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Feudalism Pyramid - 0 views

  • Feudalism - The Pyramid of PowerThe pyramid of power which was the Feudal system ran to a strict 'pecking' order - during the Feudalism period of the Middle Ages everyone knew their place. The order of rank and precedence in the Feudalism Feudal System was as follows:The PopeThe KingNoblesKnights / VassalsFreemenYeomenServantsPeasants / Serfs / Villeins
  • Feudalism PyramidFeudalism in the Middle Ages resembles a pyramid, with the lowest peasants at its base and the lines of authority flowing up to the peak of the structure, the king. Under Feudalism the King was only answerable to the Pope. Feudalism was based on the exchange of land for military service. Life lived under the Feudalism Feudal System, or Feudalism, demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior.
  • Feudalism Pyramid - Fealty and HomageDuring the Middle Ages a portion of land called a fief would be granted by the King. This reward would be granted to him by his lord in exchange for his services. The recipient of the fief would be one of his vassals. The fief, or land, was usually granted following a Commendation Ceremony. The commendation ceremony was designed to create a lasting bond between a vassal and his lord. Fealty and homage were a key element of Feudalism.
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  • Feudalism was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished. However, under the Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope. The Pope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King. Under the Feudalism pyramid the Pope had the power to pronounce judgement against a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
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    "Yeomen"
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Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to nobles in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
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The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 7 views

  • the government provided bread, oil and wine to the people at no charge.
  • This means that people were selected for government positions because they were friends of someone in authority
  • “patron” system
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  • The father was the head of the household and had power over his wife and children.
  • Most marriages were arranged, but the children did have some say in the choice.
  • During the Imperial Period (the third period), not only did the government of Rome provide bread for the people, it also provided entertainment.
  • The Romans followed the medical care of the Greeks.
  • In the early years, there was no public education. Children learned about farming, training for war and more in their homes.
  • later years of the empire, the Romans were influenced by the Greeks and had Greek tutors teach the wealthy children about classic literature and art.
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    This a great website for feudalism and some of its rules in the Middle Ages.
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Medieval education in Europe: Schools & Universities - 0 views

  • It is estimated that by 1330, only 5% of the total population of Europe received any sort of education
  • Even then education, as we understand it, was not accessible or even desired by everyone. Schools were mostly only accessible to the sons of high lords of the land.
  • In most kingdoms in Europe, education was overseen by the church.
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  • The very fact that the curriculum was structured by the church gave it the ability to mould the students to follow its doctrine
  • Unofficially, education started from a very young age. This sort of early education depended on the feudal class of the child’s parents
  • Even the children of serfs would be taught the skills needed to survive by their parents. The boys would be taken out into the fields to observe and to help their parents with easy tasks, while the girls would work with the animals at home, in the vegetable garden with their mothers, or watch them weave.
  • Children of craftsmen and merchants were educated from a very young age in the trade of their fathers. Trade secrets rarely left a family and they had to be taught and understood by all male (and unusually, female) heirs, in order to continue the family legacy.
  • Young boys of noble birth would learn how to hunt and swing a weapon, while the young ladies of nobility would learn how to cook
  • The main subject of study in those schools was Latin (reading and writing). In addition to this, students were also taught rhetoric – the art of public speaking and persuasion – which was a very useful tool for both men of the cloth and nobles alike.
  • Lessons frequently started at sunrise and finished at sunset
  • University education, across the whole of the continent, was a luxury to which only the wealthiest and brightest could ever aspire
  • Since the creation of the first university in 1088
  • Students attended the Medieval University at different ages, ranging from 14 (if they were attending Oxford or Paris to study the Arts) to their 30s (if they were studying Law in Bologna)
  • The dynamic between students and teachers in a medieval university was significantly different from today. In the University of Bologna students hired and fired teachers by consensus. The students also bargained as a collective regarding fees, and threatened teachers with strikes if their demands were not met
  • A Master of Arts degree in the medieval education system would have taken six years; a Bachelor of Arts degree would be awarded after completing the third or fourth year. By “Arts” the degree was referring to the seven liberal arts – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric
  • The sons of the peasants could only be educated if the lord of the manor had given his permission
  • Any family caught having a son educated without permission was heavily fined
  • Historians today believe that this policy was another way in which authority figures attempted to control the peasants, since an educated peasant/villein might prove to question the way things were done and upset the balance of power which kept the nobles strong.
  • Students held the legal status of clerics which, according to the Canon Law, could not be held by women; women were therefore not admitted into universities.
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    This explains the importance of education and how each group got an education.
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http://library.thinkquest.org/10949/fief/lofeudal.html - 8 views

  • They often formed their own manorial courts, called halimotes.
  • "Noone shall enter the fields to carry grain after sunset" This law was made to prevent grain from being stolen surreptitiously.
  • The lord also had a great deal of control over his peasants, known as serfs.
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  • The people were bound to their land plots
  • The court was overseen by a representative of the lord, usually his steward.
  • They had grazing and field rights around their village.
  • They did not have right to hunt most wild game
  • . The average farmer was given a plot of land on which he could farm.
  • The kings held this land by what they believed was "divine right"
  • The barons were given a large portion of the king's land, known as fiefs or manors.
  • "shield money" was often used to maintain a somewhat regular army.
  • . The class of lords solidified into an upper nobility class.
  • Whenever a baron was granted or inherited a fief, he was made into a vassal of the king.
  • "homage and fealty"
  • During the period of history known as the Middle Ages, feudalism was the law of the land.
  • Projects by Students for Students
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    An intermediate reading level description of the Middle Ages Feudal System.
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    Huge list of Medieval Terminology and Glossary.  What is an Arrow Loop? Look here.  
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The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 3 views

  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you.
  • Fancy clothes were a status symbol. Laws were passed that forbade peasants from wearing fancy clothes, which they couldn’t afford anyway.
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  • Nobles ate rich and fancy food prepared by the servants.
  • About 20 percent of women and 5 percent of babies died during childbirth.
  • There were plenty of toys and games. Medieval children had dolls, spinning tops, rattles, hobby horses, blocks, balls, whistles and puppets. Little girls had glass jewelry for dress-up, while little boys played with wooden soldiers, whips, toy horses and wooden swords.
  • Women sewed, took care of children and ran the estate.
  • At age 7, boys were sent to another castle to begin learning to become a knight.
  • At age 7, girls were sent to another castle to learn to become a lady.
  • Marriages were never based on love. They were arranged by the parents and often involved land issues and strategic bonds.
  • Girls as young as age 12 were married to anyone who met the requirements of the girl’s parents. Grooms could be from 20 years to 50 years old.
  • Royal children learned a few manners, a little reading, writing and dancing.
  • Clothing
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    Great Thanks!
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