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dr tech

Real life CSI: Google's new AI system unscrambles pixelated faces | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Google's neural networks have achieved the dream of CSI viewers everywhere: the company has revealed a new AI system capable of "enhancing" an eight-pixel square image, increasing the resolution 16-fold and effectively restoring lost data. The neural network could be used to increase the resolution of blurred or pixelated faces, in a way previously thought impossible; a similar system was demonstrated for enhancing AI of bedrooms, agAIn creating a 32x32 pixel image from an 8x8 one."
dr tech

Techniques for reliably fooling AI machine-vision classifiers / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "The Open AI researchers were intrigued by a clAIm that self-driving cars would be intrinsically hard to fool (tricking them into sudden braking maneuvers, say), because "they capture AI from multiple scales, angles, perspectives, and the like.""
dr tech

Computers are now better than humans at recognising images | Global | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "It might not sound like much, but the success of the Minwa supercomputer, which can sort a million images into a thousand predefined categories with an error rate less than the typical human, makes it the latest secret weapon of the company known as "China's Google", Bimagesdu."
dr tech

Machine-learning photo-editor predicts what should be under your brush / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "In Neural Photo Editing With Introspective Adversarial Networks, a group of University of Edinburgh engineers and a private research colleague describe a method for using "introspective adversarial networks" to edit images in realtime, which they demonstrate in an open project called "Neural Photo Editor" that "enhances" photos by predicting what should be under your brush."
dr tech

This Person Does Not Exist Is the Best One-Off Website of 2019 | Inverse - 0 views

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    "At their core, GANs consist of two networks: the generator and discriminator. These computer programs compete against each other millions-upon-millions of times to refine their image generating skills until they're good enough to create the full-fledged pictures."
dr tech

Algorithms Identify People with Suicidal Thoughts - IEEE Spectrum - 0 views

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    "Brain scans, however, are quite telling, especially when analyzed with an algorithm, Brent and his colleagues discovered. "We're trying to figure out what's going on in somebody's brain when they're thinking about suicide," says Brent.  These scans, taken using fMRI, or functional magnetic resonance imaging, show that strong words such as 'death,' 'trouble,' 'carefree,' and 'praise,' trigger different patterns of brain activity in people who are suicidal, compared with people who are not. That means that people at risk of suicide think about those concepts differently than everyone else-evidenced by the levels and patterns of brain activity, or neural signatures."
dr tech

How funky tortoiseshell glasses can beat facial recognition | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Where the researchers struck gold was by realising that a large (but not overly large pair of glasses) could act to "change the pixels" even in a real photo. By picking a pair of "geek" frames, with relatively large rims, the researchers were able to obscure about 6.5% of the pixels in any given facial picture. Printing a pattern over those frames then had the effect of manipulating the image."
dr tech

8 Skilled Jobs That May Soon Be Replaced by Robots - 0 views

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    "Unskilled manual laborers have felt the pressure of automation for a long time - but, increasingly, they're not alone. The last few years have been a bonanza of advances in artificial intelligence. As our software gets smarter, it can tackle harder problems, which means white-collar and pink-collar workers are at risk as well. Here are eight jobs expected to be automated (partially or entirely) in the coming decades. Call Center Employees call-center Telemarketing used to happen in a crowded call center, with a group of representatives cold-calling hundreds of prospects every day. Of those, maybe a few dozen could be persuaded to buy the product in question. Today, the idea is largely the same, but the methods are far more efficient. Many of today's telemarketers are not human. In some cases, as you've probably experienced, there's nothing but a recording on the other end of the line. It may prompt you to "press '1' for more information," but nothing you say has any impact on the call - and, usually, that's clear to you. But in other cases, you may get a sales call and have no idea that you're actually speaking to a computer. Everything you say gets an appropriate response - the voice may even laugh. How is that possible? Well, in some cases, there is a human being on the other side, and they're just pressing buttons on a keyboard to walk you through a pre-recorded but highly interactive marketing pitch. It's a more practical version of those funny soundboards that used to be all the rage for prank calls. Using soundboard-assisted calling - regardless of what it says about the state of human interaction - has the potential to make individual call center employees far more productive: in some cases, a single worker will run two or even three calls at the same time. In the not too distant future, computers will be able to man the phones by themselves. At the intersection of big data, artificial intelligence, and advanced
dr tech

Flat-pack heaven? Robots master task of assembling Ikea chair | Science | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "In the meantime, Pham is keen to see if robots can learn to build the chair using only an image of the assembled product as a guide. Will the technology ever help humans who struggle with the task? "I don't think it is in Ikea's business model to have robots assemble their chairs," he said. "In the next 10 to 20 years, people will still be sweating over flat-pack furniture.""
dr tech

Scientists discover how the brain recognises faces - by reading monkey's minds | Science | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Instead, the new work shows our brains rely on the kind of maths that an algorithm might use to perform the task. In fact, Tsao and her colleague, Steven Le Chang, stumbled on their discovery while working on computer vision. The pair had initially set themselves the challenge of coming up with a way of reliably converting facial ai into a numerical representation."
dr tech

These incredibly realistic fake faces show how algorithms can now mess with us - MIT Technology Review - 0 views

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    "The researchers, Tero Karras, Samuli Laine, and Timo aila, came up with a new way of constructing a generative adversarial network, or GAN. GANs employ two dueling neural networks to train a computer to learn the nature of a data set well enough to generate convincing fakes. When applied to ai, this provides a way to generate often highly realistic fakery. The same Nvidia researchers have previously used the technique to create artificial celebrities (read our profile of the inventor of GANs, Ian Goodfellow)."
dr tech

There's a literal elephant in machine learning's room / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "FOLLOW US Twitter / Facebook / RSS Machine learning image classifiers use context clues to help understand the contents of a room, for example, if they manage to identify a dining-room table with a high degree of confidence, that can help resolve ambiguity about other objects nearby, identifying them as chairs. The downside of this powerful approach is that it means machine learning classifiers can be confounded by confusing, out-of-context elements in a scene, as is demonstrated in The Elephant in the Room, a paper from a trio of Toronto-based computer science academics."
dr tech

Are you being scanned? How facial recognition technology follows you, even as you shop | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Westfield's Smartscreen network was developed by the French software firm Quividi back in 2015. Their discreet cameras capture blurry images of shoppers and apply statistical analysis to identify audience demographics. And once the billboards have your attention they hit record, sharing your reaction with advertisers. Quividi says their billboards can distinguish shoppers' gender with 90% precision, five categories of mood from "very happy to very unhappy" and customers' age within a five-year bracket."
dr tech

Google researchers reveal automated process for removing watermarks from stock images / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition shows that these watermarks can be reliably detected and undetectably erased by software."
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