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dcs-armstrong

Checks and Balances - 0 views

    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Constitution is the United States version of "Civil Law" 
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Constitution is the United States version of "Civil Law" 
  • hat was an important decision because it gave specific powers to each branch and set up something called checks and balances.
  • point of checks and balances was to make sure no one branch would be able to control too much power, and it created a separation of powers
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • some examples of how the different branches work together:
  • legislative branch makes laws
  • President in the executive branch can veto those laws
  • legislative branch makes laws
  • judicial branch can declare those laws unconstitutional.
  • President in the executive branch can veto a law,
  • legislative branch can override that veto with enough votes.
  • egislative branch has the power to approve Presidential nominations
  • control the budget
  • and can impeach the President and remove him or her from office.
  • executive branch can declare Executive Orders, which are like proclamations that carry the force of law
  • judicial branch can declare those acts unconstitutional.
  • judicial branch interprets laws
  • President nominates Supreme Court justices,
  • who make the evaluations.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Judicial branch interprets laws, but the President appoints Supreme Court Justices (judges). The judges that the President appoints are the people who interpret the law.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Judicial branch interprets laws, but the President appoints Supreme Court Justices (judges). The judges that the President appoints are the people who interpret the law.
  • judicial branch interprets laws
  • enate in the legislative branch confirms the President’s nominations for judicial positions
  • Congress can impeach any of those judges and remove them from office
  • Constitution divided the Government into three branches
dcs-armstrong

3 Branches of Government for Kids and Teachers - FREE Lesson Plans & Games for Kids - 0 views

    • dcs-armstrong
       
      When they say the Legislative branch "makes new laws" what they really mean is that the Legislative branch makes suggestions on what new laws should be. These suggestions are called "bills" it doesn't officially become a law until it goes through the entire process.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      When they say the Legislative branch "makes new laws" what they really mean is that the Legislative branch makes suggestions on what new laws should be. These suggestions are called "bills" it doesn't officially become a law until it goes through the entire process.
  • he men who wrote the Constitution wanted to make sure that no one branch became too powerful
  • checks and balances
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • president is the commander in chief
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      (He commands the army)
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      (He commands the army)
  • BUT - the president cannot get
  • money to pay anyone
  • without the approval of Congress.
  • nearly everyone appointed by the president
  • pproved by Congress before they can take office.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Think what vocabulary word describes the first line "The government of the United States is composed of three branches".
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Think what vocabulary word describes the first line "The government of the United States is composed of three branches".
  • judicial branch
  • three branches
  • egislative branch
  • executive branch
  • executive branch sees that laws are carried out
  • legislative branch makes new laws
  • judicial branch makes sure that the laws
  • agree with the Constitution
Garth Holman

Feudal Justice - 1 views

  • it was also a system of local justice.
  • right of jurisdiction gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains and had no appeal but the King himself.
  • Knights, barons, and dukes had their separate courts, and the king had his court above all.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • Since most wrongs could be atoned for by the payment of a fine
    • Garth Holman
       
      Does this mean that Nobles used the "courts" as a way to make money? 
  • he court did not act in the public interest, as with us, but waited until the plaintiff requested service. Moreover, until the case had been decided, the accuser and the accused received the same treatment. Both were imprisoned; and the plaintiff who lost his case suffered the same penalty which the defendant, had he been found guilty, would have undergone.
  • not require the accuser to prove his case by calling witnesses and having them give testimony. The burden of proof lay on the accused, who had to clear himself of the charge,
  • Feudal Justice - The Ordeals
  • Ordeals, however, formed a method of appealing to God, the results of which could be immediately observed.
  • A form of trial which especially appealed to the warlike nobles was the judicial duel - a trial by combat. The accuser and the accused fought with each other; and the conqueror won the case. God, it was believed, would give victory to the innocent party, because he had right on his side.
  •  
    How did justice work in Feudal Europe?  Did they have Police? Courts? Rights? 
Garth Holman

Feudal Justice - 6 views

  • Feudal Justice - Judicial Administration
  • Feudalism - A system of Feudal Justice
  • Feudal Justice - The Oath
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • Feudal Justice - The Ordeals
  • Feudal Justice - The Judicial Duel
  • The law followed in a feudal court was largely based on old Germanic customs. The court did not act in the public interest, as with us, but waited until the plaintiff requested service. Moreover, until the case had been decided, the accuser and the accused received the same treatment. Both were imprisoned; and the plaintiff who lost his case suffered the same penalty which the defendant, had he been found guilty, would have undergone.
  • The burden of proof lay on the accused, who had to clear himself of the charge, if he could do so.
  • Ordeals, however, formed a method of appealing to God, the results of which could be immediately observed. A common form of ordeal was by fire. The accused walked barefoot over live brands, or stuck his hand into a flame, or carried a piece of red-hot iron for a certain distance. In the ordeal by hot water he plunged his arm into boiling water. A man established his innocence through one of these tests, if the wound healed properly after three days. The ordeal by cold water rested on the belief that pure water would reject the criminal. Hence the accused was thrown bound into a stream: if he floated he was guilty; if he sank he was innocent and had to be rescued. Though a crude method of securing justice, ordeals were doubtless useful in many instances. The real culprit would often prefer to confess, rather than incur the anger of God by submitting to the test and ordeals.
  • a trial by combat.
  •  
    How the justice system worked in the middle ages.
  • ...1 more comment...
  •  
    nice sight
  •  
    sorry site the site helped me with answers in the blogs but i probably didn't read enough still studying!
  •  
    This talks about the individual rights of people
morgan m

Slavery in ancient Greece - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

  • Slavery was common practice and an integral component of ancient Greece throughout its rich history, as it was in other societies of the time including ancient Israel and early Christian societies.[2][3][4] It is estimated that in Athens, the majority of citizens owned at least one slave. Most ancient writers considered slavery not only natural but necessary, but some isolated debate began to appear, notably in Socratic dialogues while the Stoics produced the first condemnation of slavery recorded in history.[4]
  • From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search Funerary stele of Mnesarete; a young servant (left) is facing her dead mistress.[1] Attica, circa 380 BC. (Glyptothek, Munich, Germany) Slavery was common practice and an integral component of ancient Greece throughout its rich history, as it was in other societies of the time including ancient Israel and early Christian societies.[2][3][4] It is estimated that in Athens, the majority of citizens owned at least one slave. Most ancient writers considered slavery not only natural but necessary, but some isolated debate began to appear, notably in Socratic dialogues while the Stoics produced the first condemnation of slavery recorded in history.[4] In conformity with modern historiographical practice, this article will discuss only chattel (personal possession) slavery, as opposed to dependent groups such as the penestae of Thessaly or the Spartan helots, who were more like medieval serfs (an enhancement to real estate). The chattel slave is an individual deprived of liberty and forced to submit to an owner who may buy, sell, or lease him or her like any other chattel.
  • The study of slavery in ancient Greece poses a number of significant methodological problems. Documentation is disjointed and very fragmented, focusing on the city of Athens. No treatise is specifically devoted to the subject. Judicial pleadings of the 4th century BC were interested in slavery only as a source of revenue. Comedy and tragedy represented stereotypes. Iconography made no substantial differentiation between slave and craftsman.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  •  From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation , search Funerary stele of Mnesarete ; a young servant (left) is facing her dead mistress. [1] Attica, circa 380 BC. (Glyptothek, Munich, Germany) Slavery was common practice and an integral component of ancient Greece throughout its rich history, as it was in other societies of the time including ancient Israel and early Christian societies.[2][3][4] It is estimated that in Athens, the majority of citizens owned at least one slave. Most ancient writers considered slavery not only natural but necessary, but some isolated debate began to appear, notably in Socratic dialogues while the Stoics produced the first condemnation of slavery recorded in history.[4] In conformity with modern historiographical practice, this article will discuss only chattel (personal possession) slavery, as opposed to dependent groups such as the penestae of Thessaly or the Spartan helots, who were more like medieval serfs (an enhancement to real estate). The chattel slave is an individual deprived of liberty and forced to submit to an owner who may buy, sell, or lease him or her like any other chattel.
  • Jump to: navigation , search Funerary stele of Mnesarete ; a young servant (left) is facing her dead mistress. [1] Attica , circa 380 BC. ( Glyptothek , Munich , Germany ) Slavery
  •  
    Article on ancient greece and its a featured wiki page! (That means its reliable)
Garth Holman

This dissident poet says elections and the nuclear pact give him hope for Iran | Public Radio International - 0 views

  • The 44-year-old journalist and poet might have ended up dead, like some of his writer friends back home in Iran. Several of them were murdered in a series of political assassinations that began in the late 1990s.
  • freedom of expression, the Islamic Republic of Iran is among the worst of the worst. The country is ranked 169th, out of a total of 180 countries, on the 2016 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters Without Borders.
  • Rafizadeh looks every bit the intellectual — glasses, leather jacket, cigarette. As a child, he would wake up early and recite Persian poetry out loud, annoying his father and his siblings. 
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • “The [Iranian] government intrudes into your personal life no matter who you are. That’s why, after the murders started happening, I decided to write political poems,” he says. 
  • “Other intellectuals were killed, too,” he says. “The Iranian regime was murdering innocent people just because they dared to call for political change and reform.” 
  • afizadeh managed to shine a light on the killings with his writings in the pages of pro-reformist newspapers. But only for a time. Eventually, Rafizadeh was arrested.“I spent 86 days in a cell that was 1.5 meters by 2 meters,” Rafizadeh says. “And I was tortured.” 
  • Even after he was released, pending trial, he says authorities threatened to harm his children if he didn’t make public statements saying he was treated well in prison and that his past writings were false.
  • Rafizadeh says he did what he was being pressured to do. But he adds that, “the Iranian public knew who was lying and who was telling the truth.” “Other journalists besides me wrote about the human rights situation in Iran and we did have an impact,” Rafizadeh says. Nonetheless, he felt he had to leave the country after the courts sentenced him to 20 lashes and nine months in prison. He escaped into Turkey in 2005. Two years later, he got asylum in Canada. 
  • “But, as it happened, there is in Iran what you might call a ‘deep state.’” 
  • None of these political actors are entirely answerable to Iran’s elected government. That enabled the hardliners to launch a brutal crackdown against the pro-reform camp of then-president Mohammad Khatami and his supporters. The crackdown began in in the late '90s and continued into the early 2000s.
  • “You can fight for rights and freedoms in the political space all you like, but if there is not judicial protection of them, that is a fundamental problem,” she says. 
  •  
    Dissident and actions in the modern world. 
ca21dcs

A History of "Trial By Ordeal" | Mental Floss - 0 views

  • “trial by fire” was a much more literal term, and was one of the many categories of “trial by ordeal” that permeated the judicial system of Europe, Asia, Africa, and colonial America.
  • the gods intervene and show a sign that indicates guilt or innocence.
    • Garth Holman
       
      Who protected you during ordeals? 
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • The defendant on trial must pick an object out from within flames, or walk over hot coals. If they were burned in the process, they were presumed guilty.
  • A one-pound iron was heated in a fire, and pulled out during a ritual prayer. The defendant had to carry this iron the length of nine feet (as measured by the defendant’s own foot size). Their hands were then examined for burns
    • Garth Holman
       
      Nobles also had Trial by Battle!  A little more just. Strongest wins.  
  • thought behind trial by ordeal was that,
  • thought behind trial by ordeal was that,
km21dcs

Feudal System - 1 views

  • prisoner of war, his life was saved by his nobility, and his ransom had practically to be raised by the "villains" of his domains.
    • Garth Holman
       
      So, Nobles would not be killed and the people below in the social class had to raise money to pay his ransom.  Sweet deal, if you are a noble. 
  • The Feudal System Right of Hunting
  • privileges dearest to and most valued by the nobles.
  • ...16 more annotations...
    • Garth Holman
       
      With the Right of Hunting: What would peasants not have access to in their diet? 
    • Gilmore Dashon
       
      Maybe meat
    • Austin David
       
      Meat
    • Dakota Houston
       
      Meat
    • Luke Jennings Sanders
       
      Meat
    • Tolga Cavusoglu
       
      meat
    • Maximilian Uhlir
       
      meat
    • Teren Landis
       
      Meat
    • Alexander Johnson
       
      Meat
  • Feudal System Right of Jurisdiction
  • which gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains, had no appeal save to the King himself.
  • The Feudal System Right of Safe Convoy
  • that it even applied itself to the lower orders, and its violation was considered the most odious crime.
  • The Feudal System Right of Wearing Spurs
  • privileges that of wearing spurs of silver or gold according to their rank of knighthood
  • Feudal System Rights of Knighthood
  • Knights had the right of receiving double rations when prisoners of war; the right of claiming a year's delay when a creditor wished to seize their land; and the right of never having to submit to torture after trial, unless they were condemned to death for the crime they had committed.
  • Feudal System Right of having seats of honour in churches and Monuments
  • Feudal System Right of Disinheritance
  • The nobles enjoyed also the right of disinheritance, that is to say, of claiming the goods of a person dying on their lands who had no direct heir
  • Feudal System Right of Shelter
  • The right of shelter, was the principal charge imposed upon the noble. When a great baron visited his lands, his tenants were not only obliged to give him and his followers shelter, but also provisions and food, the nature and quality of which were all arranged beforehand with the most extraordinary detail.
  • The Feudal System was sustained by the rights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the nobles.
  • villains
    • km21dcs
       
      This is a type of Peasant. Meaning Peasants weren't allowed to hunt
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