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The Project Gutenberg eBook of Citizenship; a Manual for Voters, by Emma Guy Cromwell. - 24 views

  • Citizenship
  • civil rights
  • We must be familiar with our national and state Constitutions
  • ...69 more annotations...
  • Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting.
  • Civil rights and political rights are not the same,
    • charlie v
       
      Political rights and civil rights are not the same, but political rules and rights should not cut into a persons civil rights
  • The way to get good government is through the parties; that is one reason women must choose their party and enter into the organization of the party of their choice.
  • The United States is both a Democracy and a Republic. A Democracy is a government by the people in which the will of the people prevails throughout the country. "This is the fundamental principle of American government." A Republic is a democracy where the people elect representatives to carry on the government.
  • Constitution is the foundation upon which our government is built
  • There are now forty-eight states in the United States with forty-eight constitutions framed upon the Federal Constitution. Each state has its own constitution, which in no way conflicts with the Federal Constitution.
  • first Constitution of Kentucky was adopted April 3, 1792, at a convention that met in Danville, and later on June 1st, 1792, Kentucky was admitted into the union as a state.
  • An amendment to the Kentucky Constitution requires a three-fifths vote of the members in both houses of the legislature to pass, and then it is submitted by the General Assembly to the voters of the State, which requires a majority of the voters to be adopted.
  • There are now eighteen amendments to the Federal Constitution. The nineteenth amendment on "Suffrage" is still pending, needing only one more state to give universal suffrage to women.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Was KY the second to last to ratify the 19th ammendment? Why so long? Ties as a southern state?
  • The citizen who does not possess some knowledge of his government and its workings will become a prey to the demagogue, or of individuals who are anxious to advance their own interest at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      How does one trust a politian, even if you are involved in the current events of the day?
  • Parties are just what their constituents make them.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      I like this simple description. Now if we could keep the interpretation as simple.
  • trial by jury is composed of twelve men,
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Not yet appropriate for women?
  • As long as men and women think for themselves we shall have political parties.
  • A person with no opinion on public affairs is a coward and unpatriotic.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Very provoking! Not to mention esteem to become educated.
  • Citizenship
  • Citizenship
  • As a test of one's love
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Stron conservative woman emphasizeing patriotism.
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Copyright 1920
    • Syle Khaw
       
      This manual was created before Tennessee ratified the 19th amendment.
  • a sponger, a coward and a shirker
    • Syle Khaw
       
      Cromwell shows that being a good citizen is part of your moral core and noone would want to be accused of being lazy or bad because it's an insult.
  • Copyright 1920
  • Copyright 1920
  • have the vote and let us not only count it a privilege but a duty to do our part as citizens in establishing good
  • good government
  • government
  • government
  • government.
  • no state constitution can conflict with our Federal Constitution
  • The Federal Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of each House of Congress, and if passed must be referred to the state legislatures for ratification
  • no law will stand in our courts that is in violation of our National Constitution.
    • Syle Khaw
       
      this shows complete faith in our National Constitution
  • To be an intelligent and desirable citizen we must have a knowledge of our Constitution, and know by whom and how our country is governed. The man or woman who does not possess some knowledge of how the country is governed—as has been said—may easily become a prey of persons who are anxious to advance their own interests at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      A prevailing problem.
  • There are four ways which we, as citizens, can help maintain our government: [Pg 59]"First: Vote at every election, read and be interested in public affairs. "Second: Help to manage public affairs and be ready to hold an office, if you are the choice of the people. "Third: Try to understand public questions, so you can vote intelligently and criticize justly. "Fourth: Remember to pay your share of the expense of doing the work."
  • The voting place is the leveling place, and when women realize that the exercise of suffrage gives not only the equal right to vote, but also allows equal expression of opinion, then the better purpose of woman suffrage will have been accomplished.
  • Only white persons and negroes may become naturalized. "Chinese, Japanese and East Indians cannot become citizens unless born in the United States." Unmarried women can become citizens like the men. A married woman is a citizen if her husband is a citizen. She cannot become naturalized by herself. A woman born in the United States who marries an alien ceases to be an American citizen and becomes a subject of the country to which her husband belongs. The wife of a man not a citizen of the United States cannot vote in this country.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      One condition after another in preventing a woman form having eqality.
  • There are now over 27,011,330 voting women in the United States, soon to take part in all elections, and share the responsibility as well as the privilege of suffrage.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      It would be interesting to see statistical camparisons and voting paterns (populations) from this number to the first two decades of 2000.
  • Let the women of our country come forward and identify themselves with the party of their choice and organize under competent leaders, showing to the world we not only deem it a great privilege to vote, but are willing to share the responsibility of making our government the best in the world.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Let her no longer fear to proclaim her independence!
  • A citizen is one who has the rights and privileges of the inhabitants of the community, state and nation, and as a duty should equip himself so as to render the best citizenship possible.
    • Jamsasha Pierce
       
      As a citizen it is important to practice your political rights. Voting allows you to be an active citizen and to get your point across.
  • A state Constitution cannot interfere with the Federal Constitution, neither can the Federal Constitution interfere with the regulation of the state.
  • ecause it is only in this way that there can be a fair expression of the political sentiment of the qualified voters on any question.
  • Kentucky has one hundred and twenty counties
  • Kentucky has eleven congressional districts, therefore eleven congressmen elected by the people.
    • granestrella
       
      Referencing the Suffragists but appealing to the Maternalists as well
  • improve and protect the home, the church and the community.
  • It is the duty of every man and woman under the protection of our flag to give his or her best to the country and be willing to take upon themselves the burden as well as the privilege of government, and fully appreciate the inheritance our fathers left.
    • granestrella
       
      This is true today even though too few people will take responsibility for the actions of their country.
    • granestrella
       
      This draws the line between then and now and how far the image of the 'upstanding' citizen has come since the civil rights era.
    • granestrella
       
      This feels abandoned in modern Kentucky. We tend to operate on a county by county basis now from what I can tell.
    • granestrella
       
      Political apathy is HUGE today and a major problem among youth. It should be the job of a 'citizen' to invigorate those without an opinion.
  • composed of one man
  • The convention is opened with prayer.
    • granestrella
       
      This is almost comical. The images kind of detract from the seriousness of the matter.
    • granestrella
       
      Religion clearly shaped politics
  • The expense of our government is enormous, but the paying of taxes is one way in which all must take part.
    • granestrella
       
      I have to agree that taxation is necessary for an established government. The trouble has come with the accumulationof external   debts that the public is expected to repay.
  • Porto Rico.
    • granestrella
       
      Really? Why on Earth is it spelled this way?
  • We are not patriotic unless we respond to the call of our government.
    • granestrella
       
      In agreement with my stance on current definitions of citizenship
    • granestrella
       
      This is entirely contradictory.
    • granestrella
       
      Without a doubt, this is true today.
    • granestrella
       
      I believe all of these are still relevant except the second bullet.
  • Another reason is that the right to vote is not only a privilege but a duty that is imposed by law, and where one is entitled to exercise that privilege, the failure to so exercise it is a failure to perform a duty on the part of the voter.
    • granestrella
       
      YES! This is an idea people still don't seem to understand but the discrepancy now falls among age groups rather than gender
  • A strong appeal is made to the women voters of our nation to prepare themselves for public life
  • let us not forget that the home is the most sacred refuge of life
    • flamenco clap
       
      this refers to maternalists and suffragists, appealing to different types of women
  •  
    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
  • ...1 more comment...
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    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
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    This manual by Cromwell is not only free and open, but useful in many ways when studying or researching citizenship. Cromwell lists points in her work that cover all aspects of how to be a good citizen. She does this by referencing our constitution and laws and how we should follow them.
  •  
    "Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting."
Randolph Hollingsworth

50th Anniversary Conference: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - 1 views

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    Thursday, Oct. 14th in Louisville, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will celebrate its 50th Anniversary Civil and Human Rights Conference. John Trasviña, assistant Secretary of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity for the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, will announce the launch of a new HUD Fair Housing Innovative Education Program at Kentucky State University. The program is called The National Fair Housing Collegiate Partnership and is a practical concept designed to promote fair housing and educate students about their rights under the U.S. Fair Housing Act. This law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, color, religion, disability, sex, national origin and families with children. The HUD partnership program at Kentucky State University will also provide information for students who have interests in pursuingKentuckyrelated careers.
Jamsasha Pierce

Kentucky: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - 1960's - 1 views

  • The Kentucky General Assembly passes the KentuckyKentuckyAct and Governor Edward T. Breahitt signs it into law on January 27, 1966. The Act prohibits discrimination in employment and public accommodations based on race, national origin, color, and religion. Kentucky becomes the first state in the South pass aKentuckylaw. It becomes the first in the south to establish enforcement powers overKentuckyviolations on a state level. The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights becomes the state enforcement authority of the Act.    The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights publishes "Negro Employment in Kentucky State Agencies" in February 1966, tracking for the first time African American employment statistics of the state government workforce. On August 26, 1966, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights opens an office in Louisville, Ky., to “increase field service activities in the western half of the state, where some 70 percent of Kentucky’s Negroes live,” say state officials.
  •  
    this is very interesting info
robert michael

Eleanor Jordan/ kentucky historical society database for kentuckykentuckyoral history project - 0 views

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    Here is an excerpt from the khs catalog Eleanor Jordan Collection Name: The Civil Rights Movement in Civil Rights Interview Date: 2/3/1999 Synopsis: Jordan tells of her developing awareness of civil inequalities as a young woman and memories of segregation at Louisville amusement parks, retail stores, and movies. She also remembers people involved in the Civil Rights activity related to schools and housing. She attributes her developing black consciousness and pride to her mother and to some school teachers who introduced her to American History and Black History.
Big Bird

Kentucky Women Artists - 1 views

  •  
    A nice list of Kentucky Women artists from the beginning of theKentuckyEra through the present. If anyone should find this useful, the list comprises at least 48 diffrent female artists from Kentucky, some of whom have had experinces and involvement in theKentuckyEra and have incorporated these feelings and ideas into their artwork.
aplatonic 3

Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky - 0 views

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    Kentucky Historical Society Civil Rights Movemrnt in Kentucky Oral History Project
Randolph Hollingsworth

KY Grade School Posters on Civil Rights Contest Winners - Civil Rights Commission on Human Rights 50th Anniversary October 2010 - 0 views

  •  
    How many of these posters by our KY grade school children attributed civil rights efforts to civil rights women?
Randolph Hollingsworth

Jennie Wilson - KHS, Civil Rights Movement in Civil Rights - 2 views

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    This site hosted by the Kentucky Historical Society was created by oral historian and archivist Doug Boyd (now at the University of Kentucky) - it offers open access to the transcripts and the video clips of the original interview of Jennie Wilson. The video clips were then edited and used within the KET production, "Living the Story" - see that version at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm
Randolph Hollingsworth

Audrey Grevious Interview 1999 - full transcription as PDF - 1 views

  •  
    Betsy Brinson, Civil Rights in KY project director for KY Oral HIstory Commission, interviewed Audrey Grevious of Lexington at her home in Fayette County, April 13, 1999. A powerful storyteller and great educator, Grevious is generous in her oral history interview though she tries to downplay the fact that she played a major role in the local Civil Rights movement here in central Civil Rights . From KHS catalog "Audrey Grevious speaks of her early education in Black schools which led her to become a teacher. She also became an activist, and, as President of the Lexington NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) together with Julia Lewis, President of Lexington CORE (Congress on Racial Equality) led a movement to challenge segregation in employment, and public accommodations. She notes the involvement of maids and non-profession people and the scarcity of ministers, with the exception of Rev. W.A. Jones, Historic Pleasant Green Baptist Church. When school integration came to Lexington, she tells how the Black students and teachers lost out."
Randolph Hollingsworth

Crowd of nearly 10,000 gathered at civil rights event in Lexington in 1867 | Neighbors | civil rights .com - 0 views

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    Tom Law, project director of the Kentucky Archaeology & Heritage Series, said he uncovered these details while doing research for Davis Bottom: Rare History, Valuable Lives, the sixth episode in the Kentucky Archaeology & Heritage documentary series, which premiered last fall.
Big Bird

Dr. Mary Britton: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - Great Black Kentuckians - 1 views

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    This is the State agency website celebrating great human rights activists. This page in particular celebrates Dr. Mary Britton, a prominent woman not only in civil rights, but also medicine and anti-lynching and segregation laws. She was the first female African American physician in Lexington and was a powerful influence for the State of Kentucky. She was active in the Woman's Improvement Club.
Claire Johns

KET | Living the Story | Civil Rights Timeline - 0 views

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    Time of the civil rights movement in civil rights
Claire Johns

Kentucky: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - Hall of Fame 2001 - 0 views

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    From here you can find many people who have been inducted into the Kentucky Hall of Fame. This is Dr. Marlatt, who helped start the Lexington chapter of CORE. 
tiger lily

Laura Clay - 3 views

  • Lexington's Sayre School
  • an unusually powerful position for a southern girl in the 1860's when any woman demonstrating intellect was considered a "bluestocking" doomed to spinsterhood.
  • Their resulting divorce in 1878 was the turning point in all of the Clay women's lives. According to laws at the time, a woman held no claim to house or property
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • the Clay women turned to the equalizing of women's rights.
  • Laura decided to lease White Hall from her father
  • She then collaborated with Susan B. Anthony to organize suffrage societies across the Commonwealth
  • During this same period, Clay became the best-known southern suffragist and the South's leading voice in the councils of the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA). While chair of the association's membership committee, she introduced recruiting innovations that almost tripled the number of members, from 17,000 in 1905 to 45,501 in 1907, and succeeded in establishing associations in nine southern states.
  • Clay was an emancipationist; one who believed that it was up to each state to grant freedom/rights to citizens
  • Clay was also a believer in Anglo-Saxon superiority but was paternalistic in her attitudes. A product of her time and region, this hearkening back to Southern pre-Civil War beliefs caused some critics to castigate her as a racist.
  • She also worked to promote the involvement of women in politics, advocating that women not silently accept the party affiliation of their husbands, but instead form and act upon their own beliefs.
  •  
    The beginning of this article is a great biography. The best part of this piece was being able to find out more about her positions on states rights and whether she believed in civil rights for blacks as well. Clay was a major supporter of states rights. In all that she did for women's rights ( a list is given at the end) Clay was not an advocate for the rights of African Americans. 
  •  
    I found it unique that Laura Clay began to pursue womens equal rights after her parents seperated. Her mother took care of the White Hall estate for 45 years and then was all the sudden homeless because the property belonged to the father according to the laws that prevented women from owning land. This left Laura and her sisters to pursue the equality of women. She was also responsible for creating the Kentucky Equal Rights Organization with the help of Susan B. Anthony.
  •  
    This site has a short but very informative biography of Laura Clay. Along with a biography it list all of her monumental accomplishment fighting for equal rights. The site is full of pictures of Laura Clay and is very well documented with numerous sources citing the information.
Randolph Hollingsworth

2011 Berkshire Conference on the History of Women Digital History Laboratory - 0 views

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    I would like to submit all of your names as original authors of the History of Kentucky Women in theKentuckyEra community outreach and open knowledge initiative (http://www.kywcrh.org) - please let me know if you do not wish your name to be included as a founding author. Here's the call: "If you are involved in a women's history website or web exhibit, online oral history initiative, podcast, blog, or other type of digital project and would like it featured in the Lab, please contact Kate Freedman (kfreedma@history.umass.edu). The submissions for the Digital History Lab should include the following (please submit your proposal in PDF format) : - A 300-words abstract describing the project - A brief 1 page CV containing your name, affiliation, contact information - A list of the requirements in order for your project to be viewed (these include but are not limited to OS, Applications, additional equipment) Kate Freedman Department of History University of Massachusetts kfreedma@history.umass.edu Email: kfreedma@history.umass.edu Visit the website at http://blogs.umass.edu/berks/cfp/"
Randolph Hollingsworth

Kentucky Women - Search Results - TheKentuckyHistory Project: Survey of Collections and Repositories (The American Folklife Center, Library of Congress) - 1 views

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    inc. WKU, UofL, KHS, Sisters of Charity of Nazarth Archival Center, Lindsey Wilson, as well as several collections at UK
charlie v

KentuckyKentuckyHall of Fame - 1 views

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    This website shows information on people who went to extreme links to spread their ideas of gender fairness and civil rights activism
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    This site seems very useful for anyone who is conducting research on any of the people listed here. Many seem to be still living and this could be used as a primary resource if you can contact them and set up an interview.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Kentucky Newspaper Regrets Neglect ofKentuckyMovement - UCLA Center for Communications and Community - 0 views

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    July 4, 2004 By Linda Blackford & Linda Minch, Herald-Leader Highlighting decisions by Fred Wachs and Bill Hanna on whether or not to cover the CRM in the Lexington Herald and the Lexington Leader
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