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Randolph Hollingsworth

Mary Virginia Cook Parrish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

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    by "dream big"
Randolph Hollingsworth

Killers of the Dream by Lillian Smith (1949) : New Georgia Encyclopedia - 0 views

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    Relates well to the lessons Anne Braden sought to teach us all here in Kentucky
aplatonic 3

She broke a race barrier | Education | Kentucky.com - 0 views

  • described her experiences as the first black student to ever attend a white school in Lexington, and the price her family paid for helping to break the color barrier in 1955.
  • Helen Caise Wade
charlie v

Georgia Davis Powers KET video - 0 views

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    This is the interview of Mrs. Powers and is extremely beneficial to our study of her. I think she was one of the most influential women of all time. She was able to influence and change so many lives in Kentucky and through out the south.
charlie v

Women's Rights Movement in the U.S. - 1 views

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    This website is very valuable because it offers a timeline begining in 1848 and extending until today. It displays conventions, names, and location of key points in the struggle for women's rights. It also has many names that when clicked on, leads you to more information about such person. Very valuable.
Big Bird

Southern African American Women and the Impact of Race, Gender, and Social Movements on... - 0 views

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    This is an excellent article written by Rosalee A. Clawson and John A. Clark that describes the dramatic affects that the social movements, gender, and race of southern African American women had on the dynamic of the Democratic party. Once a nearly all-white, male institution, the Democratic party changed after the New Deal and even more change was brought to it by the events of the Civil Rights Era. The comparisons and connections that Clawson and Clark make are thorough and well written.
Big Bird

"There Was No Middle Ground": Anne Braden and the Southern Social Justice Movement - 0 views

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    This article written by Catherine Fosl, the author of "Subversive Southerner", offers another account into the life of Anne Braden. However, this journal focuses more on Anne Braden's book "The Wall Between" and what role her and her husband played in helping the Wades, a black family, move into a white neighborhood.
One Ton

Famous Kentucky People - 0 views

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    Lists famous people (men and women) in each of the 50 states.
charlie v

Shiloh Baptist Church - 1 views

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    This website gives information on the history and on the mission of the church today. It is intresting to see the changes that tookplace and the involvement they had with the community during the civil rights era.
tiger lily

Georgia Powers talking about the march on Frankfort. - 2 views

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    This is a great Primary source of Georgia Davis Powers talking about the 1964 march on Frankfort trying to pass equal housing bill for Kentucky.
Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc... - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
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    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
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    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
One Ton

Women Reformers and Activists (Nationwide) - 1 views

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    Very long list of important women activists organized alphabetically. Not only KY women though.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Southern Conference for Human Welfare/Educational Fund - Oral History Interviews at Ind... - 0 views

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    5 interviews with civil rights activists in the early 1980s (Anne Braden, Virginia Foster Durr, Amelia Robinson, Fred Shuttlesworth, Frederick Palmer Weber) who discuss their involvement in the Southern Conference for Human Welfare/Educational Fund. Some of the main topics include segregation, poverty, legislation, and poll taxes. (Audiotapes, transcripts, and collateral materials housed in Weatherly Hall North, Room 122. Copies are also housed at the Indiana University Archives in Herman B Wells Library E460.) Braden interview by Linda Reed is 35 pages (90 minutes) - describes the disenfranchisement of Depression Era South and need for worker, economic and civil rights for Black Americans; discusses Congress of Industrial Organizations, House Un-American Activities Committee, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as the structure of the SCEF and the Southern Patriot.
Big Bird

The Evolution of Kinkeadtown(Now, MLK neighborhood) - 1 views

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    This article is written by Nancy O'Malley, a UK archeologist who uncovered many details of Kinkeadtown(MLK Neighborhood) that were left out of the history books. She desribes the layout of the neigborhood, the scoial and economic dynamic between blacks and whites, and the women of the households within the neighborhood itself.
One Ton

Important Women in KY History - 2 views

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    This website is not organized in any specific fashion but does give insights on important women in KY history.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Audrey Grevious Interview 1999 - full transcription as PDF - 1 views

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    Betsy Brinson, Civil Rights in KY project director for KY Oral HIstory Commission, interviewed Audrey Grevious of Lexington at her home in Fayette County, April 13, 1999. A powerful storyteller and great educator, Grevious is generous in her oral history interview though she tries to downplay the fact that she played a major role in the local civil rights movement here in central Kentucky. From KHS catalog "Audrey Grevious speaks of her early education in Black schools which led her to become a teacher. She also became an activist, and, as President of the Lexington NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) together with Julia Lewis, President of Lexington CORE (Congress on Racial Equality) led a movement to challenge segregation in employment, and public accommodations. She notes the involvement of maids and non-profession people and the scarcity of ministers, with the exception of Rev. W.A. Jones, Historic Pleasant Green Baptist Church. When school integration came to Lexington, she tells how the Black students and teachers lost out."
aplatonic 3

Kentuckiana Digital Library - 6 views

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    Primary sources can be found here through a search of your topic or person, etc. by searching newspapers, pictures, journals, oral history, manuscripts, maps, books.
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    This is a great site!!!! Use this people!!!!
Randolph Hollingsworth

Jennie Wilson - KHS, Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky - 2 views

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    This site hosted by the Kentucky Historical Society was created by oral historian and archivist Doug Boyd (now at the University of Kentucky) - it offers open access to the transcripts and the video clips of the original interview of Jennie Wilson. The video clips were then edited and used within the KET production, "Living the Story" - see that version at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm
Big Bird

Women in Military - Lt. Anna Mac Clarke - 2 views

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    Since I just came back from active duty, I found this biography of Lt. Anna Mac Clarke very interesting. She was an African American woman born in Lawrenceburg, KY and was the first female, African American female, to be specific, to command an all-white unit. I feel that this brief article not only demonstrates the magnitude of such an accomplishment, but that it also provides wonderful insight about a topic that deserves much more attention: women in the military. With both the historical background and significance of this article, I think others will find it just as useful.
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    This article is very interesting. It is hard to believe that an African American women who led an all white group of troops late in her military career was subject to swimming in the pool at her base camp in Iowa only for one hour a week on fridays, after the pool was sanitized. Lt. Clarke had to be a strong willed women who was constantly challenged in her military life due to the fact of being black and a women. The majority of the army being white men, this race and gender issue must of been a challenge each and everyday.
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