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dr tech

Whatsapp integrates Moxie Marlinspike's Textsecure end-to-end crypto - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Marlinspike's Textsecure has an impeccable reputation as a secure platform, and Whatsapp founder Jan Koum attributes his desire to add security to his users' conversations to his experiences with the surveillance state while growing up in Soviet Ukraine. However, without any independent security audit or (even better) source-code publication, we have to take the company's word that it has done the right thing and that it's done it correctly."
dr tech

The malware that's pwning the Internet of Things is terrifyingly amateurish / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "If mediocre malware can power some of the largest DDoS attacks ever, and considering the sad state of security of the Internet of security in general, we should probably brace for more cyberattacks powered by our easy-to-hack "smart" Internet of security, as many, including ourselves, had predicted months ago."
dr tech

Viral anime photo filter app Meitu sparks security and privacy concerns - 0 views

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    "But when you dive into the code of Meitu, that's where things get interesting. things researchers have jumped in to assess the photo editing app and found that it was indeed collecting information, including a phone's IMEI number (a handset's unique ID number), and sending it back to remote servers:"
dr tech

Internet-connected teddy bear leaked kids' data online / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Security researcher Troy Hunt reports that the snuggly spies, from Spiral Toys, Security researcher Troy Hunt reports that the snuggly spies, from Spiral Toys, "represents the nexus" of the problem with internet-connected appliances and toys: children being recorded, data being leaked, and the technical possibility of surreptitious access to children through networked toys. "The best way to understand what these guys do is to simply watch the video [advertisement for the toy].""
dr tech

How the Internet of Things Is Dangerous For Your Kids - 0 views

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    "It happened when Hello Kitty's fan site, SanrioTown.com, had its database accessed in late 2015. Here's the catch - it wasn't hacked. According to security researcher Chris Vickery of Kromtech, no hack was necessary. Vickery stated that pretty much anyone could access, "…first and last names, birthday…, gender, country of origin, email addresses, unsalted SHA-1 password hashes, password hint questions, their corresponding answers…," and more."
dr tech

Rise of the machines: who is the 'internet of things' good for? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "So, yes: the internet of things presents many new possibilities, and it would be foolish to dismiss those possibilities out of hand. But we would also be wise to approach the entire domain with scepticism, and in particular to resist the attempts of companies to gather ever more data about our lives - no matter how much ease, convenience and self-mastery we are told they are offering us."
dr tech

Why the internet of things is the new magic ingredient for cyber criminals | John Naughton | Opinion | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The significance of the attack on Krebs is that it looks as though many of the attacks on him came from large numbers of enslaved devices - routers, cameras, networked TVs and the like. "Someone has a botnet with capabilities we haven't seen before," says Martin McKeay, Akamai's senior security expert. The DDoS arms race has just moved up a gear."
dr tech

Botnets running on CCTVs and NASs / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Researchers at Incapsula have discovered a botnet that runs on compromised CCTV cameras. There are hundreds of millions, if not billions, of these in the field, and like many Internet of Things devices, their Things is an afterthought and not fit for purpose. "
dr tech

Public apathy over GCHQ snooping is a recipe for disaster | Technology | The Observer - 0 views

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    "Now spool forward to the present. One of the things that baffles me is why more people are not alarmed by what Edward Snowden has been telling us about the scale and intrusiveness of internet surveillance. My hunch is that this is partly because - strangely - people can't relate the revelations to things they personally understand."
dr tech

Facial recognition technology is Australia's latest 'national security weapon' - 0 views

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    "While Keenan emphasised the capability was not a centralised biometric database, and was simply an improved way to share information already collected by different Australian jurisdictions, Gregory questioned how these images of Australians will be employed by law enforcement. "It's subtle changes in the way that things are used that need to be debated the most," he said. "In this case, we're talking about using our passport photos for a purpose for which we never gave permission.""
dr tech

Surveillance used to be a bad thing. Now, we happily let our employers spy on us | André Spicer | Opinion | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "This RFID-enabled device allowed its proud new owners to do things such as log into their computer, open doors and purchase food in the office cafeteria with a flick of the wrist. Nearly half of the company's 85 workers had the device implanted when the firm held a "chip party". YIKES!
dr tech

Schneier's "Click Here To Kill Everyone": pervasive connected devices mean we REALLY can't afford shitty internet policy / Boing Boing - 1 views

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    "I've got a theory of change I call the "peak indifference" theory. The early stage of a crisis involves trying to convince people that the crisis even exists, because things haven't gotten really terrible yet and it's not obvious that there's anything to really worry about, and the people who profit from the status quo will spend liberally to convince people that there's no reason to worry or change anything (see also: climate change, Facebook, cancer from smoking)."
dr tech

Wristband Lets Users Unlock Bitcoin Wallets With Heartbeats | Singularity Hub - 0 views

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    "We're tempted to file this one under "the more things change, the more they stay the same." A wristband, called Nymi, that taps the user's heartbeat as a biometric marker, will also double as a bitcoin wallet."
dr tech

10 things you need to know about biometrics technology | Technology | The Observer - 0 views

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    "Schools in the UK have experimented with fingerprinting pupils then using that data for tasks including library books and lunch payments. However, the European Commission has questioned the practice, including whether schools can make it compulsory and whether parents can challenge it in court."
amenosolja

A Smile Detector and Other Apps You Need to Be Using | WIRED - 0 views

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    "RECHO DOES ONE very simple, little thing: It lets you leave a voice message tied to a location. When other people using the app hit those coordinates, Recho will tell them there's something to listen to. You can use the app to discover different "rechoes" around you, if you actively want to listen in on someone's location-aware thoughts. You can also share interesting soundbytes with your Recho followers. It's a little weird and novel, but ultimately a new way to think about digital exploring a place."
dr tech

A search-engine for insecure cameras, from baby-monitors to grow-ops / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Shodan is a search engine for the Internet of Things, scanning the public Internet for devices communicating on ports and over protocols that are commonly used by IoT devices. By feeding it the right parameters -- Real Time Streaming Protocol (RTSP, port 554) -- you can find innumerable publicly shared webcams, ranging from CCTVs that oversee marijuana grow-ops and many, many baby-monitors. "
dr tech

Opinion | The Worm That Nearly Ate the Internet - The New York Times - 0 views

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    "While some experts still disagree, most now believe that Conficker was the work of Ukrainian cybercriminals building a platform for global theft who succeeded beyond all expectation, or desire. The last thing a thief wants is to draw attention to himself. Conficker's unprecedented growth drew the alarmed attention of cybersecurity experts worldwide. It became, simply, too hot to use."
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