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Garth Holman

Medieval education in Europe: Schools & Universities - 0 views

  • It is estimated that by 1330, only 5% of the total population of Europe received any sort of education
  • Even then education, as we understand it, was not accessible or even desired by everyone. Schools were mostly only accessible to the sons of high lords of the land.
  • In most kingdoms in Europe, education was overseen by the church.
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  • The very fact that the curriculum was structured by the church gave it the ability to mould the students to follow its doctrine
  • Unofficially, education started from a very young age. This sort of early education depended on the feudal class of the child’s parents
  • Even the children of serfs would be taught the skills needed to survive by their parents. The boys would be taken out into the fields to observe and to help their parents with easy tasks, while the girls would work with the animals at home, in the vegetable garden with their mothers, or watch them weave.
  • Children of craftsmen and merchants were educated from a very young age in the trade of their fathers. Trade secrets rarely left a family and they had to be taught and understood by all male (and unusually, female) heirs, in order to continue the family legacy.
  • Young boys of noble birth would learn how to hunt and swing a weapon, while the young ladies of nobility would learn how to cook
  • The main subject of study in those schools was Latin (reading and writing). In addition to this, students were also taught rhetoric – the art of public speaking and persuasion – which was a very useful tool for both men of the cloth and nobles alike.
  • Lessons frequently started at sunrise and finished at sunset
  • University education, across the whole of the continent, was a luxury to which only the wealthiest and brightest could ever aspire
  • Since the creation of the first university in 1088
  • Students attended the Medieval University at different ages, ranging from 14 (if they were attending Oxford or Paris to study the Arts) to their 30s (if they were studying Law in Bologna)
  • The dynamic between students and teachers in a medieval university was significantly different from today. In the University of Bologna students hired and fired teachers by consensus. The students also bargained as a collective regarding fees, and threatened teachers with strikes if their demands were not met
  • A Master of Arts degree in the medieval education system would have taken six years; a Bachelor of Arts degree would be awarded after completing the third or fourth year. By “Arts” the degree was referring to the seven liberal arts – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric
  • The sons of the peasants could only be educated if the lord of the manor had given his permission
  • Any family caught having a son educated without permission was heavily fined
  • Historians today believe that this policy was another way in which authority figures attempted to control the peasants, since an educated peasant/villein might prove to question the way things were done and upset the balance of power which kept the nobles strong.
  • Students held the legal status of clerics which, according to the Canon Law, could not be held by women; women were therefore not admitted into universities.
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    This explains the importance of education and how each group got an education.
Angela W

The Middle Ages - 2 views

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    Great info on what life was like and what happened during the middle ages. Good info about travel as well.
Garth Holman

Go Social Studies Go! | europe-in-the-dark-ages - 2 views

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    Great resource for many key ideas we need to know. 
Garth Holman

Medieval Education - 2 views

  • free education to every boy
    • Lily S
       
      Only boys?
  • using a bone or ivory stylus on wooden tablets coated with green or black wax
  • Knights were also educated and looked down upon if they could not read and write
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  • Only daughters of the very rich and powerful were allowed to attend select courses.
  • At 14 or 15
  • continue education at a university
  • The cap and gown that college graduates wear today have their roots in medieval academic garments
  • empire needed educated people if it was to survive
  • Girls were virtually ignored when it came to education.
    • Garth Holman
       
      Yes, girls were not educated
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    Has everything in the Middle Ages - Education, Clothing, Entertainment, and more
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    Covers all major topics of middle ages: education, clothing, bathing, games, music festivals, village life, etc... Check it out with your diigo on. 
Garth Holman

Inside a Medieval Castle - 1 views

  • The rooms where the lord of a castle, his family and his knights lived and ate and slept were in the Keep (called the Donjon), the rectangular tower inside the walls of a castle. This was meant to be the strongest and safest place.
  • The outer wall of a castle was called Bailey. This was where buildings for the castle's cattle, horses and servants lived. Some of the soldiers needed to defend the castle might live in part of the gatehouse known as the Barbican.
    • Garth Holman
       
      What is a siege? 
    • mluxenburg m
       
      A Siege is an Attack on a castle.
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  • There were kitchens and pantries where food was stored for everyday preparation. The Great Hall and the bedchambers were there too.
  • The Great Hall
  • The Bedchamber
  • Kitchen
  • A wealthy knight, his family and guests ate well. Unlike most people, they had plenty of meat like deer, goose and rabbit. On Fridays and Holy Days meat was forbidden by the church, so they ate fish or eels. If there was a special feast, the people working in the kitchens would prepare wild boar, roast swan, or even roast peacock, served with all its feathers as decoration. Some of these would be caught by the lord of the castle and his friends while out hunting with their hawks.
  • Many castles had stone toilets built over holes in the outer walls. These emptied into a pit way below.
  • Medieval castles did not have running water, yet people did like to bathe at least once a year. In some castles there was a room next to the kitchen where they bathed in groups. The lord might have hot water brought to his bedchamber and poured into a big wooden tub, where he sat on a low stool in. The water might have perfume or rose leaves sprinkled in it. Soap was made of sheep fat with ashes and soda. Teeth were cleaned by scraping them with a hazel twig and rubbing them with a woollen cloth.
    • Garth Holman
       
      SEE NEXT PAGE FOR OUTSIDE OF THE CASTLE. 
Garth Holman

Of Monks, Medieval Scribes, and Middlemen - 0 views

  • : In the early Middle Ages, the Church played a very important role in protecting ancient works, and monks were heavily involved in the “reproduction and preservation of the literature that had been inherited from earlier writers,—writers whose works had been accepted as classics.”
  • The monks who were not yet competent to work as scribes were to be instructed by the others.”
  • The copying of books was also slow, tedious, and very time-consuming; it took years for a scribe to complete “a particularly fine manuscript with colored initials and miniature art work.”
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  • it is, therefore, no surprise that monks sometimes jotted remarks about their frustration and relief in the margins, or the colophons, of their manuscripts. Examples of these remarks included “Thin ink, bad vellum, difficult text,” “Thank God, it will soon be dark,” and “Now I’ve written the whole thing: for Christ’s sake give me a drink.”
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    A more difficult read, but explains the life of Monks, Medieval Scribes and other middlemen.  
Patrick M

▶ The Medieval Manor - YouTube - 0 views

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    Its a great video and it tells you a lot of information.
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    A decent video
Angela W

The Middle Ages: Religion - 6 views

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    This is a great website about religion in the Middle Ages and what people did. For more info click the Read More link.
Lance C

Goodgame Empire | Goodgame Studios - 3 views

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    Game where you build your own kingdom and conquer others. 
Garth Holman

Bishops in the Middle Ages | Middle Ages - 1 views

  • The Bishops being a key figure of the society and being wealthy by virtue of his position in the clergy used to live either in a castle or a manor
  • Every king was supposed to have one Bishop in his court for consultation.
  • The rulings of the clergy affected everyone during the Middle Ages.
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  • Bishops had become so powerful that it was mandatory for the king to take orders and consult the Bishop in everyday affairs over the state.
  • f you were born in one class of the society, you belonged to that class for your entire life with no chances of improving your status through hard work.
  • They were generally from a noble family or a wealthy family from some town.
  • He used to take tours around the country to many churches within the country. There was a seat reserved for the Bishop in every church in the country.
  • Listening to the plights of all the priests and clergymen below him; Levy taxes on the peasants; Settling of important issues such as annulment of marriage; Maintaining an army of his own to assist the king during war; Leading his army in the war was common in the Early Middle Ages for Bishops; Take care of the spiritual soundness of his diocese; Implement the code of the church in the diocese; Take care of the business of the church in their diocese and supervise the priests, nuns and monks in their activities.
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    tells about key ideas a being a bishop 
Cameron G.

The Middle Ages for Kids - Common People, the Manorial System - 1 views

  • If the manor land was sold or reassigned to a new owner, the serfs stayed with the land.
  • Serfs had many jobs on the manor including craftsmen, bakers, farmers, and tax collectors
  • They had to do the job they were assigned to do. 
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  • Serfs could buy their freedom from the manor, but where would they get the money?
  • If a new lord took over the manor, he would need the serfs for labor.
  • Peasants were free to leave if they wished
  • Peasants worked the land and made the goods in exchange for protection.
  • Other than that, their life was just like a serf's life.
  • A few peasants escaped the hard work on the farm by joining the church. But most lived and died on the manor where they were born.
  • Everyone had to pay taxes to the lord
  • To pay the crop tax, some crops went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the bread tax, some bread they made went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the coat tax, some of the warm coats they made went to the lord, and some they kept.
  • Everything was paid in barter. Coinage or money did not exist on the manor. 
  • People believed that the only way to get to Heaven was to follow the teachings in the Bible.
  • The common people could not read or write.
  • The priest told them who they must marry and when. You had to do everything the priest said if you wanted to get to heaven. 
  • peasants and serfs were mostly content with their lot.
  • work kept everyone on the manor fed and comfortable, including themselves. 
  • They were not slaves. These people could not be bought and sold. But they could not leave the manor without permission.
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