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dr tech

The principle of privacy is worth fighting for | Technology | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    "The principle of privacy, if we want privacy, needs to be fought for at every level. It has become a terrible cliche to talk about George Orwell's nightmare vision of 1984, but read the book again and be reminded of the horror it depicts. And then realise how short a step it is from the telescreen to your iPhone screen."
dr tech

Stop Saying Privacy Is Dead - Member Feature Stories - Medium - 0 views

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    "As privacy scholar Josh Fairfield says, while some dismiss privacy concerns by saying they have nothing to hide, we shouldn't accept that argument from anyone wearing clothes. Or anyone who closes the bathroom door, locks her home or car, or uses password-protected accounts. Or anyone who benefits from rules and norms that protect secrecy and confidentiality, prohibit government overreach, and give us recourse if others intrude upon our seclusion, publicly disclose embarrassing private facts, depict us in a false light, or appropriate our image or likeness. "
dr tech

The dick pic test: are you happy to show the government yours? | James Ball | Comment is free | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "If you're doing nothing wrong, and have nothing to hide from your government, then mass surveillance holds no fears for you. This argument might be the oldest straw man in the privacy debate, but it's also a decent reflection of the state of the argument. In the UK's first major election since the Snowden revelations, privacy is a nonissue. This is a shame, because when it comes down to it, many of us who are doing nothing wrong have plenty we would prefer to hide."
dr tech

The Media's Double Standard on Privacy and Cambridge Analytica - 0 views

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    "In the fawning media coverage of the Obama campaign's technological prowess, it did not occur to observers at the time to call this a startling invasion of privacy. And it wasn't, or at a very minimum, the privacy risks were arguably outweighed by the benefits. A tool like this could be the future of politics: door-to-door canvassing for the digital age, and a welcome antidote to impersonal broadcast TV ads or a welcome upgrade from getting a phone call from a stranger telling you to vote."
jamandham

Scientists claim breakthrough in quest for invisibility technology - 0 views

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    This is not necessarily to do with ITGS however it does bring up some similar issues that we discuss in class.
dr tech

Open Rights Group Scotland - E-voting's Unsolvable Problem - 0 views

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    Ahhh ITGS group - a great discussion on the evoting problem would have been perfect for your Paper 2. "Remember: all of these principles of security, anonymity and verifiability have to be achieved in an understandable way. If they can't be then you get the opportunity for losers to claim fraud, and their supporters to believe them."
Mcdoogleh CDKEY

BBC News - Facebook reveals 'simplified' privacy changes - 0 views

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    PRIVACY. MAJOR ISSUE APPARENTLY. ANGRY TYPING AS WELL. SORRY DOC T. I'VE GOT 1700 WORDS FOR MY PRIVACY PORTFOLIO! SHOULD I START CUTTING?!?!!
dr tech

Facebook isn't looking out for your privacy. It wants your data for itself | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "If Facebook cared about unfair profiling and privacy abuse, for instance, it would probably not have started grouping its users together based on their "Ethnic Affinity". It wouldn't then allow that ethnic affinity to be used as a basis for excluding users from advertisements, and it certainly wouldn't allows that ethnic affinity to be used as a basis for potentially illegal discrimination in real estate advertising."
dr tech

How tracking customers in-store will soon be the norm | Technology | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    "Emma Carr, the deputy director general of Big Brother Watch, believes that the technology ignores customers' privacy, and branded it "disproportionate". "This is a clear example of profit trumping privacy," she said. "The use of surveillance technology by shops, in order to provide a better or more personalised service, seems totally disproportionate.""
dr tech

It's Your Data - But Others Are Making Billions Off It - 0 views

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    "Here's the thing about privacy: It's tedious. Rather than dwell on Google being accused of illegal wiretapping with Street View, or whether Facebook got explicit consent from users before a recent update in privacy practices, we need to evolve the conversation around the monetization of our data in the digital realm toward identity. "
unicorn16829149

Qualcomm Brings Artificial Intelligence to Smartphone Security | TIME - 0 views

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    "Upcoming cell phone chips from Qualcomm will use artificial intelligence to block malware before it infects your phone. The chip company said on Monday that the next-generation Snapdragon 820 processor used in a variety of Android smartphones will be the first chip that uses machine learning to detect threats and privacy issues thanks to an application called Snapdragon Smart Protect." Qualcomm is trying to use artificial intelligence in a chip for smart phones. The chip will learn to detect any privacy or security issues that would usually be hard to detect.
amenosolja

Windows 10 Is Watching: Should You Be Worried? - 0 views

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    "In amongst the numerous reports of privacy infringements, there have been a handful of genuine issues. Reports of Microsoft utilizing your computer as a P2P node for update sharing were completely founded, and the 13 pages of privacy settings are also no joke."
dr tech

Riding with the Stars: Passenger Privacy in the NYC Taxicab Dataset - Research - 0 views

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    "The most well-documented of these deals with the hash function used to "anonymize" the license and medallion numbers. A bit of lateral thinking from one civic hacker and the data was completely de-anonymized. This data can now be used to calculate, for example, any driver's annual income. More disquieting, though, in my opinion, is the privacy risk to passengers. With only a small amount of auxiliary knowledge, using this dataset an attacker could identify where an individual went, how much they paid, weekly habits, etc. I will demonstrate how easy this is to do in the following section."
dr tech

Singapore to test facial recognition on lampposts, stoking privacy fears - 0 views

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    "SINGAPORE - In the not too distant future, surveillance cameras sitting atop over 100,000 lampposts in Singapore could help authorities pick out and recognise faces in crowds across the island-state. The plan to install the cameras, which will be linked to facial recognition software, is raising privacy fears among security experts and rights groups. The government said the system would allow it to "perform crowd analytics" and support anti-terror operations."
dr tech

Most GDPR emails unnecessary and some illegal, say experts | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The vast majority of emails flooding inboxes across Europe from companies asking for consent to keep recipients on their mailing list are unnecessary and some may be illegal, privacy experts have said, as new rules over data privacy come into force at the end of this week."
dr tech

"Privacy Not Included": Mozilla's guide to insecure, surveillant gadgets to avoid / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    ""Privacy Not Included" is Mozilla's Christmas shopping (anti)-guide to toys and gadgets that spy on you and/or make stupid security blunders, rated by relative "creepiness," from the Nintendo Switch (a little creepy) to the Fredi Baby monitor (very creepy!). Mozilla's reviews include a detailed rationale for each ranking, including whether the product includes encryption, whether it forces a default password change, how easy to understand the documentation is, whether it shares your data for "unexpected reasons," whether it has known security vulnerabilities, whether it has parental controls and more."
dr tech

Why Targeted Ads Are a Serious Threat to Your Privacy - 0 views

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    "Data collection is a prerequisite to delivering targeted ads, so their use will inherently stir up privacy concerns. Ad companies are incentivized to collect and share as much data as they can, with safeguarding this information only a secondary issue at best. Breaches are a concern largely because of the potential fallout to a company's brand."
dr tech

Opinion | The Privacy Project - The New York Times - 0 views

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    GREAT website with lots of debate re Privacy issues...
dr tech

Generation AI: What happens when your child's friend is an AI toy that talks back? | World Economic Forum - 0 views

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    "If that data is collected, does the child have a right to get it back? If that data is collected from very early childhood and does not belong to the child, does it make the child extra vulnerable because his or her choices and patterns of behaviour could be known to anyone who purchases the data, for example, companies or political campaigns. Depending on the privacy laws of the state in which the toys are being used, if the data is collected and kept, it breaches Article 16 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child - the right to privacy. (Though, of course, arguably this is something parents routinely do by posting pictures of their children on Facebook). "
dr tech

Google might scan your face and give you a $5 gift card for it - TechSpot - 0 views

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    ""I don't really care about data privacy because I think it's all an illusion anyway." It's interesting to see how this encounter also reflects the general behavior of a majority of people when it comes to privacy. Although user data has long been a gold mine for companies, would it be more acceptable if they started paying their users in exchange for it?"
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