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Jamsasha Pierce

Lillian South Bio - 1 views

  • Dr Lillian Herald South   Born:  January 31, 1879 Died:  September 13, 1966  A native of Warren County, KY, Lillian South exerted a powerful influence on Kentucky’s public health. She was born the daughter of a doctor, JF South and his wife Martha (nee Moore).  Lillian went to public school in Bowling Green and graduated with a BA degree from Potter College (at the present location of WKU) when she was only 18 years old.  She then traveled to Patterson, NJ, where she studied for two years for her RN degree in nursing. Having “aced” every course in nursing school, she decided to pursue a doctoral degree in medicine. After 5 years, she earned her MD degree  from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (1904). She returned to practice in Bowling Green, joining the successful practice of Dr J N McCormack and Dr A T McCormack. Two years later the three doctors established St Joseph Hospital in the South family home on (what is now) 12th Avenue. The home was re-built to accommodate 42 beds.  Just a few years later, in 1910, Dr South was appointed as state bacteriologist at the State Board of Health in Louisville, a position that she held for 40 years. In this capacity, she gained national recognition for her many years of research on hookworms, rabies, and leprosy in Kentucky. She is credited for virtually eradicating the once widely prevalent hookworm from the state, through public health campaigns to exterminate houseflies which are the vector. She also led the movement to ban the use of the public drinking cup.  Dr South was also very active in state and national organizations, and was the first woman to be elected vice president of the AMA (1914). She was an active member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Kentucky Medical Association, the Jefferson County Medical Society, and the Tri-County Medical Society.     [Note: the Warren County Medical Society was formerly called the Tri-County Medical Society].  She was president of the Association of Southern Medical Women, and councilor of the American Association of Medical Women.  Dr South traveled extensively to learn as much as she could about the science of medicine. She studied at Johns Hopkins, Mayo Clinic, the Pasteur Lab in Paris, as well as the Madame Curie Radium Institute. She was a delegate to the International Hygiene Congress in Dresden, Germany, and to the Public Health Division of the League of Nations in Geneva, Switz.
Jamsasha Pierce

Blackboard Learn - 0 views

  • Clarke, Anna Mac (1919-1944) - Led the protest to desegregate the Douglas Army Airfield theater.
Claire Johns

Search - 0 views

  • [1964-01-12][NEWSPAPERS. HERALD-LEADER.] [Herald-Leader. p. 9 col. 1-7]717629 "Colored Notes and Obituaries"Readers of the "Colored Notes" columns of The Lexington Herald, The Lexington Leader and Sunday Herald-Leader have voted in a readership poll for continued publication of the feature in the Lexington newspapers. … A letter distributed to readers at the time of the ballot stated that CORE and some all-white reform groups had applied considerable pressure in an effort to remove the Colored Notes from the Lexington newspapers.
  • e all-white reform group
  • me all-white reform groups
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  • [1989-11-27][HUGHES, DWIGHT] [Herald-Leader. D-8 col. 1-4 and D-11]589021 "Dwight Hughes"Since boyhood, Dwight Hughes planned to follow his father into the family business, and he has fulfilled this ambition. For the last eight years, he has been a mortician. Most would consider this business grim and unpleasant. But Hughes, co-owner of O.L. Hughes and Sons Mortuary at 322 East Third Street, says he loves it.
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    Using the search terms Urban Renewal Development Plan, I got over 30,000 hits with references back the 18th century! wow! So, then I added in the dates 1964-01-01 to 1967-01-01 and got 34 hits... now that's more like it!
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    An interesting article concerning whether to keep the "Colored Notes" section in Lexington's papers written in 1964. 
Randolph Hollingsworth

KY native, Sophonisba Breckinridge, focus for Newberry Seminar on Women and Gender, Chicago, 11-12-2010 - 1 views

  • November 12, 2010 Reform and Immigration in Chicago: Hull-House Alumnae in Action The Professor and the Prostitute: Sophonisba Breckinridge and the Morals Court in Depression-Era Chicago Anya Jabour, University of Montana In 1930, Sophonisba Breckinridge, Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, launched a campaign to investigate and reform legal procedures in the Morals Court, a specialized municipal court established to deal with accused prostitutes. Hailed as a model progressive reform at the time of its inception in 1913, by 1930 the Morals Court was plagued by routine violations of due process as well as charges of police corruption and institutionalized racism. Breckinridge1s campaign to secure civil rights for accused prostitutes offers a new perspective on the politics of prostitution and on feminist activism in the interwar period. Hilda Satt Polacheck (1882-1967): Worker, Writer, ‘Hull House Girl'Bridget K. O'Rourke, Elmhurst College Commentator: Rima Lunin Schultz, Independent Scholar
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    If you are planning to be in Chicago on November 12th, register for this terrific seminar on Sophonisba Breckinridge. Anya Jabour, an excellent historian, will be presenting a paper for discussion about a campaign by this innovative professor to reform the way the police and the court treated women of color.
Randolph Hollingsworth

UC TV video of Angela Davis on US prisons and the 21st century abolitionist movement - 0 views

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    Former UC Santa Cruz prof and presidential candidate, Angela Y Davis in a video in 2008 discussing the trend toward jailing members of poor communities with mostly people of color. Her research today focuses on race, gender and imprisonment. This is an important topic for Kentucky as we listen to the Children's Law Center who is looking at why we have such high incarceration rates for our schoolchildren of color.
aplatonic 3

Women's Clubs - 0 views

  • Women'S Clubs are voluntary organizations that were originally formed by women who had been denied access to the major institutions of America's democratic civil society.
  • Working women formed working girls' clubs and small-town women formed civic improvement associations. In bigger cities, women organized citywide and neighborhood women's clubs and women's educational and industrial unions. Ethnic, church-based, African American, and settlement house women's clubs were founded across the country.
  • Although women continued to belong to literary, social, and charitable clubs, the majority of women's clubs organized after the Civil War had specific civic and political agendas. The specific purposes of each club differed according to the type of club and its stated purpose.
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  • Another common goal of women's clubs was to bring more social justice into American society. Thus, women's clubs worked to implement factory inspection laws, to place limits on the number of hours in the working day, to eliminate child labor, to institute the juvenile justice system, and to raise the minimum age for compulsory education. African American women's clubs fought against lynching, racial segregation, and discrimination. Catholic and Jewish women's clubs attracted women of those faiths who may not have felt comfortable in other women's clubs; these women were able to work for social justice within their organizations, which also paid special attention to the problems encountered by the particular religious group.
  • Women's club members believed that in order to accomplish most of their aims they had to organize networks of women's clubs.
  • Membership in women's clubs changed after the woman suffrage amendment greatly expanded women's access to civic activism through organizations previously closed to them.
  • The entry of women into public life has been reflected in the programs of their clubs, which show an increasing interest in questions of social welfare and international concern. Many town libraries, later supported by taxes, were started by women's clubs, and many health and welfare reforms have been initiated by them. The feminist movement also influenced women's clubs, especially by spurring the establishment of groups such as the National Organization for Women (founded 1966), which are explicitly devoted to the expansion of women's rights.
Randolph Hollingsworth

The Project Gutenberg eBook of The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume IV, by Susan B. Anthony and Ida Husted Harper. - 0 views

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    Kentucky report by Laura Clay does not include anything about the Covington Colored Organization mentioned by Eugenia Farmer in 1894 convention of KERA. Also no mention of Farmer speaking on school suffrage at the Colored Methodist Church of Covington
Claire Johns

Notable Kentucky African Americans - Colored Notes in Kentucky Newspapers - 0 views

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    Colored Notes (Kentucky) 
Randolph Hollingsworth

Audrey Grevious Interview 1999 - full transcription as PDF - 1 views

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    Betsy Brinson, Civil Rights in KY project director for KY Oral HIstory Commission, interviewed Audrey Grevious of Lexington at her home in Fayette County, April 13, 1999. A powerful storyteller and great educator, Grevious is generous in her oral history interview though she tries to downplay the fact that she played a major role in the local civil rights movement here in central Kentucky. From KHS catalog "Audrey Grevious speaks of her early education in Black schools which led her to become a teacher. She also became an activist, and, as President of the Lexington NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) together with Julia Lewis, President of Lexington CORE (Congress on Racial Equality) led a movement to challenge segregation in employment, and public accommodations. She notes the involvement of maids and non-profession people and the scarcity of ministers, with the exception of Rev. W.A. Jones, Historic Pleasant Green Baptist Church. When school integration came to Lexington, she tells how the Black students and teachers lost out."
Randolph Hollingsworth

50th Anniversary Conference: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - 1 views

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    Thursday, Oct. 14th in Louisville, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will celebrate its 50th Anniversary Civil and Human Rights Conference. John Trasviña, assistant Secretary of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity for the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, will announce the launch of a new HUD Fair Housing Innovative Education Program at Kentucky State University. The program is called The National Fair Housing Collegiate Partnership and is a practical concept designed to promote fair housing and educate students about their rights under the U.S. Fair Housing Act. This law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, color, religion, disability, sex, national origin and families with children. The HUD partnership program at Kentucky State University will also provide information for students who have interests in pursuing civil rights related careers.
aplatonic 3

Image Collections - 2 views

shared by aplatonic 3 on 13 Oct 10 - No Cached
  • ap view all images from this collection Thirty-one African American girls who passed swim tests with swimming school staff. Front Row, Emily Coleman, Mary L. Taylor, Julia Mukes, Ella F. Moss, Nannie Covington, Virginia Williams, Costella Peck, Dolersa Hobbs, Lena Walker, Alva Patton, Annie Lacefield, Geraldine Moore, Dora Madison, Nena Curry. Second Row, Annette Brown, Rominti Wade, Anna Thacker, Geraldine Penman, Ann Roach, Nannette Johnson, Shirley Wright, Mary Williams, Louise Henderson, Vada Lawson, Geraldine Garner, Mattie B. Ray, Mary J. Butler, Margaret Floyd, Dorsey Williams, Pauline Fender, Anna B. Bailey. Back row, Osborne Price, lifeguard; Margaret Covington, leader; A.D. Burroughs, pool manager; Mrs. H.H. Rowe, director of city recreation and Douglas park; George Elliott, Herald-Leader instructor; Russell Hill, assistant instructor; Juanita Rankin, leader; and Kenneth Dunson, lifeguard. (This image was published in: Herald-Leader )
Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc.com - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
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  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
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    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
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    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
Randolph Hollingsworth

Pictorial Directory of the Kentucky Association of Colored Women [1945] - 0 views

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    This directory was compiled and edited by Lucy Harth Smith - see Measha's research journal entry on her at http://www.kywcrh.org/archives/650 - it would be FANTASTIC if we could get some of these women's pictures used on the KYwCRh.org website! Anyone want to work with Reinette to pick out which pictures need to be digitized?!
aplatonic 3

The Kentucky club woman / Kentucky Association of Colored Women's Clubs - 0 views

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    Info Kat
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    A potential resource
aplatonic 3

Fouse family papers, 1914-1951. - 0 views

  • These are the papers of W.H. and Lizzie B. Fouse, black civic leaders in Lexington, Ky., in the first half of the twentieth century. The collection includes expense ledgers containing records of Dunbar High School, correspondence relating to the Kentucky Negro Education Association and the Kentucky and National Associations of Colored Women, a scrapbook with clippings about racial issues, and personal materials. Much of the personal materials consist of letters of sympathy sent after the death of Lizzie B. Fouse's mother died in 1939. Other materials relate to the YWCA and to the WCTU. There are also miscellaneous photographs, including several of Mrs. Fouse.
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    World Cat search
aplatonic 3

Mary McLeod Bethune with a ... - World Digital Library - 0 views

  • une was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader. Born Mary Jane McLeod on July 10, 1875, in Mayesville, South Carolina, the daughter of former slaves, Bethune won scholarships to attend Scotia Seminary in Concord, North Carolina (now Barber-Scotia College), and the Institute for Home and Foreign Missions in Chicago (now the Moody Bible Institute). In 1904, she moved to Daytona Beach, Florida, to found her own school. Her one-room school house became the Daytona Normal and Industrial School for Negro Girls before merging with Cookman Institute for Boys in 1923. The merged school later affiliated with the United Methodist Church and became the historically-black college named in her honor, Bethune-Cookman College (now Bethune-Cookman University). In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency. She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955. Date Created Around 1905 Place North America > United States of America > Florida > Daytona Beach Time 1900 AD - 1949 AD Topic Social sciences > Political science > Civil & political rights Social sciences > Education > Schools & their activities; special education Additional Subjects African American girls ; African Americans--Segregation ; Bethune, Mary McLeod, 1875-1955 ; Women ; Women's history Type of Item Prints, Photographs Physical Description 1 negative: black and white; 4 x 5 inches Institution State Library and Archives of Florida External Resource http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.wdl/ftasa.4013
  • Mary McLeod Bethune was a pioneering American educator and civil rights leader.
  • In 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt appointed Bethune the director of the National Youth Administration's Division of Negro Affairs, making her the first black woman to head a federal agency.
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  • She also founded the National Council of Negro Women and was an active member of the National Association of Colored Women until her death in May 1955.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Helen Caise Wade - Woman who broke color barrier visits Rosa Parks Elementary School - 0 views

  • Wade was the first African-American to attend a white public school in Fayette County when she took a summer school class at Lafayette High School in 1955.
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    Jennifer Jones, a teacher at Rosa Parks Elementary school in Lexington, invited Helen Caise Wade to speak with her students about integrating an all-white school in Lexington in 1955.
aplatonic 3

She broke a race barrier | Education | Kentucky.com - 0 views

  • described her experiences as the first black student to ever attend a white school in Lexington, and the price her family paid for helping to break the color barrier in 1955.
  • Helen Caise Wade
tiger lily

Oral HIstory - 1 views

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    The Kentucky Historical Society has put together on this site the Oral History Project. They have recorded and transcribes stories from the Civil Rights Movement. They are all Kentuckians and is an excelling primary source regarding various topics that the interviewees discuss. I listen to Howard Bailey talk of what it was like to move from segregated color school to integrated school.
Wes _

Voices from the Gaps: University of Minnesota - 2 views

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    This resource is devoted to "Women Writers and Artist of color". This is similar to what our class is doing just with a wider national scope.
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    The various and different works that are provided from the website are both enlightening and interesting. The fact that a database now exists with such a wide variety of published material from women of all races and backgrounds in one place is cool to know about and explore.
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