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dr tech

Password strength meters fail to spot easy-to-crack examples | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Instead password strength meters measure entropy - the amount of time or energy needed to crack a password using brute force methods. The longer and more complex the password, the longer it will take to crack by simply iterating through a list of all possible password. According to Stockley, however, brute force is a password cracker's last resort."
dr tech

Sixth-grader creates method for deriving highly secure, yet easily remembered passwords -- Science & Technology -- Sott.net - 0 views

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    ""All passwords are Diceware generated and contain six words," Mira says on her website. "I write the passwords by hand and do not keep a copy of what I have sent to you. The passwords are sent by U.S. Postal Mail, which cannot be opened by the government without a search warrant." She also recommends you alter the pass phrase slightly after she sends it to you."
dr tech

Starbucks: We Stored Your Passwords in Plaintext - 0 views

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    "User information, including passwords, email addresses, usernames and geolocation data, was unencrypted - making it readily accessible to anyone who plugs the handset into a PC, according to a report detailing the vulnerability."
dr tech

The Celebrity Photo Hack Goes Far Beyond iCloud - 0 views

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    "iTunes phishing scams Compromised phones or computers Celebrity passwords/emails as part of a larger passwords dump (such as the Adobe hack) Mobile-phone or computer-repair individuals abusing access passwords reset questions guess Brute force"
dr tech

Worst passwords of 2014 are just as terrible as you'd think - 0 views

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    "1. 123456 (Unchanged from 2013) 2. password (Unchanged) 3. 12345 (Up 17) 4. 12345678 (Down 1) 5. qwerty (Down 1) 6. 234567890 (Unchanged) 7. 1234 (Up 9) 8. baseball (New) 9. dragon (New) 10. football (New) 11. 1234567 (Down 4) 12. monkey (Up 5) 13. letmein (Up 1) 14. abc123 (Down 9) 15. 111111 (Down 8) 16. mustang (New) 17. access (New) 18. shadow (Unchanged) 19. master (New) 20. michael (New) 21. superman (New) 22. 696969 (New) 23. 123123 (Down 12) 24. batman (New) 25. trustno1 (Down 1)"
dr tech

How your child's art could unlock a more secure online world | Technology | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    ""Kids forget passwords all the time," says Alexander Cole, the chief executive of Edinburgh-based Peekabu. "They're often unfamiliar with the concept of logging in, there is often no username or social media account to remind them of their passwords when they forget it. And it's a real problem because the BBC's really keen to have children creating accounts, making friends with one another, and playing multiplayer games with their friends from the real world."
dr tech

Brute-force iPhone password guesser can bypass Apple's 10-guess lockout - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "The IP Box costs less than £200 and can guess all possible four-digit passwords in 111 hours. The device bypasses the secure wipe triggered by ten bad guesses by "aggressively cutting the power after each failed PIN attempt, but before the attempt has been synchronized to flash memory." "
dr tech

Hacker fakes German minister's fingerprints using photos of her hands | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "It's an old cliché of security researchers: fingerprints might appear more secure than security. But if your security gets stolen, you can change it to a new one; what happens when your fingerprint gets copied?"
dr tech

How the Internet of Things Is Dangerous For Your Kids - 0 views

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    "It happened when Hello Kitty's fan site, SanrioTown.com, had its database accessed in late 2015. Here's the catch - it wasn't hacked. According to security researcher Chris Vickery of Kromtech, no hack was necessary. Vickery stated that pretty much anyone could access, "…first and last names, birthday…, gender, country of origin, email addresses, unsalted SHA-1 security hashes, security hint questions, their corresponding answers…," and more."
Max van Mesdag

How secure is your e-mail password? | Inpassword Complex - 0 views

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    Your e-mail password may be easier to access than you may have thought.
dr tech

Facebook App's Password Data Breach Turns into Lawsuit - 0 views

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    32 million passwords compromised - yikes...
dr tech

Hacker Finds He Can Remotely Kill Car Engines After Breaking Into GPS Tracking Apps - Motherboard - 1 views

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    "By reverse engineering ProTrack and iTrack's Android apps, L&M said he realized that all customers are given a default password of 123456 when they sign up. At that point, the hacker said he brute-forced "millions of usernames" via the apps' API. Then, he said he wrote a script to attempt to login using those usernames and the default password. "
dr tech

Largest dump in history: 2.7 billion records; 773 million of them unique; 140 million never seen before / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "A dump called "Collection #1" has been released by parties unknown, containing email addresses and cracked passwords: in its raw form, it contains 2.7 billion records, which Troy "Have I Been Pwned" Hunt (previously) de-duplicated to come up with 773 million unique records -- of those 140,000,000 email addresses and 10,000,000 passwords have never been seen in the HaveIBeenPwned database before."
dr tech

Update: New 25 GPU Monster Devours Passwords In Seconds | The Passwords Ledger - 0 views

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    Yikes...scary...
Ali Atakan

Finding passwords saved in Chrome is surprisingly easy, Google passwords lead sees no issue - 0 views

  • Finding passwords saved in Chrome is surprisingly easy, Google passwords lead sees no issue
dr tech

Meltdown and Spectre: 'worst ever' CPU bugs affect virtually all computers | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Serious security flaws that could let attackers steal sensitive data, including security and banking information, have been found in processors designed by Intel, AMD and ARM. The flaws, named Meltdown and Spectre, were discovered by security researchers at Google's Project Zero in conjunction with academic and industry researchers from several countries. Combined they affect virtually every modern computer, including smartphones, tablets and PCs from all vendors and running almost any operating system."
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