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Contents contributed and discussions participated by dcs-armstrong

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The Middle Ages - 4 views

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http://abpischools.org.uk/res/coResourceImport/resources04/history/history5.cfm - 0 views

  • fall of the Roman Empire meant that many of their public hygiene practices were soon lost
  • middle ages in Europe saw most people without access to clean drinking water, regular bathing or a sewage system. This meant that health conditions were often worse than during the Roman occupation of earlier centuries. Most people were farmers and food was not as plentiful as today. Starvation and disease were common.
  • Medicine in the middle ages was dominated by religion
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • punishment from God for sins committed and the only way to cure someone was to pray for their forgiveness
  • using herbal remedies and potions were seen as witchcraft and outlawed by the church
dcs-armstrong

Magna Carta and Tax Reform | Tax Foundation - 1 views

  • The Declaration of Independence asserts that governments “deriv[e] their just powers from the consent of the governed,” distilling concepts invoked by Locke and earlier English political reformers. For the English-speaking world, however, the germ of that concept can be found in Magna Carta. At the time, feudal barons could be required to provide what was known as “scutage,” essentially a fee in lieu of personal service typically used to hire mercenaries to fight the king’s wars. Other aid levies were also common. King John, however, was perceived as abusing the system, imposing unusually high levies and doing so even in the absence of war. Magna Carta introduced a revolutionary innovation: the idea that the power to tax was in some way limited by general consent. Still, it being the year 1215, there were some loopholes: No scutage not aid shall be imposed on our kingdom, unless by common counsel [alt. "general consent"] of our kingdom, except for ransoming our person, for making our eldest son a knight, and for once marrying our eldest daughter; and for these there shall not be levied more than a reasonable aid…
dcs-armstrong

Holy Relics - Middle Ages for Kids - 2 views

  • A holy relic was something that had once belonged to or been touched by Jesus or one of the important Saints
dcs-armstrong

Luke - Social Studies - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the medieval model of government predating the birth of the modern nation-state. Feudal society is a military hierarchy in which a ruler or lord offers mounted fighters a fief , a unit of land to control in exchange for a military service. 
dcs-armstrong

Sam V. - Social Studies - 0 views

  • Fiefs
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      I think you meant Vassal
  • fiefs
  • five steps without dropping it. If you didn't drop it then you were innocent. If you did drop it then you were guilty and went to jail
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • l and walking
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      They wrapped the hand then check later if it was healing correctly. 
dcs-armstrong

Khushi - Social Studies - 1 views

  • pay the Nobles and Knight's one tenth of it
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The one tenth rule was paid to the church. Other payments were given to the lords as a form of "rent".
dcs-armstrong

Gothic Names - 1 views

dcs-armstrong

Checks and Balances - 0 views

    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Constitution is the United States version of "Civil Law" 
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Constitution is the United States version of "Civil Law" 
  • hat was an important decision because it gave specific powers to each branch and set up something called checks and balances.
  • point of checks and balances was to make sure no one branch would be able to control too much power, and it created a separation of powers
  • ...20 more annotations...
  • some examples of how the different branches work together:
  • legislative branch makes laws
  • President in the executive branch can veto those laws
  • legislative branch makes laws
  • judicial branch can declare those laws unconstitutional.
  • President in the executive branch can veto a law,
  • legislative branch can override that veto with enough votes.
  • egislative branch has the power to approve Presidential nominations
  • control the budget
  • and can impeach the President and remove him or her from office.
  • executive branch can declare Executive Orders, which are like proclamations that carry the force of law
  • judicial branch can declare those acts unconstitutional.
  • judicial branch interprets laws
  • President nominates Supreme Court justices,
  • who make the evaluations.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Judicial branch interprets laws, but the President appoints Supreme Court Justices (judges). The judges that the President appoints are the people who interpret the law.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      The Judicial branch interprets laws, but the President appoints Supreme Court Justices (judges). The judges that the President appoints are the people who interpret the law.
  • judicial branch interprets laws
  • enate in the legislative branch confirms the President’s nominations for judicial positions
  • Congress can impeach any of those judges and remove them from office
  • Constitution divided the Government into three branches
dcs-armstrong

3 Branches of Government for Kids and Teachers - FREE Lesson Plans & Games for Kids - 0 views

    • dcs-armstrong
       
      When they say the Legislative branch "makes new laws" what they really mean is that the Legislative branch makes suggestions on what new laws should be. These suggestions are called "bills" it doesn't officially become a law until it goes through the entire process.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      When they say the Legislative branch "makes new laws" what they really mean is that the Legislative branch makes suggestions on what new laws should be. These suggestions are called "bills" it doesn't officially become a law until it goes through the entire process.
  • he men who wrote the Constitution wanted to make sure that no one branch became too powerful
  • checks and balances
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  • president is the commander in chief
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      (He commands the army)
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      (He commands the army)
  • BUT - the president cannot get
  • money to pay anyone
  • without the approval of Congress.
  • nearly everyone appointed by the president
  • pproved by Congress before they can take office.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Think what vocabulary word describes the first line "The government of the United States is composed of three branches".
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Think what vocabulary word describes the first line "The government of the United States is composed of three branches".
  • judicial branch
  • three branches
  • egislative branch
  • executive branch
  • executive branch sees that laws are carried out
  • legislative branch makes new laws
  • judicial branch makes sure that the laws
  • agree with the Constitution
dcs-armstrong

Romulus and Remus - History Learning Site - 0 views

  • legend
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      A legend is very similar to a myth... It is a story that is unproven 
dcs-armstrong

Scientists Blame Gerbils (Not Rats) for the Black Death - History in the Headlines - 2 views

  • Scientists Blame Gerbils (Not Rats) for the Black Death
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Scientists Blame Gerbils for the Spread of the Black Death
  • team of researchers now claims that blame may have been misplaced
  • researchers from the University of Oslo analyzed climate data going back to the 14th century
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • 7,711 historical plague outbreaks
  • Instead, they say, outbreaks of the Black Death seem to correspond with weather patterns in Asia, not Europe itself
  • plague outbreaks in Europe can be linked to the years that central Asia experienced wet springs followed by warm summe
  • such conditions would have been terrible for black rats, the scientists point out, they would have created ideal breeding conditions for another plague-bearing rodent: the gerbil.
dcs-armstrong

Medieval "Black Death" Was Airborne, Scientists Say - History in the Headlines - 0 views

  • w, analysis of skeletal remains found by construction workers digging railway tunnels in central London has led scientists to a stunning new conclusion: The Black Death was not transmitted through flea bites at all, but was an airborne plague spread through the coughs, sneezes and breath of infected human victims.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      New studies on the Black Death... Scientists say it was airborne
  • stumbled on a plague cemetery
  • cientists extracted DNA from one of the largest teeth in each of 12 skeletons
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • he bacterium that causes the plague, which confirmed that the individuals buried underneath the square had likely been exposed to—and died from—the Black Death.
  • Testing showed evidence of Yersinia pestis,
  • Currently, the plague still infects several thousand people every year around the world,
  • The medieval strain was no stronger than the recent one;
  • quickly and killed so many victims with such devastating speed, it would have to have been airborne
  • rather than bubonic plague, which is transmitted to humans through bites from infected rat fleas, they concluded that this must have been a pneumatic plague that made its way into the lungs of the infected and spread through coughs and sneezes.
  • 60 percent of Londoners were wiped out by the Black Death from the autumn of 1348 to spring of 1349.
  • omparable rate of destruction would today kill some 5 million people.
  • transmission by rat fleas as an explanation for the Black Death “simply isn’t good enough. It cannot spread fast enough from one household to the next to cause the huge number of cases that we saw during the Black Death epidemics.
  • mostly poor people who suffered from general ill health.
  • Archaeological analysi
  • ndividuals buried
  • malnutrition,
  • Another interesting finding was that the remains in the square appeared to come from three different periods: not only from the original Black Death epidemic in 1348-1350, but from later outbreaks in 1361 and the 1430s.
  • Archaeologists planning another dig in the area this summer estimate that thousands of bodies are left to be found underneath Charterhouse Square.
dcs-armstrong

Rats and fleas off the hook: humans passed Black Death to each other | News | The Week UK - 1 views

  • The Bubonic Plague of 1348 was actually a pneumonic plague, say scientists studying skeletons dug up in London
  • RATS and fleas have been unfairly implicated in the spread of the Black Death, according to scientists studying the remains of Londoners who died in the 14th century.
  • scientists now believe that a death rate of such magnitude would only have been possible if the plague had been airborne.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • Around 60 per cent of people living in the capital died
  • thought, this was courtesy of fleas carried by the black rat.
  • However
  • now believe the only way that the Black Death could have killed so many people in 1348 was if it was actually a pneumonic plague – an airborne version of the disease which can be spread from person to person through coughing
  • Speaking of rats and fleas, Dr Brooks told the Guardian:
  • Rats and fleas off the hook: humans p
dcs-armstrong

Romulus and Remus - 0 views

dcs-armstrong

Alexander The Great | Smore - 2 views

  • ost successful military commanders
  • Pella ,Gr
  • her,P
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • Although
  • ral.Alexa
  • e , ri
  • covered 3,000
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      I think an addition of a map either here or in the first paragraph showing all of the land he was able to conquer using modern day countries ex. Spain, Egypt 
  • miles
  • age of 20!!!.
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      What about adding another heading like Alexander the Great's Legacy? Then in there you can talk about the Hellenistic culture that he helped spread throughout the empire. 
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      Rather than talking about the specific battles maybe talk about how he used the spread of Greek culture, along with other cultures to help make hi successful. He was also able to encourage loyalty through his actions towards religion (I don't want to say much here because I think you will find it interesting and I don't want to ruin it for you :) 
    • dcs-armstrong
       
      I like the video I haven't looked at any of the others but this is one is pretty good. 
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