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J Black

Driving Change: Selling SharePoint and Social Media Inside the Enterprise - ReadWriteWeb - 0 views

  • balk at the technology because they have no desire to share their knowledge for the benefit of the organization. These individuals tend to equate their knowledge with job security; therefore, they feel nervous about sharing out of fear that they wouldn't be needed any more.
  • "Look for agnostics, ignore atheists."
  • busy workers will not respond to buzzwords like "wiki," "blog," and "community."
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  • The point here is to take collaborative technology and apply it to processes that are routine and can be easily completed.
  • My personal experience has been that most people don't care what tool they are using, just as long as its easy, or easier then the way they had to do it before if that makes sense. And that most people don't want to change the way that they're doing things currently, even if its obviously easier, because currently = comfortable and change = scary.
  • knowledge management is about the people and their attitudes; it is about cooperation.
  • Writing a lot and reading a lot feels natural to us, but to many people it is a chore - so we end up being our wiki's sole active user.
  • You are not selling a tool. You are trying to help people work in a smarter and more efficient way.
  •  
    Though this article is written for the business sector, there are many great parallels with how we experience social media's acceptance in the educational realm. The suggestions that are given are readily applied to our setting, as well. In the enterprise, many employees think blogs are merely websites on which people talk about their cat or their latest meal. Many don't know the differences between and advantages of such tools as message boards, blogs, and wikis. They have heard of these terms in passing, but the demands of their day-to-day jobs have prevented them from recognizing the distinct benefits of each tool. Solution: It is useless to advocate for social media tools in a vacuum. Unless you're describing a solution to a practical problem, busy workers will not respond to buzzwords like "wiki," "blog," and "community." Your client usually has about a 30-second attention span in which you can sell a social media tool. An aide in my arsenal has been the excellent videos by Lee Lefever at Common Craft. Lee visually explains social media concepts "In Plain English." Common Craft videos quickly explain complex and sometimes unfamiliar technologies in a few minutes, sans the buzzwords, hype, and sensationalism. Problem: Cynical Clients Who Don't Want to Share Information Unfortunately, some potential SharePoint users balk at the technology because they have no desire to share their knowledge for the benefit of the organization. These individuals tend to equate their knowledge with job security; therefore, they feel nervous about sharing out of fear that they wouldn't be needed any more.
J Black

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 1 views

  • New media demand new literacies. Because of inexpensive, easy-to-use, widely distributed new media tools, being literate now means being able to read and write a number of new media forms, including sound, graphics, and moving images in addition to text.
  • New media coalesce into a collage. Being literate also means being able to integrate emerging new media forms into a single narrative or "media collage," such as a Web page, blog, or digital story.
  • New media are largely participatory, social media. Digital literacy requires that students have command of the media collage within the context of a social Web, often referred to as Web 2.0. The social Web provides venues for individual and collaborative narrative construction and publication through blogs and such services as MySpace, Google Docs, and YouTube. As student participation goes public, the pressure to produce high-quality work increases.
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  • Historically, new media first appear to the vast majority of us in read-only form because they are controlled by a relatively few technicians, developers, and distributors who can understand or afford them. The rest of us only evolve into writers once the new media tools become easy to use, affordable, and widely available, whether these tools are cheap pencils and paper or inexpensive digital tools and shareware.
  • Thus, a new dimension of literacy is now in play—namely, the ability to adapt to new media forms and fit them into the overall media collage quickly and effectively.
  • n the mid 1960s, Marshall McLuhan explained that conventional literacy caused us to trade an ear for an eye, and in so doing, trade the social context of the oral tradition for the private point of view of reading and social. To him, television was the first step in our "retribalization," providing a common social experience that could serve as the basis for dialogue in the global village.2  However, television told someone else's story, not ours. It was not until Web 2.0 that we had the tools to come full circle and produce and consume social narrative in equal measure. Much of the emerging nature of literacy is a result of inexpensive, widely available, flexible Web 2.0 tools that enable anyone, regardless of technical skill, to play some part in reinventing literacy.
  • What is new is that the tools of literacy, as well as their effects, are now a topic of literacy itself.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital tools, but also when to use them and why.
  • The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • They need to be the guide on the side rather than the technician magician.
J Black

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:The World at Our Fingertips - 0 views

  • Teaching students to contribute and collaborate online in ways that are both safe and appropriate requires instruction and modeling, not simply crossing our fingers and hoping for the best when they go home and do it on their own.
  • "Now more than ever, students need teachers who can help them sort through choices, apply technology well, and tell their stories clearly and with humanity."
  • Among our authors' guidelines for promoting the skills crucial to using social media well: Value reading and social more than ever; Blend digital, art, oral, and written literacies; and Teach students to search, evaluate, summarize, interpret, and think and write clearly.
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  • As a result, the way we communicate, read, write, listen, persuade, learn from others, and accomplish community actions is changing. Or, as someone said when we were planning this issue of Educational Leadership, "Literacy—it's not just learning to read a book anymore."
J Black

PostRank - 0 views

  •  
    PostRank™ PostRank is a scoring system developed by AideRSS to rank any kind of online content, such as RSS feed items, blog posts, articles, or news stories. PostRank is based on social engagement, which refers to how interesting or relevant people have found an item or category to be. Examples of engagement include social a blog post in response to someone else, bookmarking an article, leaving a comment on a blog, or clicking a link to read a news item. **scroll down to see how this system of ranking works
J Black

The Winnie the Pooh Guide to Blogging - Copyblogger - 0 views

  • glucose-low grumpiness
  • Tug on their sleeve. Tap on their shoulder. Pull on their hand. Whisper in their ear.
  • If the person you are talking to doesn’t appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.
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  • People really do have fluff in their ears, so work on conveying your message more effectively in your comment section or write up a new post to clarify the concept.
  • The bigger picture was more important than the little hitches along the way.
  • Obstacles cropped up constantly, but that didn’t bother Pooh either. He expected adversity to happen. When it did, Pooh seemed almost pleased, as if he were greeting an old friend come to visit.
  • You’ve come this far, and you can do it again, so there’s no point in getting stressed out until your seams split. Make a new plan and get on with it.
  •  
    Given that the happiness and feelings of his friends are Pooh's chief concern (other than hunny, that is), he'd likely build a strong community as a blogger. Here are six social media lessons we can all learn from the lovable bear who's stuffed with fluff.
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