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robert michael

Rosa Parks: The woman who changed a nation - 0 views

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    This article on Rosa Parks was conducted in 1996, many years after her role in the civil rights movement. She talks about her role in the movement and the Montgomery bus boycott in 1955. She also reflects on the changes in our country since that period in time. Mrs. Parks still believes that many things are still in need of change to become the great country that the United States could one day be. She says that more young children need to be exposed to what the civil rights movement was like. I chose to write about this article because Mrs. Parks had such a big influence in the civil rights movement and started the Montgomery bus boycott. December first is also the 55th anniversary of when Mrs. Parks refused to get out of her seat and started a revolution of organized resistance in the civil rights movement. What she did led to many other things such as, sit-ins, marches, and her action opened the civil rights movement up for more people to be a part of it. My opinion of this article is that it shows that there was more to the story of Rosa Parks than just a tired woman not willing to give up her seat on a bus. I found this article educational and inspiring, and it also shed a new light on the civil rights movement for me.
flamenco clap

The Project Gutenberg eBook of Citizenship; a Manual for Voters, by Emma Guy Cromwell. - 24 views

  • Citizenship
  • civil rights
  • We must be familiar with our national and state Constitutions
  • ...69 more annotations...
  • Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting.
  • Civil rights and political rights are not the same,
    • charlie v
       
      Political rights and civil rights are not the same, but political rules and rights should not cut into a persons civil rights
  • The way to get good government is through the parties; that is one reason women must choose their party and enter into the organization of the party of their choice.
  • The United States is both a Democracy and a Republic. A Democracy is a government by the people in which the will of the people prevails throughout the country. "This is the fundamental principle of American government." A Republic is a democracy where the people elect representatives to carry on the government.
  • Constitution is the foundation upon which our government is built
  • There are now forty-eight states in the United States with forty-eight constitutions framed upon the Federal Constitution. Each state has its own constitution, which in no way conflicts with the Federal Constitution.
  • first Constitution of Kentucky was adopted April 3, 1792, at a convention that met in Danville, and later on June 1st, 1792, Kentucky was admitted into the union as a state.
  • An amendment to the Kentucky Constitution requires a three-fifths vote of the members in both houses of the legislature to pass, and then it is submitted by the General Assembly to the voters of the State, which requires a majority of the voters to be adopted.
  • There are now eighteen amendments to the Federal Constitution. The nineteenth amendment on "Suffrage" is still pending, needing only one more state to give universal suffrage to women.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Was KY the second to last to ratify the 19th ammendment? Why so long? Ties as a southern state?
  • The citizen who does not possess some knowledge of his government and its workings will become a prey to the demagogue, or of individuals who are anxious to advance their own interest at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      How does one trust a politian, even if you are involved in the current events of the day?
  • Parties are just what their constituents make them.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      I like this simple description. Now if we could keep the interpretation as simple.
  • trial by jury is composed of twelve men,
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Not yet appropriate for women?
  • As long as men and women think for themselves we shall have political parties.
  • A person with no opinion on public affairs is a coward and unpatriotic.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Very provoking! Not to mention esteem to become educated.
  • Citizenship
  • Citizenship
  • As a test of one's love
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Stron conservative woman emphasizeing patriotism.
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Emma Guy Cromwell
  • Copyright 1920
    • Syle Khaw
       
      This manual was created before Tennessee ratified the 19th amendment.
  • a sponger, a coward and a shirker
    • Syle Khaw
       
      Cromwell shows that being a good citizen is part of your moral core and noone would want to be accused of being lazy or bad because it's an insult.
  • Copyright 1920
  • Copyright 1920
  • have the vote and let us not only count it a privilege but a duty to do our part as citizens in establishing good
  • good government
  • government
  • government
  • government.
  • no state constitution can conflict with our Federal Constitution
  • The Federal Constitution may be amended by two-thirds vote of each House of Congress, and if passed must be referred to the state legislatures for ratification
  • no law will stand in our courts that is in violation of our National Constitution.
    • Syle Khaw
       
      this shows complete faith in our National Constitution
  • To be an intelligent and desirable citizen we must have a knowledge of our Constitution, and know by whom and how our country is governed. The man or woman who does not possess some knowledge of how the country is governed—as has been said—may easily become a prey of persons who are anxious to advance their own interests at the expense of the people.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      A prevailing problem.
  • There are four ways which we, as citizens, can help maintain our government: [Pg 59]"First: Vote at every election, read and be interested in public affairs. "Second: Help to manage public affairs and be ready to hold an office, if you are the choice of the people. "Third: Try to understand public questions, so you can vote intelligently and criticize justly. "Fourth: Remember to pay your share of the expense of doing the work."
  • The voting place is the leveling place, and when women realize that the exercise of suffrage gives not only the equal right to vote, but also allows equal expression of opinion, then the better purpose of woman suffrage will have been accomplished.
  • Only white persons and negroes may become naturalized. "Chinese, Japanese and East Indians cannot become citizens unless born in the United States." Unmarried women can become citizens like the men. A married woman is a citizen if her husband is a citizen. She cannot become naturalized by herself. A woman born in the United States who marries an alien ceases to be an American citizen and becomes a subject of the country to which her husband belongs. The wife of a man not a citizen of the United States cannot vote in this country.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      One condition after another in preventing a woman form having eqality.
  • There are now over 27,011,330 voting women in the United States, soon to take part in all elections, and share the responsibility as well as the privilege of suffrage.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      It would be interesting to see statistical camparisons and voting paterns (populations) from this number to the first two decades of 2000.
  • Let the women of our country come forward and identify themselves with the party of their choice and organize under competent leaders, showing to the world we not only deem it a great privilege to vote, but are willing to share the responsibility of making our government the best in the world.
    • aplatonic 3
       
      Let her no longer fear to proclaim her independence!
  • A citizen is one who has the rights and privileges of the inhabitants of the community, state and nation, and as a duty should equip himself so as to render the best citizenship possible.
    • Jamsasha Pierce
       
      As a citizen it is important to practice your political rights. Voting allows you to be an active citizen and to get your point across.
  • A state Constitution cannot interfere with the Federal Constitution, neither can the Federal Constitution interfere with the regulation of the state.
  • ecause it is only in this way that there can be a fair expression of the political sentiment of the qualified voters on any question.
  • Kentucky has one hundred and twenty counties
  • Kentucky has eleven congressional districts, therefore eleven congressmen elected by the people.
    • granestrella
       
      Referencing the Suffragists but appealing to the Maternalists as well
  • improve and protect the home, the church and the community.
  • It is the duty of every man and woman under the protection of our flag to give his or her best to the country and be willing to take upon themselves the burden as well as the privilege of government, and fully appreciate the inheritance our fathers left.
    • granestrella
       
      This is true today even though too few people will take responsibility for the actions of their country.
    • granestrella
       
      This draws the line between then and now and how far the image of the 'upstanding' citizen has come since the civil rights era.
    • granestrella
       
      This feels abandoned in modern Kentucky. We tend to operate on a county by county basis now from what I can tell.
    • granestrella
       
      Political apathy is HUGE today and a major problem among youth. It should be the job of a 'citizen' to invigorate those without an opinion.
  • composed of one man
  • The convention is opened with prayer.
    • granestrella
       
      This is almost comical. The images kind of detract from the seriousness of the matter.
    • granestrella
       
      Religion clearly shaped politics
  • The expense of our government is enormous, but the paying of taxes is one way in which all must take part.
    • granestrella
       
      I have to agree that taxation is necessary for an established government. The trouble has come with the accumulationof external   debts that the public is expected to repay.
  • Porto Rico.
    • granestrella
       
      Really? Why on Earth is it spelled this way?
  • We are not patriotic unless we respond to the call of our government.
    • granestrella
       
      In agreement with my stance on current definitions of citizenship
    • granestrella
       
      This is entirely contradictory.
    • granestrella
       
      Without a doubt, this is true today.
    • granestrella
       
      I believe all of these are still relevant except the second bullet.
  • Another reason is that the right to vote is not only a privilege but a duty that is imposed by law, and where one is entitled to exercise that privilege, the failure to so exercise it is a failure to perform a duty on the part of the voter.
    • granestrella
       
      YES! This is an idea people still don't seem to understand but the discrepancy now falls among age groups rather than gender
  • A strong appeal is made to the women voters of our nation to prepare themselves for public life
  • let us not forget that the home is the most sacred refuge of life
    • flamenco clap
       
      this refers to maternalists and suffragists, appealing to different types of women
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    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
  • ...1 more comment...
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    A Kentucky woman politician, the first state librarian, and first woman to be appointed to a statewide public office in Kentucky - takes it upon herself to write a how-to manual ... just like all the cookbooks and how to get an education and other womanly things that a New Woman in the 1920s should educate themselves about.
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    This manual by Cromwell is not only free and open, but useful in many ways when studying or researching citizenship. Cromwell lists points in her work that cover all aspects of how to be a good citizen. She does this by referencing our constitution and laws and how we should follow them.
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    "Citizenship not only embraces civil rights, but political rights which is the right of suffrage or voting."
Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc.com - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
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    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
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    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
robert michael

Eleanor Jordan/ kentucky historical society database for kentucky civil rights oral history project - 0 views

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    Here is an excerpt from the khs catalog Eleanor Jordan Collection Name: The Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky Interview Date: 2/3/1999 Synopsis: Jordan tells of her developing awareness of civil inequalities as a young woman and memories of segregation at Louisville amusement parks, retail stores, and movies. She also remembers people involved in the Civil Rights activity related to schools and housing. She attributes her developing black consciousness and pride to her mother and to some school teachers who introduced her to American History and Black History.
Jamsasha Pierce

feminism :: The second wave of feminism -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia - 1 views

  • The second wave of feminism <script src="http://adserver.adtechus.com/addyn/3.0/5308.1/1371336/0/170/ADTECH;target=_blank;grp=550;key=false;kvqsegs=D:T:2886:1362:1359:1357:1346:1341;kvtopicid=724633;kvchannel=HISTORY;misc=1291082559495"></script> The women’s movement of the 1960s and ’70s, the so-called “second wave” of feminism, represented a seemingly abrupt break with the tranquil suburban life pictured in American popular culture. Yet the roots of the new rebellion were buried in the frustrations of college-educated mothers whose discontent impelled their daughters in a new direction. If first-wave feminists were inspired by the abolition movement, their great-granddaughters were swept into feminism by the civil rights movement, the attendant discussion of principles such as equality and justice, and the revolutionary ferment caused by protests against the Vietnam War. Women’s concerns were on Pres. John F. Kennedy’s agenda even before this public discussion began. In 1961 he created the President’s Commission on the Status of Women and<script src="http://adserver.adtechus.com/addyn/3.0/5308.1/1388674/0/170/ADTECH;target=_blank;grp=550;key=false;kvqsegs=D:T:2886:1362:1359:1357:1346:1341;kvtopicid=724633;kvchannel=HISTORY;misc=1291082559533"></script> appointed Eleanor Roosevelt to lead it. Its report, issued in 1963, firmly supported the nuclear family and preparing women for motherhood. But it also documented a national pattern of employment discrimination, unequal pay, legal inequality, and meagre support services for working women that needed to be corrected through legislative guarantees of equal pay for equal work, equal job opportunities, and expanded child-care services. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 offered the first guarantee, and the civil rights Act of 1964 was amended to bar employers from discriminating on the basis of sex. Some deemed these measures insufficient in a country where classified advertisements still segregated job openings by sex, where state laws restricted women’s access to contraception, and where incidences of rape and domestic violence remained undisclosed. In the late 1960s, then, the notion of a women’s rights movement took root at the same time as the civil rights movement, and women of all ages and circumstances were swept up in debates about gender, discrimination, and the nature of equality.
robert michael

Diane Nash was on front line of Civil Rights Movement - 1 views

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    This article on Diane Nash was written about Nash receiving the Freedom Award from the National Civil Rights Museum. Nash became the leader of the movement in Nashville and helped organize the sit-ins in Nashville. She was a part of SNCC, SCLC, and the freedom rides. Doctor King even said that Nashville had the best nonviolent movement in the nation. The museum president Beverly Robertson said that women were usually the wives of leaders, but Nash was a leader by herself. I chose to write about this article because Nash was such an influential person in the Civil Rights movement and helped to open new doors up to many people. She also served as an inspiration for other women that were involved in the movement. Through her hard work and many of her actions during the Civil Rights movement I believe that Nash was very deserving of this award that was presented to her.
Randolph Hollingsworth

50th Anniversary Conference: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - 1 views

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    Thursday, Oct. 14th in Louisville, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will celebrate its 50th Anniversary Civil and Human Rights Conference. John Trasviña, assistant Secretary of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity for the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, will announce the launch of a new HUD Fair Housing Innovative Education Program at Kentucky State University. The program is called The National Fair Housing Collegiate Partnership and is a practical concept designed to promote fair housing and educate students about their rights under the U.S. Fair Housing Act. This law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, color, religion, disability, sex, national origin and families with children. The HUD partnership program at Kentucky State University will also provide information for students who have interests in pursuing civil rights related careers.
Mary __

Influential Women in The Civil Rights Era - 2 views

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    While looking around on the internet to try and find more about women in the civil rights era I came across this link that talks a about a book that would be a good resource for our class and possibly some group projects. Its a book about Women in the civil rights Movement from 1954-1965. I don't know if it would help but it might!
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    It's definitley a book that I would look through if it is available at the library
Jamsasha Pierce

The role of the black church in the Civil Rights movement - by Can Tran - Helium - 1 views

  • During the African-American Civil Rights Movement, it was the black churches that held the leadership role. Black churches were the main points of operations in regards to the Civil Rights Movement.
Margaret Sites

Blacks in Lexington Oral History Project, 1900-1989 - 2 views

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    The M.I. King Library has already preserved some oral histories pertaining to Lexington's black churches during the civil rights movement: Harry Sykes: "Sykes recalls church involvement in the civil rights marches in Lexington and discusses his chairmanship of the Commission on Religion and Human Rights in the early 1960s." Robert Jefferson: "He details the role of the African American church in the community and during the civil rights movement of the 1960s, and discusses his rejection of the non-violent faction of the movement." Albert Lee: "Reverend Lee discusses the role of the church in the African American community and the effects of segregation in Lexington." etc. There are tons of relevant interviews to be explored, most conducted with reverends. I only see ONE interview conducted with a woman about churches and the civil rights movement, perhaps a hole we could fill?
Big Bird

Kentucky Women Artists - 1 views

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    A nice list of Kentucky Women artists from the beginning of the Civil Rights Era through the present. If anyone should find this useful, the list comprises at least 48 diffrent female artists from Kentucky, some of whom have had experinces and involvement in the Civil Rights Era and have incorporated these feelings and ideas into their artwork.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Audrey Grevious Interview 1999 - full transcription as PDF - 1 views

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    Betsy Brinson, Civil Rights in KY project director for KY Oral HIstory Commission, interviewed Audrey Grevious of Lexington at her home in Fayette County, April 13, 1999. A powerful storyteller and great educator, Grevious is generous in her oral history interview though she tries to downplay the fact that she played a major role in the local Civil Rights movement here in central Kentucky. From KHS catalog "Audrey Grevious speaks of her early education in Black schools which led her to become a teacher. She also became an activist, and, as President of the Lexington NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) together with Julia Lewis, President of Lexington CORE (Congress on Racial Equality) led a movement to challenge segregation in employment, and public accommodations. She notes the involvement of maids and non-profession people and the scarcity of ministers, with the exception of Rev. W.A. Jones, Historic Pleasant Green Baptist Church. When school integration came to Lexington, she tells how the Black students and teachers lost out."
Randolph Hollingsworth

Book Review of Gregg L. Michel's Struggle for a Better South: The Southern Student Organizing Committee, 1964-1969 - 0 views

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    This UW prof summarizes this history book that shows the importance of SSOC in educating Southern white students about civil rights - when most civil rights histories have focused on the roles of Southern blacks or Northern whites.
Randolph Hollingsworth

KY Grade School Posters on Civil Rights Contest Winners - Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 50th Anniversary October 2010 - 0 views

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    How many of these posters by our KY grade school children attributed civil rights efforts to Kentucky women?
Claire Johns

The My Hero Project - Women Had Key Roles in Civil Rights EraWomen_CivilRights_AP - 3 views

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    Another great article explaining the behind the scenes roles of black women in the civil rights movement. Also, this includes some of the more famous of these women. 
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    ``After the bus boycott got going and (Martin Luther) King got involved, they wouldn't even let Rosa Parks speak at the first mass meeting,'' she said. ``She asked to speak, and one of the ministers said he thought she had done enough.'' That is so insanely demeaning! I wonder who in the movement was propagating that repression of women's voices, MLK himself seemed very willing to engage women, at least in the Anne Braden reading. Great article, i agree.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Greensboro Sit-Ins: Launch of a Civil Rights Movement : Timeline - 0 views

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    A general timeline with big milestones indicated building up to the Greensboro public accommodations protests. The International Civil Rights Center & Museum opened last February on the 50th anniversary of the day the N.C. A&T freshmen refused to leave the whites-only lunch counter -- helping to inspire a national sit-in movement. More information about the museum is online at www.sitinmovement.org For coverage of the museum opening and more articles about the 50th anniversary of the sit-ins, visit www.news-record.com/news/museum
aplatonic 3

» civil rights The Bluegrass and Beyond - 2 views

  • “All of the adults looked after all of the children. Everybody knew each other. Everybody helped each other.”
  • Oakwood was special from the beginning. When the 106-home subdivision opened in 1964, it was only the second development in Lexington where African-Americans could buy a new house. The first, St. Martins Village, had opened a few years earlier, about a mile down Georgetown Road.
  • Oakwood opened the same year that Congress passed landmark civil rights legislation that prohibited housing discrimination. Before that, such discrimination was not only legal but widely practiced.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • The subdivision was carved from farmland near the factories of IBM, Square D and Trane. Those employers were willing to hire African-Americans and pay them enough so they could afford an Oakwood home, which then sold for about $20,000.
  • Those former Oakwood children remember how their parents emphasized education and hard work. “There was just no tolerance for not achieving
  •  
    This article highlights a truly unique place. I looked up some information about the subdivision and was delighted to know that it has virtually remained intact. Here are some statistics on the neighborhood: http://www.city-data.com/neighborhood/Oakwood-Lexington-KY.html
Claire Johns

KET | Living the Story | Civil Rights Timeline - 0 views

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    Time of the civil rights movement in Kentucky
aplatonic 3

Girl Scouts: Search Results - 1 views

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    These articles can help gain insight of The Girl Scout's roles during the civil rights era.
aplatonic 3

Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky - 0 views

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    Kentucky Historical Society Civil Rights Movemrnt in Kentucky Oral History Project
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