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Randolph Hollingsworth

Kentucky Women - Search Results - The Civil Rights History Project: Survey of Collectio... - 1 views

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    inc. WKU, UofL, KHS, Sisters of Charity of Nazarth Archival Center, Lindsey Wilson, as well as several collections at UK
Randolph Hollingsworth

Mary Virginia Cook Parrish - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

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    by "dream big"
Randolph Hollingsworth

Jayme Coleman: National Visionary Leadership Project: African American History - 0 views

  • Dr. Jamye Coleman William’s teaching career spans almost fifty years, the last fourteen of which she served as the head of the Department of Communication at Tennessee State University. In 1984, she assumed the editorship of the AME Church Review, the oldest black journal in America, becoming the first woman to be elected as a major officer in the 197-year history of the AME Church.
  • Williams’ co-edited the 1970 publication, The Negro Speaks: The Rhetoric of Contemporary Black Leaders.
  • VIDEO CLIPS
Claire Johns

Kentucky: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - Hall of Fame 2001 - 0 views

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    From here you can find many people who have been inducted into the Kentucky Hall of Fame. This is Dr. Marlatt, who helped start the Lexington chapter of CORE. 
charlie v

Public Service by Georgia Davis Powers - 0 views

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    This gives a vague overview for people who want to learn some intresting facts about this amazing women from Kentucky and the things she was able to accomplish during her time as a senator for 21 years in Kentucky.
charlie v

Georgia Davis Powers KET video - 0 views

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    This is the interview of Mrs. Powers and is extremely beneficial to our study of her. I think she was one of the most influential women of all time. She was able to influence and change so many lives in Kentucky and through out the south.
Randolph Hollingsworth

New Highway Sign Honors Former Senator Georgia Davis Powers | Kentucky Senate Democrati... - 0 views

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    This news announcement has a nice picture that is recent - let's find out iif photos provided by "LRC Public Information" (Legislative Research Council) are in the public domain and we can use it to fix the Wikipedia entry on her.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Georgia Davis Powers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 1 views

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    This needs fixing!!! Sad that it is a wiki-orphan! and no other sources besides her memoir ~ surely we can do better for the Senator than this.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Sisters in Struggle: Women in the Louisville Civil Rights Movement 1945 - 1975 | Univer... - 2 views

    • Randolph Hollingsworth
       
      I love this picture of Senator Powers! You can see how powerful a speaker she was then... and now too!
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    This is a website created by the University of Louisville and focuses on influential women from the time period who influenced the communities of Louisville. Some of the women mentioned are Mae Street Kidd, Ruth Booker Bryant and Thelma Stovall, who all played signifacant roles in the Civil Rights Movement in Louisville during the 50's, 60's and 70's.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Betty Friedan obit - Voice of Feminism's 'Second Wave' - washingtonpost.com - 0 views

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    Obituary for Betty Friedan, writer of the 1963 book, "The Feminine Mystique" and founder of many important feminist organizations, including the National Women's Political Caucus in the 1970s.
Big Bird

White women as Postmodern Vehicle of Black Oppression - 1 views

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    An interesting journal article written by Ronald E. Hall describing the way in which white women have indirectly become a form of oppression to African Americans. Hall insists that the feminist movement happened at such an inoppurtune time that because it invariably coincided with the civil rights movement, issues of civil rigjts that were attempting to be addressed were pushed to the wayside in favor of addressing the concerns of white women and the feminist movement. It is an interesting perspective on both accounts and deserves a look.
One Ton

Famous Friends - 1 views

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    List of people who spent part of their lives in the state of Kentucky.
charlie v

ACMHR - Alabama Christians Movement for Human Rights - 0 views

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    On June 1, 1956 all NAACP offices were forced to shut down in Alabama so a new organization was needed in Birmingham and throuhgout the southern state. The organization ran by a minister, focused on getting black police officers in Alabama, desgregation of the public schools and was associated by SCLC (Southern Christian Leadership Conference).
Big Bird

"There Was No Middle Ground": Anne Braden and the Southern Social Justice Movement - 0 views

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    This article written by Catherine Fosl, the author of "Subversive Southerner", offers another account into the life of Anne Braden. However, this journal focuses more on Anne Braden's book "The Wall Between" and what role her and her husband played in helping the Wades, a black family, move into a white neighborhood.
One Ton

Famous Kentucky People - 0 views

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    Lists famous people (men and women) in each of the 50 states.
charlie v

Shiloh Baptist Church - 1 views

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    This website gives information on the history and on the mission of the church today. It is intresting to see the changes that tookplace and the involvement they had with the community during the civil rights era.
tiger lily

Georgia Powers talking about the march on Frankfort. - 2 views

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    This is a great Primary source of Georgia Davis Powers talking about the 1964 march on Frankfort trying to pass equal housing bill for Kentucky.
Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc... - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
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    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
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    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
Randolph Hollingsworth

Minutes, SCEF Board of Directors - 1963-04-26 - Norfolk, VA - inc Bradens - 0 views

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    Anne is part of the discussion about the rejection of SCEF from the Southern Inter-Agency Conference - and how they would handle the communications with their sponsoring organizations (YMCA and SNCC). Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, "Minutes, SCEF Board of Directors," April 26, 1963, SCRID# 99-159-0-34-1-1-1ph, Series 2515: Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission Records, 1994-2006, Mississippi Department of Archives and History.
One Ton

Women Reformers and Activists (Nationwide) - 1 views

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    Very long list of important women activists organized alphabetically. Not only KY women though.
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