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Randolph Hollingsworth

KY native, Sophonisba Breckinridge, focus for Newberry Seminar on Women and Gender, Chi... - 1 views

  • November 12, 2010 Reform and Immigration in Chicago: Hull-House Alumnae in Action The Professor and the Prostitute: Sophonisba Breckinridge and the Morals Court in Depression-Era Chicago Anya Jabour, University of Montana In 1930, Sophonisba Breckinridge, Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, launched a campaign to investigate and reform legal procedures in the Morals Court, a specialized municipal court established to deal with accused prostitutes. Hailed as a model progressive reform at the time of its inception in 1913, by 1930 the Morals Court was plagued by routine violations of due process as well as charges of police corruption and institutionalized racism. Breckinridge1s campaign to secure civil rights for accused prostitutes offers a new perspective on the politics of prostitution and on feminist activism in the interwar period. Hilda Satt Polacheck (1882-1967): Worker, Writer, ‘Hull House Girl'Bridget K. O'Rourke, Elmhurst College Commentator: Rima Lunin Schultz, Independent Scholar
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    If you are planning to be in Chicago on November 12th, register for this terrific seminar on Sophonisba Breckinridge. Anya Jabour, an excellent historian, will be presenting a paper for discussion about a campaign by this innovative professor to reform the way the police and the court treated women of color.
Big Bird

Georgia Powers Interview - 1 views

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    This is the transcript of an interview done with Georgia Powers, Kentucky's first female African American Senator. This is also an excellent piece if anyone wants to include oral history into their project and also makes a great primary source.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Audrey Grevious Interview 1999 - full transcription as PDF - 1 views

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    Betsy Brinson, Civil Rights in KY project director for KY Oral HIstory Commission, interviewed Audrey Grevious of Lexington at her home in Fayette County, April 13, 1999. A powerful storyteller and great educator, Grevious is generous in her oral history interview though she tries to downplay the fact that she played a major role in the local civil rights movement here in central Kentucky. From KHS catalog "Audrey Grevious speaks of her early education in Black schools which led her to become a teacher. She also became an activist, and, as President of the Lexington NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) together with Julia Lewis, President of Lexington CORE (Congress on Racial Equality) led a movement to challenge segregation in employment, and public accommodations. She notes the involvement of maids and non-profession people and the scarcity of ministers, with the exception of Rev. W.A. Jones, Historic Pleasant Green Baptist Church. When school integration came to Lexington, she tells how the Black students and teachers lost out."
aplatonic 3

Kentuckiana Digital Library - 6 views

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    Primary sources can be found here through a search of your topic or person, etc. by searching newspapers, pictures, journals, oral history, manuscripts, maps, books.
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    This is a great site!!!! Use this people!!!!
Randolph Hollingsworth

Kentucky Women in the Civil Rights Era | Research Journals - 2 views

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    This link is where your terrific research journal entries reside - invite your community members to sign up and join the site so they can participate in the process... and keep it going after the semester is over!
Big Bird

Kentucky Women Artists - 1 views

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    A nice list of Kentucky Women artists from the beginning of the Civil Rights Era through the present. If anyone should find this useful, the list comprises at least 48 diffrent female artists from Kentucky, some of whom have had experinces and involvement in the Civil Rights Era and have incorporated these feelings and ideas into their artwork.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Jennie Wilson - KHS, Civil Rights Movement in Kentucky - 2 views

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    This site hosted by the Kentucky Historical Society was created by oral historian and archivist Doug Boyd (now at the University of Kentucky) - it offers open access to the transcripts and the video clips of the original interview of Jennie Wilson. The video clips were then edited and used within the KET production, "Living the Story" - see that version at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm
Big Bird

Women in Military - Lt. Anna Mac Clarke - 2 views

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    Since I just came back from active duty, I found this biography of Lt. Anna Mac Clarke very interesting. She was an African American woman born in Lawrenceburg, KY and was the first female, African American female, to be specific, to command an all-white unit. I feel that this brief article not only demonstrates the magnitude of such an accomplishment, but that it also provides wonderful insight about a topic that deserves much more attention: women in the military. With both the historical background and significance of this article, I think others will find it just as useful.
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    This article is very interesting. It is hard to believe that an African American women who led an all white group of troops late in her military career was subject to swimming in the pool at her base camp in Iowa only for one hour a week on fridays, after the pool was sanitized. Lt. Clarke had to be a strong willed women who was constantly challenged in her military life due to the fact of being black and a women. The majority of the army being white men, this race and gender issue must of been a challenge each and everyday.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Sisters in the Struggle: Jennie Wilson | uknow.uky.edu calendar - 3 views

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    Short notification of the AASRP race dialogues series starting on Sept 16 - the video is online at http://www.ket.org/civilrights/bio_jwilson.htm. The note would have been more useful if it included the KET website information and some description of expectation of the attendees, i.e., to discuss openly and respectfully very difficult issues regarding race, gender, sexuality, segregation and Kentucky's violent past (and present).
anonymous

Mae Street Kidd - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 1 views

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    This is a biography of Mae Street Kidd that looks substantial right now, but it does say not to cite due to lack of resources. The solution could be solved if they were to cite the "Passing for Black" book. Let me know if you think that this website would be informational to the rest of the group.
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