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Randolph Hollingsworth

Connie Lynch - in bio of Edward Fields, founder of National States Rights Party - on Anti-Defamation League website - 0 views

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    "In addition to nominating segregationist candidates for office, the party demonstrated frequently and sparked or participated in street violence in several states. In St. Augustine, Florida, in 1964, Connie Lynch, the NSRP's "official policy speaker," told a crowd of 800, "I favor violence to preserve the white race....In 1966 Lynch and four other party leaders were convicted and sent to prison for inciting a riot in Baltimore, and killings took place in the wake of NSRP rallies in Alabama in 1965 and in Kentucky in 1968." This organization gained followers from many different kinds of right-wing activists: Klansmen, White Citizens' Councils, conspiratorial anti-Communists and George Lincoln Rockwell, founder of the American Nazi Party.
Randolph Hollingsworth

KET | Living the Story | Jennie Hopkins Wilson - 3 views

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    Powerful video about a woman who lived during the violence of segregation and how everyday activities we take for granted today took great courage then. For more information about this time period in Kentucky's history, see George C. Wright's ground-breaking book _Racial Violence in Kentucky, 1865-1940: Lynchings, Mob Rule, and "Legal Lynchings."
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    This KET video will serve as the focus for the first of the UK AASRP Race Dialogues (www.uky.edu/AS/AASRP) held in the UK Student Center on Sept 16th 4:30-6 p.m.
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    The video on jennie and Alice Wilson is a powerful example of how standing up for what you believe in is the best thing a person can do. Jennie is a strong woman because of her childhood. Seeing her parents as slaves and as free people made an impression on her. This impression made her srong enough to raise foour children in Kentucky during segregation and send all four of them to college. Alice was strong enough to integrate into mayfield high school with 9 other children at the age of fourteen when no other black students would. After integrating she dealt with vocal abuse from white classmates, but never retaliated physically or vocally in a negative manner. Alice simply continued on with the importantt things in her life, the completion of school and the hopes of continuing onward to college.
Big Bird

Dr. Mary Britton: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - Great Black Kentuckians - 1 views

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    This is the State agency website celebrating great human rights activists. This page in particular celebrates Dr. Mary Britton, a prominent woman not only in civil rights, but also medicine and anti-lynching and segregation laws. She was the first female African American physician in Lexington and was a powerful influence for the State of Kentucky. She was active in the Woman's Improvement Club.
aplatonic 3

Kentuckiana Digital Library - 6 views

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    Primary sources can be found here through a search of your topic or person, etc. by searching newspapers, pictures, journals, oral history, manuscripts, maps, books.
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    This is a great site!!!! Use this people!!!!
Randolph Hollingsworth

Sisters in the Struggle: Jennie Wilson | uknow.uky.edu calendar - 3 views

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    Short notification of the AASRP race dialogues series starting on Sept 16 - the video is online at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm. The note would have been more useful if it included the KET website information and some description of expectation of the attendees, i.e., to discuss openly and respectfully very difficult issues regarding race, gender, sexuality, segregation and Kentucky's violent past (and present).
Randolph Hollingsworth

Jennie Wilson - KHS, Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky - 2 views

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    This site hosted by the Kentucky Historical Society was created by oral historian and archivist Doug Boyd (now at the University of Kentucky) - it offers open access to the transcripts and the video clips of the original interview of Jennie Wilson. The video clips were then edited and used within the KET production, "Living the Story" - see that version at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm
Jamsasha Pierce

The Church in the Southern Black Community: Introduction - 0 views

  • Instead, women formed missionary societies to address all manner of local and international needs, from the support of job training in their communities to funding for African American missionaries to Africa. They worked on urban ills, established reading groups, and advocated for better living conditions. They also wrote for religious periodicals, promoting quite traditional ideals of Victorian womanhood, respectability, and racial uplift. Women also continued work among their less fortunate counterparts in the rural South, in what continued to be an uneasy alliance. Like male religious leaders, too, they protested the creeping effects of Jim Crow laws and the systematic violence of lynching.
charlie v

SNYC - Southern Negro Youth Congress - 0 views

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    SNYC was created in 1937 after a group of young blacks from Virginia traaveled to the National Negro Congress meeting in Chicago, Illinios in 1936. The newly created SNYC created campaignes for anti-lynching in the south and after 12 years had chapters in 10 states with 11,000 members across the United States and the south despite being watched by the FBI. They laid the groundwork for the civil rights movement in the south by getting many people incolved in the human rights movement.
aplatonic 3

Women's Clubs - 0 views

  • Women'S Clubs are voluntary organizations that were originally formed by women who had been denied access to the major institutions of America's democratic civil society.
  • Working women formed working girls' clubs and small-town women formed civic improvement associations. In bigger cities, women organized citywide and neighborhood women's clubs and women's educational and industrial unions. Ethnic, church-based, African American, and settlement house women's clubs were founded across the country.
  • Although women continued to belong to literary, social, and charitable clubs, the majority of women's clubs organized after the Civil War had specific civic and political agendas. The specific purposes of each club differed according to the type of club and its stated purpose.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Another common goal of women's clubs was to bring more social justice into American society. Thus, women's clubs worked to implement factory inspection laws, to place limits on the number of hours in the working day, to eliminate child labor, to institute the juvenile justice system, and to raise the minimum age for compulsory education. African American women's clubs fought against lynching, racial segregation, and discrimination. Catholic and Jewish women's clubs attracted women of those faiths who may not have felt comfortable in other women's clubs; these women were able to work for social justice within their organizations, which also paid special attention to the problems encountered by the particular religious group.
  • Women's club members believed that in order to accomplish most of their aims they had to organize networks of women's clubs.
  • Membership in women's clubs changed after the woman suffrage amendment greatly expanded women's access to civic activism through organizations previously closed to them.
  • The entry of women into public life has been reflected in the programs of their clubs, which show an increasing interest in questions of social welfare and international concern. Many town libraries, later supported by taxes, were started by women's clubs, and many health and welfare reforms have been initiated by them. The feminist movement also influenced women's clubs, especially by spurring the establishment of groups such as the National Organization for Women (founded 1966), which are explicitly devoted to the expansion of women's rights.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Florence Shoemaker Thompson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

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    by Yvette Balzer
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