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Garth Holman

Feudal System - 12 views

  • Feudal SystemThe Feudal System was sustained by the rights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the Feudal. They had a thousand pretexts for establishing taxes on their vassals, who were generally considered "taxable and to be worked at will." Kings and councils waived the necessity of their studying, in order to be received as bachelors of universities. If a noble was made a prisoner of war, his life was saved by his nobility, and his ransom had practically to be raised by the "villains" of his domains.
  • The Feudal System Right of Hunting
  • The Feudal System Right of Jurisdiction
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • The Feudal System Right of Safe Convoy
  • The Feudal System Right of Wearing Spurs
  • The Feudal System Rights of Knighthood
  • The Feudal System Right of having seats of honour in churches and Monuments
  • The Feudal System Right of Disinheritance
  • The Feudal System Right of common oven
  • Feudal System Rights of Treasure Trove
  • The Feudal System Right of Shipwrecks
  • The Feudal System Right of Shelter
    • Garth Holman
       
      What does the word Villains mean, as it is used here?  
  • all privileges dearest to and most valued by the nobles.
    • Garth Holman
       
      If you are not a noble, what would happen if you killed an animal on the nobles land? 
    • anonymous
       
      you would get punished
    • Garth Holman
       
      Who was the judge of in all cases on a manor? 
    • Olivia A
       
      The Lord
    • Garth Holman
       
      This right applied to what members of society? 
    • Olivia A
       
      All member of society
  • Knights had the right of receiving double rations when prisoners of war; the right of claiming a year's delay when a creditor wished to seize their land; and the right of never having to submit to torture after trial, unless they were condemned to death for the crime they had committed.
    • Garth Holman
       
      What are three rights a KNIGHT had? 
    • Sridhar U
       
      Reviving Double Rations when Prisoner of war. The right to not pay money for the land for a year. The right to have no tourture after a trail.
  • of claiming the goods of a person dying on their lands who had no direct heir. They also had the right of claiming a tax when a fief or domain changed hands.
  • the right of common oven required serfs to make use of the mill, the oven, of the lord
    • Garth Holman
       
      What did this force all peasant and serfs to do? 
  •  
    Laws and rights of the middle ages.
Garth Holman

HISTORY OF FEUDALISM - 0 views

  •  
    "The top players in feudal Europe come from a small group of people - an aristocracy, based on skill in battle, with a shared commitment to a form of Christianity (at once power-hungry and idealistic) in which the pope in Rome has special powers as God's representative on earth. As a great feudal lord with moral pretensions, holding the ring between secular sovereigns, the pope can be seen as Europe's headmaster. Bishops and abbots are part of the small feudal aristocracy, for they are mostly recruited from the noble families holding the great fiefs. Indeed bishops can often be found on the battlefield, fighting it out with with the best. As in any other context, the strongest argument in feudalism - transcending the niceties of loyalty - is naked force. The Normans in England or in Sicily rule by right of conquest, and feudal disputes are regularly resolved in battle. But feudalism also provides many varieties of justification for force. And the possession of a good justification is almost as reassuring to a knight as a good suit of armour. One excellent excuse for warfare is the approval of the church. In 1059 the pope virtually commands the Normans to attack Sicily, by giving them feudal rights over territory not as yet theirs. Similarly Rome lets it be known that the Holy See is on the side of William when he invades England in 1066. Another important form of justification is a dynastic claim to a territory. Generations of marriages, carefully arranged for material gain, result in an immensely complex web of relationships - reflected often in kingdoms of very surprising shape on the map of Europe.
Garth Holman

Feudalism Pyramid - 0 views

  • Feudalism - The Pyramid of PowerThe pyramid of power which was the Feudal system ran to a strict 'pecking' order - during the Medieval period of the Middle Ages everyone knew their place. The order of rank and precedence in the Medieval Feudal System was as follows:The PopeThe KingFeudalKnights / VassalsFreemenYeomenServantsPeasants / Serfs / Villeins
  • Feudalism PyramidFeudalism in the Middle Ages resembles a pyramid, with the lowest peasants at its base and the lines of authority flowing up to the peak of the structure, the king. Under Feudalism the King was only answerable to the Pope. Feudalism was based on the exchange of land for military service. Life lived under the Medieval Feudal System, or Feudalism, demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior.
  • Feudalism Pyramid - Fealty and HomageDuring the Middle Ages a portion of land called a fief would be granted by the King. This reward would be granted to him by his lord in exchange for his services. The recipient of the fief would be one of his vassals. The fief, or land, was usually granted following a Commendation Ceremony. The commendation ceremony was designed to create a lasting bond between a vassal and his lord. Fealty and homage were a key element of Feudalism.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Feudalism was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished. However, under the Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope. The Pope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King. Under the Feudalism pyramid the Pope had the power to pronounce judgement against a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
  •  
    "Yeomen"
km21dcs

Feudal System - 1 views

  • prisoner of war, his life was saved by his nobility, and his ransom had practically to be raised by the "villains" of his domains.
    • Garth Holman
       
      So, Nobles would not be killed and the people below in the social class had to raise money to pay his ransom.  Sweet deal, if you are a noble. 
  • The Feudal System Right of Hunting
  • privileges dearest to and most valued by the nobles.
  • ...16 more annotations...
    • Garth Holman
       
      With the Right of Hunting: What would peasants not have access to in their diet? 
    • Gilmore Dashon
       
      Maybe meat
    • Austin David
       
      Meat
    • Dakota Houston
       
      Meat
    • Luke Jennings Sanders
       
      Meat
    • Tolga Cavusoglu
       
      meat
    • Maximilian Uhlir
       
      meat
    • Teren Landis
       
      Meat
    • Alexander Johnson
       
      Meat
  • Feudal System Right of Jurisdiction
  • which gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains, had no appeal save to the King himself.
  • The Feudal System Right of Safe Convoy
  • that it even applied itself to the lower orders, and its violation was considered the most odious crime.
  • The Feudal System Right of Wearing Spurs
  • privileges that of wearing spurs of silver or gold according to their rank of knighthood
  • Feudal System Rights of Knighthood
  • Knights had the right of receiving double rations when prisoners of war; the right of claiming a year's delay when a creditor wished to seize their land; and the right of never having to submit to torture after trial, unless they were condemned to death for the crime they had committed.
  • Feudal System Right of having seats of honour in churches and Monuments
  • Feudal System Right of Disinheritance
  • The nobles enjoyed also the right of disinheritance, that is to say, of claiming the goods of a person dying on their lands who had no direct heir
  • Feudal System Right of Shelter
  • The right of shelter, was the principal charge imposed upon the noble. When a great baron visited his lands, his tenants were not only obliged to give him and his followers shelter, but also provisions and food, the nature and quality of which were all arranged beforehand with the most extraordinary detail.
  • The Feudal System was sustained by the rights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the Feudal.
  • villains
    • km21dcs
       
      This is a type of Peasant. Meaning Peasants weren't allowed to hunt
Garth Holman

Feudal Justice - 1 views

  • it was also a system of local justice.
  • right of jurisdiction gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains and had no appeal but the King himself.
  • Knights, barons, and dukes had their separate courts, and the king had his court above all.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • Since most wrongs could be atoned for by the payment of a fine
    • Garth Holman
       
      Does this mean that Nobles used the "courts" as a way to make money? 
  • he court did not act in the public interest, as with us, but waited until the plaintiff requested service. Moreover, until the case had been decided, the accuser and the accused received the same treatment. Both were imprisoned; and the plaintiff who lost his case suffered the same penalty which the defendant, had he been found guilty, would have undergone.
  • not require the accuser to prove his case by calling witnesses and having them give testimony. The burden of proof lay on the accused, who had to clear himself of the charge,
  • Feudal Justice - The Ordeals
  • Ordeals, however, formed a method of appealing to God, the results of which could be immediately observed.
  • A form of trial which especially appealed to the warlike nobles was the judicial duel - a trial by combat. The accuser and the accused fought with each other; and the conqueror won the case. God, it was believed, would give victory to the innocent party, because he had right on his side.
  •  
    How did justice work in Feudal Europe?  Did they have Police? Courts? Rights? 
Garth Holman

Microsoft Word - Medieval People.doc.pdf - 1 views

  • Kings needed the good will and support of the Nobles and Knights so they granted them lands in return for their military services. The Nobles and Knights would in turn grant some of their lands to Freemen. Life lived under the Medieval Nobles System demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior. Everyone was expected to pay for the land by providing the following services:
  • Medieval Castle was governed by the pyramid-shaped Feudal System. This was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished.
  • land belonged to God
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • Divine Right,
  • ope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King.
  • Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope.
  • a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
  • The King claimed ownership of the land
  • these nobles then pledged their loyalty by swearing to serve and protect the king
  • military men (the knights) who were called vassals
  • The land was worked by the peasants or serfs. They belonged to the land and could not leave without permission - the bottom of the Feudalism pyramid.
Garth Holman

Medieval Civilization: Lecture Notes - 2 views

  • Feudalism and Manorialism
  • The noble class developed a value system (later called chivalry)
  • Three-field system was used, with one field planted in the autumn, one in the spring, and one fallow.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Power and prestige of the noble class based on land (the fief)
  • feudalism was a political arrangement that provided for the performance of these functions of government by a class of landed feudal.  feudal bound by an interdependent system of personal ties; the heart was the feudal contract, which established relations between lord and vassal, the most important of which were protection and service.
  • knights were to be Christian, brave, faithful, generous, and protective of women and the poor; evidence of this code may be found the French epic The Song of Roland and the Spanish El Cid.
  • which supported the lord, his family, and his soldiers.  Landed estate organized as manors; each a self-supporting economic unit; the lord provided the land and protection; serfs provided the labor.
  • Serfs (=landless peasants) bound to the soil; could not be bought or sold individually; they passed new owners when land changed hands.  Medieval farming methods primitive; yield was low
  •  
    Scroll about one-third of the way down, and you can find a great diagram of how the feudal system works. There is also a map of what a fief would look like. I highlighted where they have some information on feudalism and manorialism.
Garth Holman

Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to Feudal in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
Garth Holman

Castles in Medieval Times - 0 views

  •      Large stone castles were built in Europe from about the 1100’s to about the 1500’s. These huge buildings served not only to defend the country from foreign invaders but as the basic tool in preserving the king’s and the nobles’ power over the land. The social system was very rigid in the Middle Ages.
  • Under Feudalism, the basic social structure in this time, all land was held by the king. The king gave pieces of this land to various high Feudal, in return for their help in fighting his wars or in putting down rebellions. Not only did the higher Feudal have to fight for the king themselves, they had to supply a certain number of lesser lords and other knights to help fight also. These higher Feudal then gave some of their land to lesser knights, in return for their help in battle. Below all the knights were the serfs, who actually farmed the land. They gave a portion of their crops each year to the lord who ruled over them, in return for use of the land and protection.
  • castles as symbols of their power for all to see.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • A man’s son inherited his lands and his obligations to fight
  • The castle was both a residence for the lord and his family, and a fortification. It was a strong place for the lord to defend himself against his enemies (and the king’s enemies, and his overlord’s enemies), a safe place for him and his knights to return to, and a place to live which emphasized his power.
  •   Castles were built to keep out enemies. When an attack was expected, the drawbridge was raised, the gates and portcullis were closed, and archers were stationed on the towers.
  • The walls were not only high, in a well-planned castle, but they were arranged as much as possible so that anyone climbing the walls could be shot at from two directions.
  • The castle’s defenses invited a great deal of ingenuity from the attackers. Rolling wooden towers, covered with thick hides to stop arrows and kept wet so they could not be set on fire, were brought up to the walls in an attack. Sometimes they even worked. Catapults threw heavy stones at the walls to make a breach or loads of rocks (or diseased livestock, or fire bombs) over the walls. The battering ram—generally used against a door—was an old favorite.
  • he knights and their servants and their mounts all had to eat, as did the lord, his family, and his servants and officials, and their families. Many castles grew certain types of food inside their walls, to add variety to the diet of those inside the castle, but it was not nearly enough to feed the people in the castle, much less their guests. Castles might have beehives, herb gardens, fruit trees or a fishpond. Because the land inside the castle walls was not enough to feed all these people, they got their food from the peasants who farmed outside, and from hunting. There were restrictions on hunting by the peasants, and sometimes it was forbidden entirely, so that the lord and his retainers would have plenty of game to hunt. Hunting was also a major recreation for the lord and his men.
Jack S

The Middle Ages: Feudal Life - 2 views

shared by Jack S on 20 Dec 11 - Cached
  • or safety and for defense, people in the Middle Ages formed small communities around a central lord or master. Most people lived on a manor, which consisted of the castle, the church, the village, and the surrounding farm land. These manors were isolated, with occasional visits from peddlers, pilgrims on their way to the Crusades, or soldiers from other fiefdoms.
  • n this "feudal" system, the king awarded land grants or "fiefs" to his most important feudal, his barons, and his bishops, in return for their contribution of soldiers for the king's armies. At the lowest echelon of society were the peasants, also called "serfs" or "villeins." In exchange for living and working on his land, known as the "demesne," the lord offered his peasants protection.
    • Jack S
       
      Property Takes a big role
    • josh j
       
      Religion takes a bigger role than property I think. :)
Garth Holman

Medieval education in Europe: Schools & Universities - 0 views

  • It is estimated that by 1330, only 5% of the total population of Europe received any sort of education
  • Even then education, as we understand it, was not accessible or even desired by everyone. Schools were mostly only accessible to the sons of high lords of the land.
  • In most kingdoms in Europe, education was overseen by the church.
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • The very fact that the curriculum was structured by the church gave it the ability to mould the students to follow its doctrine
  • Unofficially, education started from a very young age. This sort of early education depended on the feudal class of the child’s parents
  • Even the children of serfs would be taught the skills needed to survive by their parents. The boys would be taken out into the fields to observe and to help their parents with easy tasks, while the girls would work with the animals at home, in the vegetable garden with their mothers, or watch them weave.
  • Children of craftsmen and merchants were educated from a very young age in the trade of their fathers. Trade secrets rarely left a family and they had to be taught and understood by all male (and unusually, female) heirs, in order to continue the family legacy.
  • Young boys of noble birth would learn how to hunt and swing a weapon, while the young ladies of nobility would learn how to cook
  • The main subject of study in those schools was Latin (reading and writing). In addition to this, students were also taught rhetoric – the art of public speaking and persuasion – which was a very useful tool for both men of the cloth and nobles alike.
  • Lessons frequently started at sunrise and finished at sunset
  • University education, across the whole of the continent, was a luxury to which only the wealthiest and brightest could ever aspire
  • Since the creation of the first university in 1088
  • Students attended the Medieval University at different ages, ranging from 14 (if they were attending Oxford or Paris to study the Arts) to their 30s (if they were studying Law in Bologna)
  • The dynamic between students and teachers in a medieval university was significantly different from today. In the University of Bologna students hired and fired teachers by consensus. The students also bargained as a collective regarding fees, and threatened teachers with strikes if their demands were not met
  • A Master of Arts degree in the medieval education system would have taken six years; a Bachelor of Arts degree would be awarded after completing the third or fourth year. By “Arts” the degree was referring to the seven liberal arts – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric
  • The sons of the peasants could only be educated if the lord of the manor had given his permission
  • Any family caught having a son educated without permission was heavily fined
  • Historians today believe that this policy was another way in which authority figures attempted to control the peasants, since an educated peasant/villein might prove to question the way things were done and upset the balance of power which kept the nobles strong.
  • Students held the legal status of clerics which, according to the Canon Law, could not be held by women; women were therefore not admitted into universities.
  •  
    This explains the importance of education and how each group got an education.
Shira H

Effects of the Crusades - 0 views

    • Shira H
       
      Great site for quest 8. Has lots of information on the effects of the Crusades. 
  • Many of the nobles who set out on the expeditions never returned, and their estates, through failure of heirs, escheated to the Crown; while many more wasted their fortunes in meeting the expenses of their undertaking.
  • The role, wealth and power of the Catholic ChurchPolitical effects Effects of the Crusades on CommerceEffects of the Crusades on FeudalismSocial development Intellectual development Social Effects of the CrusadesEffects of the Crusades - Intellectual Development
Lauren M

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 3 views

  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you.
  • Fancy clothes were a status symbol. Laws were passed that forbade peasants from wearing fancy clothes, which they couldn’t afford anyway.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Nobles ate rich and fancy food prepared by the servants.
  • About 20 percent of women and 5 percent of babies died during childbirth.
  • There were plenty of toys and games. Medieval children had dolls, spinning tops, rattles, hobby horses, blocks, balls, whistles and puppets. Little girls had glass jewelry for dress-up, while little boys played with wooden soldiers, whips, toy horses and wooden swords.
  • Women sewed, took care of children and ran the estate.
  • At age 7, boys were sent to another castle to begin learning to become a knight.
  • At age 7, girls were sent to another castle to learn to become a lady.
  • Marriages were never based on love. They were arranged by the parents and often involved land issues and strategic bonds.
  • Girls as young as age 12 were married to anyone who met the requirements of the girl’s parents. Grooms could be from 20 years to 50 years old.
  • Royal children learned a few manners, a little reading, writing and dancing.
  • Clothing
  •  
    Great Thanks!
Garth Holman

Intro to the Medieval Era - 1 views

  • The Medieval Era, often called The Middle Ages or the Dark Ages, began just before 500 A.D. following a great loss of power throughout Europe by the Roman Emperor. The Middle Ages span roughly 1,000 years, ending around 1450 A.D. (Medieval actually means "Middle"!) In The Middle Ages people were busy: Building great Cathedrals as there was a huge rise in Christianity Building Great castles for local nobility Clearing large tracts of land by peasants and slaves for their Lords and Kings New towns and villages were popping up all over Europe
  • esulting in the foundation of many of today's modern European countries.
  • For safety and for defense, people formed small communities around a central Lord or Master. Most lived on a Manor, which consisted of the Castle, the Church, the Village, and the surrounding Farm Land. These Manors were isolated, with only occasional visits from peddlers or pilgrims on their way to the Crusades or soldiers from other fiefdoms (kingdoms).
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Feudalism ~ The King awarded land grants to his most important Feudal, like Barons and Bishops, in return for their contribution of soldiers for the King's armies. Lords could have a variety of other official titles including Earl, Marquis or Viscount. Lords did more than fund wars. They were the local justice and held court for local matters. Lords provided some of their land to Vassals, or tenants who were a somewhat higher class than peasants. Vassals were required to serve guard duty, and later they paid a fee to acquire mercenaries (soldiers-for-hire).  At the lowest class of society were the Peasants, also called "serfs" or "villeins." Peasants provided the Lord with labor or a share of the produce or livestock yielded from his lands in exchange for protection, land to work and a place to live.
  •  
    This page of the site is good.
tdowd t

How Feudalism Works - 0 views

  • Mind Your Manors   In the days of decentralized government, a fief was like its own mini country that produced pretty much everything that was needed from food to weapons to tools. At the heart of a lord's fief was the manor-large estates. The manor was where the lord's family, servants, and his knights lived. At first they began as large houses, but over the years became full castles as walls, towers, and moats were added for protection. Manors were always in the country and surrounded by farmland and woods. Some of the wealthier lords even had more than one manor.   A manor was the center of the community. Not only did it serve as a place for peasants to run to in times of war, but was the political center as well. When he wasn't out fighting for his Lord, the lord of a fief would act as a judge in settling disputes. He also appointed officials who would collect taxes and rent from the peasants and townspeople. Large manors had their own churches complete with their own clergy, as well as a marketplace where locals could buy and sell goods. At any time one time, hundreds of people from priests, knights, squires, entertainers, merchants, peasants, and visiting nobles would head to the manor.   For the Lady of the manor her day was spent overseeing servants & caring for the children. When her husband was away (or killed in battle) the Lady of the manor assumed the same roles her husband did, appointing officials and acting as judge. In the early Middle Ages a woman owning property was not all that uncommon.
  • Living in a castle might sound romantic but it's not all that it was cracked up to be. Medieval manors were built of wood and stone and built on a large scale. Glass was rare and extremely expensive so windows often were either left open or covered with cloth during the winter. The only means of heating a manor was the fireplace. Each major room had its own. The Great Room, which as its name implies was the center of manor life.  The Great Room was heated and lit by an enormous fireplace, big enough to stand in. The Great Room was where all of the eating, drinking, debating, politicking, and merry making and other business was conducted. Speaking of doing business, how did medieval people use the bathroom? All manor houses had privies either outside or inside the castle. The ones inside were nothing more than a seat that emptied directly into the moat. ​ To modern observers manors would have been filthy places. Fleas were common and the smell of hundreds of unwashed people (who often only bathed once a week) would have pervaded. Rats and mice also would have been running around as food was thrown directly on the floor during meal times. At night the servants swept the floor and rushes (dried river reeds) would be spread on the floor and all minor visitors and knights would bed down. The manor was often dark, cold, and smoky. To liven things up a bit, tapestries would be commissioned to decorate the walls.
Garth Holman

World-History | Medieval Knights - 1 views

  • Knights might have been professional soldiers but that didn't mean they had to act like one. In the early days of feudalism, knights often ate at the same table as the lords and ladies of the manor
  • They often belched, spit, and put their feet directly on the dinner table. The refined ladies and lords were appalled. So, a code of honor was drawn up that we now call Chivalry.
    • Garth Holman
       
      So Chivalry comes as a way to correct their personal bad behavior. 
  • This stems from the Medieval Knights Code of Chivalry and the Vows of Knighthood.
  • ...12 more annotations...
  • There were at least 17 rules to the knights code of chivalry and vows of knighthood. The most important were to serve God, serve their liege lord (the King), be courteous to all women (though what they meant was all women of the noble class), and to defend the weak. Other rules included to fight for the welfare of all, to live by honor and glory, and to refrain from the wanton giving of offence; basically, don’t act like ye olde arse.
    • Garth Holman
       
      Rules for the knight to follow. 
  • this was meant to defend the elderly, women and children, but of the upper class. Knights were often brutal to peasants and it was considered acceptable because of the low social status of the peasants. 
    • Garth Holman
       
      Poor Peasants? 
  • From this, came rules like if a woman was of equal or higher status, he should stand when she enters a room and sit only after she does, the best foods at a meal should be offered to her, and when walking on the sidewalk, the man should walk closest to the street. This was to protect the woman from getting spattered with mud and the contents of chamber pots (buckets that were used as toilets) that were thrown out windows. It was a way to show that the gentleman honored the woman to have the poop hit him instead.
  • nights kept their skills sharp by competing in tournaments known as jousts where two heavily armored horseman race at another at high speed
  • Medieval tournaments brought knights and lords together in friendly competitions to show off their skills at hand to hand combat, horse back riding, and of course, jousting
  • A head shot for example was the most damaging but also the most difficult target, and therefore was awarded the most points.
  • Cash prizes, called a purse, would be given to the winners and this was the best way to move up the social ladder if you didn't get a chance to show off your skills on the battle field. 
    • Garth Holman
       
      Maybe you can win the "PURSE" in your blog! 
  • To become a knight was a long and difficult path.
  • sent to live in the castle with his Lord where his training would begin around the age of seven
  • road to knighthood he was known as a page. A page's training involved learning to ride a horse and receiving religious instruction from the priest of the manor. And, when he wasn't riding or praying, a page spent his days running errands and serving the ladies of the manor. He would also be taught to dance, sing, and play a musical instrument which were considered honorable qualities for a knight to have.
  • a page would be promoted to the role of squire. A squire worked directly with his knight. The squire learned skills from his knight (who was also his Lord) such as sword fighting and hand to hand combat. The squire pretty much acted as personal assistant to his knight, polishing his armor, caring for his horse, and even waiting on him at meal times. During times of battle, it was the job of the squire to help his Lord into the armor and look after him if he was wounded. He also had the awful task of cleaning out the armor which, after a long day on the battle field would be covered in all sorts of bodily fluids.
    • Garth Holman
       
      Like pee He he!
  • "I promise on my faith that I will in the future be faithful to the lord, never cause him harm and will observe my homage to him completely against all persons in good faith and without deceit." -A Typical Oath of Fealty
    • Garth Holman
       
      NOTE: loyalty, homage, never cause harm, good faith.  You had to be a trustworthy to be a knigh! 
  •  
    Learn how a Knight becomes a knight and how Chivalry impacts you!
Garth Holman

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 2 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      This shows that there were more than one type of monk or nun.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you. After the rank of king, the hierarchy was the nobles, the knights, the clergy (religious people), the tradesmen and the peasants.
  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • profoundly affected by the rulings of the church.
  • One of the most unifying elements of the Middle Ages was the Roman Catholic Church.
  • In the Middle Ages, there was a definite structure in society.
  • Following the pope, in order of rank, there were bishops, priests, monks and nuns.
  • Bishops
  • Priests
  • Monks
  • were very holy and lived in a convent.
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