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Bill Genereux

Opinion: Papert led revolution in learning - 23 views

  • I think he would protest the extent to which schooling — assisted by computers or not — continues to be largely dominated by a mindset presupposing young people will not learn unless they are taught, and how few freedoms are offered students to self-direct their own learning.
  • I am convinced that the best learning takes place when the learner takes charge.
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    I think he would protest the extent to which schooling - assisted by computers or not - continues to be largely dominated by a mindset presupposing young people will not learn unless they are taught, and how few freedoms are offered students to self-direct their own learning.
  • ...2 more comments...
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Bill Genereux

Why Flip The Classroom When We Can Make It Do Cartwheels? | Co.Exist: World changing id... - 27 views

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Mike Wesch

Dr. Tae - Building A New Culture Of Teaching And Learning on Vimeo - 21 views

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    shared your video with a colleague. Congratulations for your marvelous work. Really enjoyed: An anthropological introduction to YouTube. I have bookmarked your YouTube Channel.
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    p.s. I wanted to ask how you achieved the "zoom-out-on-a-path effect" on the static images you presented on your "Anthropological introduction to YouTube". I know how it can be done with stand alone expensive software, but was wondering whether there was a cheaper way or a hack.
Steven Kelly

Why You Learn More Effectively by Writing Than Typing - 10 views

















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    Why You Learn More Effectively by Writing Than Typing




    Melanie Pinola —


    The act of writing helps you clarify your thoughts, remember things better, and reach your goals more surely. Here's a look at the science and psychology behind writing, and why the pen may be mightier than the keyboard.
    <script type="text/javascript"
    • Kelsey Duck
       
      This is awesome. Do you have any sights where I can look this kind of "keyboard" up
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    Interesting article about the learning benefits of traditional writing vs. typing.
Derek Schneweis

Learning styles research - 1 views

  • Though faculty may attempt to utilize the same teaching methods in a distance environment that they would employ in an equivalent on-campus class, the data from the current study suggest that faculty will encounter significantly different learning preferences as well as other different student characteristics.
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    What is the best way to teach online and in lecture? Can we use both in an effective way?
Mike Wesch

The New Atlantis » Is Stupid Making Us Google? - 0 views

  • “as we come to rely on computers to mediate our understanding of the world, it is our own intelligence that flattens into artificial intelligence.”
  • what we are witnessing is not just an educational breakdown but a deformation of the very idea of intelligence.
  • Even those who have come to the Web late in life are not so very different, then, from the fifth-graders who, as an elementary school principal told Bauerlein, proceed as follows when they are assigned a research project: “go to Google, type keywords, download three relevant sites, cut and paste passages into a new document, add transitions of their own, print it up, and turn it in.”
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  • even those who are most gung-ho about new ways of learning probably tend to cling to a belief that education has, or ought to have, at least something to do with making things lodge in the minds of students—this even though the disparagement of the role of memory in education by professional educators now goes back at least three generations, long before computers were ever thought of as educational tools.
  • adapting its understanding of what education is to the new realities of how the new generation of “netizens” actually learn (and don’t learn) rather than trying to adapt the kids to unchanging standards of scholarship and learning.
  • “lower-order skills” in comparison with the spatial, information-gathering, and pattern-recognition skills fostered by hours at the computer screen
  • can’t imagine a mathematician saying the same thing about math, or a biologist about biology, yet, sad to say, scholars, journalists, and other guardians of culture accept the deterioration of their province without much regret.
  • humanities stopped being, or even wanting to be, “guardians of culture” a long time ago.
  • In other words, the “mentors” have not only betrayed their pupils, they have denounced the very idea of mentorship in anything but the tools of deconstruction which allow them to set themselves up as superior to—rather than the humble acolytes of—the culture they study.
  • redefining education as the acquisition of information-retrieval skills
  • No one has ever taught them that books can be read for pleasure or enlightenment—or for any other purpose than to be exposed as the coded rationalization for the illegitimate powers of the ruling classes that they really are
  • But while Bauerlein takes Johnson to task on several points, he seems to suggest that all our educators have to do is expose their charges to some superior alternative to “the ordinary stuff of youth culture”
  • “Young people,” he rightly notes, “need mentors not to go with the youth flow, but to stand staunchly against it, to represent something smarter and finer than the cacophony of social life.” He’s also right that they need more time away from the computer in order to acquire the skills of “deep reading” recommended by Nicholas Carr.
  • But they are not likely to get either one so long as so many educators cling as they do now to the axiomatic belief not just that “learning can be fun” but that it must be fun, and the equally axiomatic rejection of that which may cause pain and humiliation, even if these are productive of real learning
    • Kevin Champion
       
      Well, learning certainly is fun! The process of learning can often times be difficult, terrifying, exciting, depressing, saddening etc. What's interesting is that there is no mention of relevance here. Learning is not always fun, but I think it is always fun when it is relevant. It also seems that the subjective experience of learning only occurs when it is fun. It doesn't feel like learning to me unless it is relevant to me; if it is relevant to me, it is fun!

      By extension, perhaps we benefit from thinking about learning from both subjective and objective perspectives, including both singular and collective objects (learning of an individual subjectively and objectively + learning of a group subjectively and objectively).
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