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anonymous

BBC News - NatWest online services hit by cyber attack - 0 views

  • ails safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6");
  • Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); hyper-depth-st
  • 's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); Your Savings
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • and cash machines. Details safe On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website, from which they normally access their accounts online. The RBS Group - which includes RBS, NatWest and Ulster Bank - said that NatWest was worst affected by the "deliberate" disruption. "Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today," a spokeswoman for RBS said. "This deliberate surge of traffic is commonly known as a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack. We have taken the appropriate action to restore the affected websites. At no time was there any risk to customers. We apologise for the inconvenience caused." She stressed that the latest incident was not connected to Monday's IT failure and no customer information was compromised at any time. The incident on Monday also affected cash machines and card payments and prompted an apology from the boss of the RBS group, Ross McEwan. More on This Story Big Banking Latest news EU fines banks over rate-rigging We've kept businesses alive - RBS Cable hands RBS file to watchdog Parties row over Co-op 'smears' JP Morgan in record $13bn settlement Police search home of Paul Flowers Barclays plans to cut 1,700 jobs $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-1"); Basics Funding for Lending: How does it work? Q&amp;A: Standard Chartered allegations HSBC report: Key findings Q&amp;A: Basel rules on bank capital $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-2"); Guides and analysis Shock: A banker can live on £1m salary RBS's new boss, Ross McEwan, will not receive any bonus for his first 15 months in the job, and won't pocket any bonus payments till at least 2017. When will banking ever change? Q&amp;A: Banker bonus cap plan What has changed since the crisis? Explaining the Libor scandal Timeline: Libor-fixing scandal $render("hyper-related-assets","group-title-6"); <h4 cla
  • It came less than a week after a major computer failure left some customers unable to use cards and cash machines.
  • On Friday, a number of customers reported problems getting on to the bank's website
  • Due to a surge in internet traffic deliberately directed at the NatWest website, customers experienced difficulties accessing some of our customer websites today,
dr tech

What is HTTP/2 and is it going to speed up the web? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "HTTP/2 is a more modern protocol that essentially speeds web browsing up using new ways of transporting data between the browser and server across the internet. It is backwards compatible with HTTP1.1 and uses most of the same technologies, but it is more efficient and allows servers to respond with more content than was originally requested, removing the need for the user's computer to continually send requests for more information until a website is fully loaded."
rrc123

How artificial intelligence helps firms stay relevant amid pandemic - Opinion - The Jakarta Post - 0 views

  • AI and machine learning, combined with the science of turning data into insightful information (aka data science), have become more important than ever in the “new normal” to guide innovation based on new market trends and consumer preferences
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    AI and machine learning, combined with the science of turning data into insightful information (aka data science), have become more important than ever in the "new normal" to guide innovation based on new market trends and consumer preferences This article was published in thejakartapost.com with the title "How artificial intelligence helps firms stay relevant amid pandemic - Opinion - The Jakarta Post". Click to read: https://www.thejakartapost.com/academia/2020/09/21/how-artificial-intelligence-helps-firms-stay-relevant-amid-pandemic.html. Download The Jakarta Post app for easier and faster news access: Android: http://bit.ly/tjp-android iOS: http://bit.ly/tjp-ios
dr tech

Protocols, Not Platforms: A Technological Approach to Free Speech | Knight First Amendment Institute - 0 views

  •  
    "Some have argued for much greater policing of content online, and companies like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter have talked about hiring thousands to staff up their moderation teams.8 8. April Glaser, Want a Terrible Job? Facebook and Google May Be Hiring,Slate (Jan. 18, 2018), https://slate.com/technology/2018/01/facebook-and-google-are-building-an-army-of-content-moderators-for-2018.html (explaining that major platforms have hired or have announced plans to hire thousands, in some cases more than ten thousand, new content moderators).On the other side of the coin, companies are increasingly investing in more and more sophisticated technology help, such as artificial intelligence, to try to spot contentious content earlier in the process.9 9. Tom Simonite, AI Has Started Cleaning Up Facebook, But Can It Finish?,Wired (Dec. 18, 2018), https://www.wired.com/story/ai-has-started-cleaning-facebook-can-it-finish/.Others have argued that we should change Section 230 of the CDA, which gives platforms a free hand in determining how they moderate (or how they don't moderate).10 10. Gohmert Press Release, supra note 7 ("Social media companies enjoy special legal protections under Section 230 of the Communications Act of 1934, protections not shared by other media. Instead of acting like the neutral platforms they claim to be in order obtain their immunity, these companies have turned Section 230 into a license to potentially defraud and defame with impunity… Since there still appears to be no sincere effort to stop this disconcerting behavior, it is time for social media companies to be liable for any biased and unethical impropriety of their employees as any other media company. If these companies want to continue to act like a biased medium and publish their own agendas to the detriment of others, they need to be held accountable."); Eric Johnson, Silicon Valley's Self-Regulating Days "Probably Should Be" Over, Nancy Pelosi Says, Vox (Apr. 11, 2019), https:/
dr tech

Apple and White House in new push for HTTPS connections | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Both Apple and the White House have announced new policies aimed at boosting the use of encrypted connections on the internet, suggesting that the days of insecure internet connections could be numbered."
dr tech

Firefox: 'no UK plans' to make encrypted browser tool its default | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Mozilla has announced it will make the tool, called DNS-over-HTTPS, or DoH, the default for all users in the US."
Buka Zakaraia

Every step you take: UK underground centre that is spy capital of the world | UK news | The Guardian - 0 views

  • Millions of people walk beneath the unblinking gaze of central London's surveillance cameras.
  • Westminster council's CCTV control room, where a click and swivel of a joystick delivers panoramic views of any central London street
  • Using the latest remote technology, the cameras rotate 360 degrees, 365 days a year
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • The Home Office, which funded the creation of the £1.25m facility seven years ago
  • So famed has central London's surveillance network become that figures released yesterday revealed that more than 6,000 officials from 30 countries have come to learn lessons from the centre.
  • Dean Ingledew, the council's director of community protection, said that to safeguard privacy a team of amateur auditors regularly comes to the control room, unannounced, to inspect the tapes
  • Defending the searching gaze of London's cameras, Ingledew said that people who do not look as though they are doing anything wrong will be left alone.
Buka Zakaraia

Tesco plots to conquer telecoms sector | Business | The Guardian - 0 views

  • Tesco is building up its assault on telephone and broadband firms with plans for hundreds of new in-store telecoms outlets and discounted packages of internet and landline services.
  • Bosses announced a five-year deal with Cable &amp; Wireless for it to supply Tesco with wholesale broadband services
  • It now plans to double its number of phone shops to 200 by the end of 2010
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    Is there a negative social and ethical issue - which if the 11 words?
dr tech

Facebook's content moderation a mess, employees outraged, contractors have PTSD: Reports / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Of all the disturbing parts of this @CaseyNewton piece about Facebook content reviewers -- and there are many -- the one about people slowly coming to believe the conspiracy theories sticks with me https://t.co/ulDx3PEaWa"
BOB SAGET

Defense Dept. pulls software over privacy issues | InSecurity Complex - CNET News - 0 views

Max van Mesdag

AT&T's Verizon Ad Battle: Who's Being Hurt Worse? - 1 views

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    In the United States, a vicious battle has begun between the leading companies in the 3G market. Their vicious advertising campaigns have no sign of stopping. So what will this do to sales?
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    The war continues as AT&T has lost their first legal battle again Verison for their advertisements: http://news.cnet.com/8301-30686_3-10401094-266.html?tag=newsEditorsPicksArea.0
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    Do you think this would be a good article? You suggest that reliability and authenticity are the main issues according to your tagging - make sure you explain this in your annotation...
anonymous

Find the ungoogleable with crowdsourced search engine - tech - 04 December 2013 - New Scientist - 0 views

  • THERE'S nothing like the human touch.
  • DataSift is new kind of search engine that uses crowdsourced human intelligence to answer vague, complex or visual questions, even when the users are not sure what they are searching for.
  • answered easily and quickly by human workers
anonymous

Bitcoin flaw could threaten booming virtual currency - tech - 06 November 2013 - New Scientist - 0 views

  • Bitcoin contains a hitherto unnoticed flaw which threatens to upset the balance of the $1.5 billion economy built on the virtual currency.
  • Although groups form to share computing power and split the profits, what they receive is proportional to the resources they contribute.
anonymous

Data trackers monitor your life so they can nudge you - tech - 07 November 2013 - New Scientist - 0 views

  • Once you know everything about a person, you can influence their behaviour.
  • The phones are tracking everywhere the students go, who they meet and when, and every text they send
dr tech

YouTube will temporarily increase automated content moderation | Engadget - 0 views

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    "YouTube will rely more on machine learning and less on human reviewers during the coronavirus outbreak. Normally, algorithms detect potentially harmful content and send it to human reviewers for assessment. But these are not normal times, and in an effort to reduce the need for employees and contractors to come into an office, YouTube will allow its automated system to remove some content without human review."
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