Women's Center - 0 views

  •  
    I really liked what the University of Louisville was doing to try to impower the lives of the women students and the women living in Jefferson County. The goal of the women's Center is to promote equality between men and women, increase the self reliance of women and to display and demonstrate everything that women do for society. The goal is to change the mindset of both men and women who are living in a different era and to show that women are capable of accomplishing anything that a man is capable of accomplishing.
Big Bird

Women in Military - Lt. Anna Mac Clarke - 2 views

  •  
    Since I just came back from active duty, I found this biography of Lt. Anna Mac Clarke very interesting. She was an African American woman born in Lawrenceburg, KY and was the first female, African American female, to be specific, to command an all-white unit. I feel that this brief article not only demonstrates the magnitude of such an accomplishment, but that it also provides wonderful insight about a topic that deserves much more attention: women in the military. With both the historical background and significance of this article, I think others will find it just as useful.
  •  
    This article is very interesting. It is hard to believe that an African American women who led an all white group of troops late in her military career was subject to swimming in the pool at her base camp in Iowa only for one hour a week on fridays, after the pool was sanitized. Lt. Clarke had to be a strong willed women who was constantly challenged in her military life due to the fact of being black and a women. The majority of the army being white men, this race and gender issue must of been a challenge each and everyday.
tiger lily

Laura Clay - 3 views

  • Lexington's Sayre School
  • an unusually powerful position for a southern girl in the 1860's when any woman demonstrating intellect was considered a "bluestocking" doomed to spinsterhood.
  • Their resulting divorce in 1878 was the turning point in all of the Clay women's lives. According to laws at the time, a woman held no claim to house or property
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • the Clay women turned to the equalizing of women's rights.
  • Laura decided to lease White Hall from her father
  • She then collaborated with Susan B. Anthony to organize suffrage societies across the Commonwealth
  • During this same period, Clay became the best-known southern suffragist and the South's leading voice in the councils of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). While chair of the association's membership committee, she introduced recruiting innovations that almost tripled the number of members, from 17,000 in 1905 to 45,501 in 1907, and succeeded in establishing associations in nine southern states.
  • Clay was an emancipationist; one who believed that it was up to each state to grant freedom/rights to citizens
  • Clay was also a believer in Anglo-Saxon superiority but was paternalistic in her attitudes. A product of her time and region, this hearkening back to Southern pre-Civil War beliefs caused some critics to castigate her as a racist.
  • She also worked to promote the involvement of women in politics, advocating that women not silently accept the party affiliation of their husbands, but instead form and act upon their own beliefs.
  •  
    The beginning of this article is a great biography. The best part of this piece was being able to find out more about her positions on states rights and whether she believed in civil rights for blacks as well. Clay was a major supporter of states rights. In all that she did for women's rights ( a list is given at the end) Clay was not an advocate for the rights of African Americans. 
  •  
    I found it unique that Laura Clay began to pursue womens equal rights after her parents seperated. Her mother took care of the White Hall estate for 45 years and then was all the sudden homeless because the property belonged to the father according to the laws that prevented women from owning land. This left Laura and her sisters to pursue the equality of women. She was also responsible for creating the Kentucky Equal Rights Organization with the help of Susan B. Anthony.
  •  
    This site has a short but very informative biography of Laura Clay. Along with a biography it list all of her monumental accomplishment fighting for equal rights. The site is full of pictures of Laura Clay and is very well documented with numerous sources citing the information.
Claire Johns

The My Hero Project - Women Had Key Roles in Civil Rights EraWomen_CivilRights_AP - 3 views

  •  
    Another great article explaining the behind the scenes roles of black women in the civil rights movement. Also, this includes some of the more famous of these women
  •  
    ``After the bus boycott got going and (Martin Luther) King got involved, they wouldn't even let Rosa Parks speak at the first mass meeting,'' she said. ``She asked to speak, and one of the ministers said he thought she had done enough.'' That is so insanely demeaning! I wonder who in the movement was propagating that repression of women's voices, MLK himself seemed very willing to engage women, at least in the Anne Braden reading. Great article, i agree.
Jamsasha Pierce

feminism :: The second wave of feminism -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia - 1 views

  • The second wave of feminism <script src="http://adserver.adtechus.com/addyn/3.0/5308.1/1371336/0/170/ADTECH;target=_blank;grp=550;key=false;kvqsegs=D:T:2886:1362:1359:1357:1346:1341;kvtopicid=724633;kvchannel=HISTORY;misc=1291082559495"></script> The women’s movement of the 1960s and ’70s, the so-called “second wave” of feminism, represented a seemingly abrupt break with the tranquil suburban life pictured in American popular culture. Yet the roots of the new rebellion were buried in the frustrations of college-educated mothers whose discontent impelled their daughters in a new direction. If first-wave feminists were inspired by the abolition movement, their great-granddaughters were swept into feminism by the civil rights movement, the attendant discussion of principles such as equality and justice, and the revolutionary ferment caused by protests against the Vietnam War. women’s concerns were on Pres. John F. Kennedy’s agenda even before this public discussion began. In 1961 he created the President’s Commission on the Status of women and<script src="http://adserver.adtechus.com/addyn/3.0/5308.1/1388674/0/170/ADTECH;target=_blank;grp=550;key=false;kvqsegs=D:T:2886:1362:1359:1357:1346:1341;kvtopicid=724633;kvchannel=HISTORY;misc=1291082559533"></script> appointed Eleanor Roosevelt to lead it. Its report, issued in 1963, firmly supported the nuclear family and preparing women for motherhood. But it also documented a national pattern of employment discrimination, unequal pay, legal inequality, and meagre support services for working women that needed to be corrected through legislative guarantees of equal pay for equal work, equal job opportunities, and expanded child-care services. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 offered the first guarantee, and the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was amended to bar employers from discriminating on the basis of sex. Some deemed these measures insufficient in a country where classified advertisements still segregated job openings by sex, where state laws restricted women’s access to contraception, and where incidences of rape and domestic violence remained undisclosed. In the late 1960s, then, the notion of a women’s rights movement took root at the same time as the civil rights movement, and women of all ages and circumstances were swept up in debates about gender, discrimination, and the nature of equality.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Lauren Kientz Anderson - blog post on (S-USIH) U.S. Intellectual History: "Prove it on Me" New Negro women - 0 views

    • Randolph Hollingsworth
       
      From H-Women (5/3/2012) From: "Lauren Kientz Anderson" Subject: Re: bourgeois vacuity In one of my previous blog posts, I wrote about the claim that the black middle class was vacuous during the 1920s. In the comments, I was challenged to update my historiography on the politics of respectability. This gave me the chance to read Erin Chapman's excellent new work, *Prove it on Me: New Negroes, Sex, and Popular Culture in the 1920s. *Her prose is gorgeous and dense. Many of the things I was feeling instinctually, she articulates with precision." Here's Chapman's challenge to Anderson.
  • two major camps. There were those who sought to modernize and professionalize established ideologies of racial advancement, solidarity, and uplift through a New Negro progressivism.... Others.. questioned, if not the very idea of racial solidarity itself, then at least the obligation of racial allegiance and respectability, and instead touted a radical individualism and independence from all but the most personal allegiances to 'art' or 'self' or some other self-generated ideal."
  • transition between the politics of respectability and New Negro Modernism
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • After reading Chapman's introduction, I can see how much the women I study straddle that line, sometimes evoking the one and sometimes evoking the other.
  • politics of respectability
  • formation of the sex-race marketplace
  • development of an intra-racial discourse of race motherhood
  • Together, they rendered black women largely invisible, their subjectivity flat and inhuman, for the greater part of that century
Mary __

Influential Women in The Civil Rights Era - 2 views

  •  
    While looking around on the internet to try and find more about women in the civil rights era I came across this link that talks a about a book that would be a good resource for our class and possibly some group projects. Its a book about women in the Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965. I don't know if it would help but it might!
  •  
    It's definitley a book that I would look through if it is available at the library
aplatonic 3

National Federation of Republican Women - 0 views

  • The story of Republican women's clubs begins many years before women even had the right to vote.
  • Hundreds of independent Republican women’s clubs grew up around the nation in the years to come. For example, there were 140 clubs in Indiana alone by the late 1930s.
  • Programs such as NFRW’s campaign management schools, women candidate seminars, and polling schools have trained literally thousands of Republican women and men to help elect GOP candidates, and communities throughout the nation have benefited from the volunteer services of NFRW’s Caring for America and literacy programs.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Millions of American women, ages 19 to 90, have helped shape our nation through wartime and peace, through depression and prosperity, through good times and bad – all through the National Federation of Republican women.
aplatonic 3

Kentucky Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc. - 0 views

  • The Kentucky Federation of Business and Professional Women is a state federation that promotes equity for all Women in the workplace through advocacy, education and information.
  • KFBPW is a powerful network of workingwomen seeking to advance their career goals, earn higher salaries, build stronger business, achieve pay equity and equal opportunities, and establish rewarding careers.
  • As all women gain earning power and spending power, they are reshaping U.S. consumer trends.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • When you join the Kentucky Federation, you become a part of an association that is dedicated to meeting the needs unique to workingwomen!
  • Membership is open to all women and men who want to help further the Kentucky Federation’s commitment to helping women in the workplace.
aplatonic 3

Kentucky Commission on Women - Organizations - 1 views

  • This is a list of organizations for women that promote women and women's equality.
  • It's important for women to be able to network with one another and collaborate on advancing women's role in society.
  •  
    HUGE list of web links for KY Woman's Clubs
Jamsasha Pierce

Women in Kentucky - 0 views

  • On January 6th, the first day of the legislative session, Kentucky ratifies the 19th Amendment.
  • National American Woman Suffrage Association dissolves and reorganizes as League of Women Voters to operate on local, state and national levels. Kentucky Equal Rights Association becomes L.W.V.
  • Mary Elliott Flanery becomes Kentucky and the South’s first female legislator when she is elected to the House of Representatives.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Mary Breckinridge founds Frontier Nursing Service at Hyden.
  •  
    Very neat time line which includes many KY women from the years 1500s to 1999. Really neat to see that in 1970, it was the first time for a female jockey to partake in the Derby!
  •  
    I found this the other day wile I was searching around the internet. I think it helps give a big picture view of women in Kentucky and helps give perspective to the long history of women in Kentucky
aplatonic 3

Women's Institute - 0 views

  • the Women's Institute will be in a growth process that will culminate in the launch of the Women's Leadership Center (WLC) in 2012.
  • The Women's Leadership Center (WLC) will be dedicated to our bedrock belief that Women's leadership can and will change the world for the better. By training Women to lead from their own authentic vision; encouraging Women to develop both their inner spiritual strength and outward skillful action in the world; fostering a paradigm shift from control over others to partnership with others; and helping Women develop the multiple human intelligences of mind, body, heart, and spirit, the Women's Leadership Center (WLC) will help support Women in becoming important change agents for the 21st century.
  •  
    Just found this interesting. Having an urge to break from the time frame of study; I see this as where women find help and empowerment to make change and a difference.
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