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Garth Holman

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 1 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      This shows that there were more than one type of monk or nun.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you. After the rank of king, the hierarchy was the nobles, the knights, the clergy (religious people), the tradesmen and the peasants.
  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
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  • profoundly affected by the rulings of the church.
  • One of the most unifying elements of the Middle Ages was the Roman Catholic Church.
  • In the Middle Ages, there was a definite structure in society.
  • Following the pope, in order of rank, there were bishops, priests, monks and nuns.
  • Bishops
  • Priests
  • Monks
  • were very holy and lived in a convent.
Garth Holman

Life in the Middle Ages - 0 views

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    Great site for quest four: All the key ideas of your social life.  USE IT. 
Cameron G.

Daily Life of a Knight in the Middle Ages - 3 views

    • Cameron G.
       
      The words highlighted in pink show the times that knights prayed. Before every meal and then before bed. This demonstrates the impact religion had on the daily life of knights.
  • prayers would be made
  • Mid morning prayers
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  • Evening prayer
  • Bedtime prayers
Swathi S

King Richard the Lionheart - 0 views

  • Richard on the Third Crusad
  • Richard on the Third Crusade
  • Richard's tactics ensured success at the siege of Acre and on the subsequent march south, Saladin's men being unable to harass the Crusader army into an impulsive action which might not have gone their way.
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  • the desertion of the French king had been a major blow, from which they could not hope to recover
  • Realising that he had no hope of holding Jerusalem even if he took it, Richard sadly ordered a retreat.
  • Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. He was often referred to as Richard the Lionheart
  • sons of Henry II
  • Richard had limited respect for his father and lacked foresight and a sense of responsibility
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    This is a really good site about King Richard the Lionhearted. It tells about his personal life and his attempts to seize Jerusalem.
Garth Holman

Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to nobles in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the Life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
Cameron G.

The Middle Ages for Kids - Common People, the Manorial System - 1 views

  • If the manor land was sold or reassigned to a new owner, the serfs stayed with the land.
  • Serfs had many jobs on the manor including craftsmen, bakers, farmers, and tax collectors
  • They had to do the job they were assigned to do. 
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  • Serfs could buy their freedom from the manor, but where would they get the money?
  • If a new lord took over the manor, he would need the serfs for labor.
  • Peasants were free to leave if they wished
  • Peasants worked the land and made the goods in exchange for protection.
  • Other than that, their life was just like a serf's life.
  • A few peasants escaped the hard work on the farm by joining the church. But most lived and died on the manor where they were born.
  • Everyone had to pay taxes to the lord
  • To pay the crop tax, some crops went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the bread tax, some bread they made went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the coat tax, some of the warm coats they made went to the lord, and some they kept.
  • Everything was paid in barter. Coinage or money did not exist on the manor. 
  • People believed that the only way to get to Heaven was to follow the teachings in the Bible.
  • The common people could not read or write.
  • The priest told them who they must marry and when. You had to do everything the priest said if you wanted to get to heaven. 
  • peasants and serfs were mostly content with their lot.
  • work kept everyone on the manor fed and comfortable, including themselves. 
  • They were not slaves. These people could not be bought and sold. But they could not leave the manor without permission.
Lauren M

Medieval Jobs - 9 views

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    All the jobs in medieval life  
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    will help with quest 4 question 4
Jenny L.

http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/year7links/life/foulfood.pdf - 1 views

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    Explains about what people ate in the Middle ages
Kevin D.

Medieval Children - Daily Life for Children in the Middle Ages - 0 views

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    A contents about Medieval Children for Quest Four
Angela W

The Middle Ages - 2 views

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    Great info on what life was like and what happened during the middle ages. Good info about travel as well.
Garth Holman

Of Monks, Medieval Scribes, and Middlemen - 0 views

  • : In the early Middle Ages, the Church played a very important role in protecting ancient works, and monks were heavily involved in the “reproduction and preservation of the literature that had been inherited from earlier writers,—writers whose works had been accepted as classics.”
  • The monks who were not yet competent to work as scribes were to be instructed by the others.”
  • The copying of books was also slow, tedious, and very time-consuming; it took years for a scribe to complete “a particularly fine manuscript with colored initials and miniature art work.”
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  • it is, therefore, no surprise that monks sometimes jotted remarks about their frustration and relief in the margins, or the colophons, of their manuscripts. Examples of these remarks included “Thin ink, bad vellum, difficult text,” “Thank God, it will soon be dark,” and “Now I’ve written the whole thing: for Christ’s sake give me a drink.”
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    A more difficult read, but explains the life of Monks, Medieval Scribes and other middlemen.  
Garth Holman

Medieval Life | HistoryOnTheNet - 1 views

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    Overview of the Middle Ages.
Garth Holman

Christian Art - 1 views

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    Medival website with topics people, castles, weapons, battles, clothing, knights, music, swords, food, life, kings, crusades, architecture, and more.
Garth Holman

History: Middle Ages Monasteries for Kids - 6 views

  • A monastery was a building, or buildings, where people lived and worshiped, devoting their time and life to God.
  • The people who lived in the monastery were called monks. The monastery was self contained, meaning everything the monks needed was provided by the monastery community. They made their own clothes and grew their own food. They had no need for the outside world. This way they could be somewhat isolated and could focus on God. There were monasteries spread throughout Europe during the Middle Ages.
  • only people in the Middle Ages who knew how to read and write. They provided education to the rest of the world.
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  • place where travelers could stay during
  • helped to feed the poor, take care of the sick, and provided education to boys in the local community.
  • day in the Middle Ages was spent praying, worshiping in church, reading the Bible, and meditating.
  • different jobs depending on their talents and interests.
  • Abbot - The Abbot was the head of the monastery or abbey.
  • A part of this vow was that they were dedicating their life to the monastery and the order of monks they were entering.
  • They were to give up worldly goods and devote their lives to God and discipline. They also took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
  • Monks and nuns were generally the most educated people during the Middle Ages. They spent much of their day in silence.
  • A scribe may spend over a year copying a long book like the Bible.
Garth Holman

Feudalism Pyramid - 0 views

  • Feudalism - The Pyramid of PowerThe pyramid of power which was the Feudal system ran to a strict 'pecking' order - during the Medieval period of the Middle Ages everyone knew their place. The order of rank and precedence in the Medieval Feudal System was as follows:The PopeThe KingNoblesKnights / VassalsFreemenYeomenServantsPeasants / Serfs / Villeins
  • Feudalism PyramidFeudalism in the Middle Ages resembles a pyramid, with the lowest peasants at its base and the lines of authority flowing up to the peak of the structure, the king. Under Feudalism the King was only answerable to the Pope. Feudalism was based on the exchange of land for military service. Life lived under the Medieval Feudal System, or Feudalism, demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior.
  • Feudalism Pyramid - Fealty and HomageDuring the Middle Ages a portion of land called a fief would be granted by the King. This reward would be granted to him by his lord in exchange for his services. The recipient of the fief would be one of his vassals. The fief, or land, was usually granted following a Commendation Ceremony. The commendation ceremony was designed to create a lasting bond between a vassal and his lord. Fealty and homage were a key element of feudalism.
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  • Feudalism was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished. However, under the Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope. The Pope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King. Under the feudalism pyramid the Pope had the power to pronounce judgement against a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
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    "Yeomen"
Jack S

The Middle Ages: Feudal Life - 2 views

shared by Jack S on 20 Dec 11 - Cached
  • or safety and for defense, people in the Middle Ages formed small communities around a central lord or master. Most people lived on a manor, which consisted of the castle, the church, the village, and the surrounding farm land. These manors were isolated, with occasional visits from peddlers, pilgrims on their way to the Crusades, or soldiers from other fiefdoms.
  • n this "feudal" system, the king awarded land grants or "fiefs" to his most important nobles, his barons, and his bishops, in return for their contribution of soldiers for the king's armies. At the lowest echelon of society were the peasants, also called "serfs" or "villeins." In exchange for living and working on his land, known as the "demesne," the lord offered his peasants protection.
    • Jack S
       
      Property Takes a big role
    • josh j
       
      Religion takes a bigger role than property I think. :)
Lauren M

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 3 views

  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you.
  • Fancy clothes were a status symbol. Laws were passed that forbade peasants from wearing fancy clothes, which they couldn’t afford anyway.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Nobles ate rich and fancy food prepared by the servants.
  • About 20 percent of women and 5 percent of babies died during childbirth.
  • There were plenty of toys and games. Medieval children had dolls, spinning tops, rattles, hobby horses, blocks, balls, whistles and puppets. Little girls had glass jewelry for dress-up, while little boys played with wooden soldiers, whips, toy horses and wooden swords.
  • Women sewed, took care of children and ran the estate.
  • At age 7, boys were sent to another castle to begin learning to become a knight.
  • At age 7, girls were sent to another castle to learn to become a lady.
  • Marriages were never based on love. They were arranged by the parents and often involved land issues and strategic bonds.
  • Girls as young as age 12 were married to anyone who met the requirements of the girl’s parents. Grooms could be from 20 years to 50 years old.
  • Royal children learned a few manners, a little reading, writing and dancing.
  • Clothing
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    Great Thanks!
Cameron G.

Guide to Life on a Medieval Manor - 0 views

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    This has a great picture that visually explains a medieval manor and it's contents. It also gives some good information. Check it out! 
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