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charlie v

WILPF - 0 views

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    The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom was an organization used by Anne Braden in Louisville to keep in touch on a national level, to discuss issues going on all across the United States. Braden was also involved in Women's for Peace Group associated in Louisville and shared information with both groups. The website discuss the goals of todays organization and provides history of the organization.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Greensboro Sit-Ins: Launch of a Civil Rights Movement : Timeline - 0 views

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    A general timeline with big milestones indicated building up to the Greensboro public accommodations protests. The International Civil Rights Center & Museum opened last February on the 50th anniversary of the day the N.C. A&T freshmen refused to leave the whites-only lunch counter -- helping to inspire a national sit-in movement. More information about the museum is online at www.sitinmovement.org For coverage of the museum opening and more articles about the 50th anniversary of the sit-ins, visit www.news-record.com/news/museum
Randolph Hollingsworth

Book Review of Gregg L. Michel's Struggle for a Better South: The Southern Student Orga... - 0 views

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    This UW prof summarizes this history book that shows the importance of SSOC in educating Southern white students about civil rights - when most civil rights histories have focused on the roles of Southern blacks or Northern whites.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Sources of Support for the Old Right: A Comparison of the John Birch Society and the Ch... - 0 views

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    article from the Social Science History Vol. 12, No. 4 (Winter, 1988), pp. 429-449
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    This is an interesting article...if I'm reading the tables right, it appears that almost 30% of Southern whites were considered to be sympathetic/supportive to extreme right wing groups. All are assumed to be white, but racism isn't explicitly discussed as one of their beliefs, only anti-communist and anti-change sentiments... Did/does "anti-communist" serve as a euphemism for race issues?
Big Bird

"There Was No Middle Ground": Anne Braden and the Southern Social Justice Movement - 0 views

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    This article written by Catherine Fosl, the author of "Subversive Southerner", offers another account into the life of Anne Braden. However, this journal focuses more on Anne Braden's book "The Wall Between" and what role her and her husband played in helping the Wades, a black family, move into a white neighborhood.
Claire Johns

The My Hero Project - Women Had Key Roles in Civil Rights EraWomen_CivilRights_AP - 3 views

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    Another great article explaining the behind the scenes roles of black women in the civil rights movement. Also, this includes some of the more famous of these women. 
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    ``After the bus boycott got going and (Martin Luther) King got involved, they wouldn't even let Rosa Parks speak at the first mass meeting,'' she said. ``She asked to speak, and one of the ministers said he thought she had done enough.'' That is so insanely demeaning! I wonder who in the movement was propagating that repression of women's voices, MLK himself seemed very willing to engage women, at least in the Anne Braden reading. Great article, i agree.
One Ton

Famous Kentucky People - 0 views

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    Lists famous people (men and women) in each of the 50 states.
Mary __

Influential Women in The Civil Rights Era - 2 views

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    While looking around on the internet to try and find more about women in the civil rights era I came across this link that talks a about a book that would be a good resource for our class and possibly some group projects. Its a book about Women in the Civil Rights Movement from 1954-1965. I don't know if it would help but it might!
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    It's definitley a book that I would look through if it is available at the library
charlie v

Shiloh Baptist Church - 1 views

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    This website gives information on the history and on the mission of the church today. It is intresting to see the changes that tookplace and the involvement they had with the community during the civil rights era.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Urban League of Lexington releases "State of Black Lexington" report - 1 views

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    A report from a group that included people from the Urban League, the Lexington Commission on Race Relations, the University of Kentucky, the Office of the Mayor and other groups. The report includes a public opinion survey of 600 Fayette County residents (200 Whites, 200 Blacks, 200 Hispanics) by a reputable marketing communications and research firm.
tiger lily

Georgia Powers talking about the march on Frankfort. - 2 views

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    This is a great Primary source of Georgia Davis Powers talking about the 1964 march on Frankfort trying to pass equal housing bill for Kentucky.
tiger lily

Oral HIstory - 1 views

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    The Kentucky Historical Society has put together on this site the Oral History Project. They have recorded and transcribes stories from the Civil Rights Movement. They are all Kentuckians and is an excelling primary source regarding various topics that the interviewees discuss. I listen to Howard Bailey talk of what it was like to move from segregated color school to integrated school.
Jamsasha Pierce

Women overlooked in civil rights movement - U.S. news - Life - Race & ethnicity - msnbc... - 2 views

  • Visible, but unsung But scan historic
  • Visible, but unsung But scan historical images of the most dramatic moments of the civil rights movement — protesters blasted by fire hoses and dogs lunging at blacks — and women and girls are everywhere.
  • There is a 1964 image of Mississippi beautician Vera Piggy styling hair and educating her customers on voter registration.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Still unknown
  • Most were “volunteers — women in the churches who cooked the meals and made sure all the preparations were made, the ones who cleaned up after the rallies and got ready for the next one,” Kennedy said. “Most women who are sincerely interested in making a difference are not looking for the publicity for it. ... Making a true difference doesn’t always come with fanfare.”
  • Most women in the movement played background roles, either by choice or due to bias, since being a women of color meant facing both racism and sexism.
  • “In some ways it reflects the realities of the 1950s: There were relatively few women in public leadership roles,” said Julian Bond, a civil rights historian at the University of Virginia and chair of the NAACP. “So that small subset that becomes prominent in civil rights would tend to be men. But that doesn’t excuse the way some women have just been written out of history.”
  • nd there’s a 1963 photo of students at Florida A&M University, a historically black college, in which hundreds of people, mostly women, answer court charges for protesting segregated movie theaters.
  • The women arranged car pools and sold cakes and pies to raise money for alternate transportation.
  • Countless women in the movement could have spoken: Ella Baker was a charismatic labor organizer and longtime leader in the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She believed the movement should not place too much emphasis on leaders. Septima Poinsette Clark, often called the “queen mother” of civil rights, was an educator and National Association for the Advancement of Colored People activist decades before the nation’s attention turned to racial equality.
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    Woman had key roles in civil rights movement is an article on msnbc.com which discuses what we have been discussing in class. How woman with in the civil rights movement are largely unknown and remained in the background. It names several woman involved nationally in civil rights including Ella Baker, Septima Poinsetta Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Vivian Jones.
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    I think this article reiterates exactly what our class has been talking about how women were overlooked and more behind the scenes in this movement. The women were not really given the credit they deserve and this article realizes that and touches on important aspects that our class has talked about.
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    A great article highlighting some of the behind the scenes roles of women. It also describes how many women, which were involved in the movement are still unknown. 
Syle Khaw

Edward T. Breathitt - 0 views

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    He passed the Kentucky Civil Rights Act which was the first desegregation law passed by a southern sate. Has an oral history available in Kentucky libraries and it is also available online.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Minutes, SCEF Board of Directors - 1963-04-26 - Norfolk, VA - inc Bradens - 0 views

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    Anne is part of the discussion about the rejection of SCEF from the Southern Inter-Agency Conference - and how they would handle the communications with their sponsoring organizations (YMCA and SNCC). Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission, "Minutes, SCEF Board of Directors," April 26, 1963, SCRID# 99-159-0-34-1-1-1ph, Series 2515: Mississippi State Sovereignty Commission Records, 1994-2006, Mississippi Department of Archives and History.
One Ton

Women Reformers and Activists (Nationwide) - 1 views

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    Very long list of important women activists organized alphabetically. Not only KY women though.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Southern Conference for Human Welfare/Educational Fund - Oral History Interviews at Ind... - 0 views

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    5 interviews with civil rights activists in the early 1980s (Anne Braden, Virginia Foster Durr, Amelia Robinson, Fred Shuttlesworth, Frederick Palmer Weber) who discuss their involvement in the Southern Conference for Human Welfare/Educational Fund. Some of the main topics include segregation, poverty, legislation, and poll taxes. (Audiotapes, transcripts, and collateral materials housed in Weatherly Hall North, Room 122. Copies are also housed at the Indiana University Archives in Herman B Wells Library E460.) Braden interview by Linda Reed is 35 pages (90 minutes) - describes the disenfranchisement of Depression Era South and need for worker, economic and civil rights for Black Americans; discusses Congress of Industrial Organizations, House Un-American Activities Committee, Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, Southern Christian Leadership Conference as well as the structure of the SCEF and the Southern Patriot.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Section of Highway in Louisville named for Georgia Davis Powers - Press Release June 16... - 0 views

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    Press release of unveiling of new highway sign by Governor Beshear and Louisville-area community leaders to celebrate Georgia Davis Powers - 7.5 mile section of I-264 in western Louisville is now the Georgia Davis Powers Expressway as per the House Joint Resolution 67 of the 2010 General Assembly.
Randolph Hollingsworth

50th Anniversary Conference: Kentucky Commission on Human Rights - 1 views

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    Thursday, Oct. 14th in Louisville, the Kentucky Commission on Human Rights will celebrate its 50th Anniversary Civil and Human Rights Conference. John Trasviña, assistant Secretary of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity for the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development, will announce the launch of a new HUD Fair Housing Innovative Education Program at Kentucky State University. The program is called The National Fair Housing Collegiate Partnership and is a practical concept designed to promote fair housing and educate students about their rights under the U.S. Fair Housing Act. This law prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, color, religion, disability, sex, national origin and families with children. The HUD partnership program at Kentucky State University will also provide information for students who have interests in pursuing civil rights related careers.
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