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Garth Holman

This dissident poet says elections and the nuclear pact give him hope for Iran | Public... - 0 views

  • The 44-year-old journalist and poet might have ended up dead, like some of his writer friends back home in Iran. Several of them were murdered in a series of political assassinations that began in the late 1990s.
  • freedom of expression, the Islamic Republic of Iran is among the worst of the worst. The country is ranked 169th, out of a total of 180 countries, on the 2016 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters Without Borders.
  • Rafizadeh looks every bit the intellectual — glasses, leather jacket, cigarette. As a child, he would wake up early and recite Persian poetry out loud, annoying his father and his siblings. 
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  • “The [Iranian] government intrudes into your personal life no matter who you are. That’s why, after the murders started happening, I decided to write political poems,” he says. 
  • “Other intellectuals were killed, too,” he says. “The Iranian regime was murdering innocent people just because they dared to call for political change and reform.” 
  • afizadeh managed to shine a light on the killings with his writings in the pages of pro-reformist newspapers. But only for a time. Eventually, Rafizadeh was arrested.“I spent 86 days in a cell that was 1.5 meters by 2 meters,” Rafizadeh says. “And I was tortured.” 
  • Even after he was released, pending trial, he says authorities threatened to harm his children if he didn’t make public statements saying he was treated well in prison and that his past writings were false.
  • Rafizadeh says he did what he was being pressured to do. But he adds that, “the Iranian public knew who was lying and who was telling the truth.” “Other journalists besides me wrote about the human rights situation in Iran and we did have an impact,” Rafizadeh says. Nonetheless, he felt he had to leave the country after the courts sentenced him to 20 lashes and nine months in prison. He escaped into Turkey in 2005. Two years later, he got asylum in Canada. 
  • “But, as it happened, there is in Iran what you might call a ‘deep state.’” 
  • None of these political actors are entirely answerable to Iran’s elected government. That enabled the hardliners to launch a brutal crackdown against the pro-reform camp of then-president Mohammad Khatami and his supporters. The crackdown began in in the late '90s and continued into the early 2000s.
  • “You can fight for rights and freedoms in the political space all you like, but if there is not judicial protection of them, that is a fundamental problem,” she says. 
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    Dissident and actions in the modern world. 
Garth Holman

Spanish Inquisition Trials - How the Spanish Inquisition Worked | HowStuffWorks - 0 views

  • the inquisitions were tribunals -- a type of trial where the judge (or judges) tries the accused and passes judgment. But these trials were unique in several ways. The accused was required to testify, and he didn't get a lawyer or any assistance. If he refused to testify, the Inquisitor took this refusal as proof of his guilt. Anybody could testify against him, including relatives, criminals and other heretics, and he wasn't told who his accusers were. The accused usually didn't have any witnesses testify on his behalf, because they could also fall under suspicion of being a heretic. He also wasn't always immediately informed of the charges against him.
Sami Z

The Truth About the Spanish Inquisition - 0 views

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    this is based on catholic perspective 
Zack Z

The Inquisition - 0 views

    • Zack Z
       
      They kill jewish people who converted.
  • sh Inquisition sou
  • Unlike its earlier version, the Spa
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    This is a very good website.
Olivia A

Student Work Sample: The Spanish Inquisition - 0 views

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    This is a really good site, and explains things well. 
Lily S

Inquisition: The Spanish Inquisition | Infoplease.com - 0 views

  • abolished in 1834.
    • Lily S
       
      1478 to 1834 is 356 years!
  • The purpose of the Spanish Inquisition was to discover and punish converted Jews (and later Muslims) who were insincere.
  • established (1478) by Ferdinand and Isabella
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  • The censorship policy even condemned books approved
  • harsher, more highly organized, and far freer with the death penalty
Lily S

The Galileo Project | Christianity | The Inquisition - 0 views

  • The inquisitor questioned the accused in the presence of at least two witnesses.
    • Lily S
       
      Two witnesses so that the testimony isn't biased.
  • Penalties went from visits to churches, pilgrimages, and wearing the cross of infamy to imprisonment
  • death
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  • Death was by burning at the stake
  • In 1231, Pope Gregory IX published a decree which called for life imprisonment with salutary penance for the heretic who had confessed and repented and capital punishment for those who persisted. The secular authorities were to carry out the execution.
  • The accused had to testify against himself/herself and not have the right to face and question his/her accuser.
Mia K

Interesting Facts About the Spanish Inquisition | Doug Lawrence's Catholic Weblog - 0 views

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    This website is really good for straight to the point information about the spanish inquisition it basically summarizes up what we have been working on in class. 
aelepele a

Secrets of the Spanish Inquisition Revealed | Catholic Answers - 0 views

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    This was a really good website that gives you detailed back ground history on the spanish inquisition. 
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    Secrets Revealed
gpinhasi g

HowStuffWorks "How the Spanish Inquisition Worked" - 0 views

  • The Inquisition officially began with Pope Gregory XI (the Papal Inquisition). In 1231, he issued a bull, or decree, that set up a tribunal court system to try heretics and punish them.
  • The Spanish Inquisition was unique in that it was established by secular rulers, King Ferdinand II and Queen Isabella, with the approval of Pope Sixtus IV.
Kyle W

The Inquisition - 0 views

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    Another website on the Spanish Inquisition.
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    This source is very descriptive and it is a good source about the inquisition. 
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    Inquisition 
jyslain

HowStuffWorks "How the Spanish Inquisition Worked" - 0 views

    • cglosser c
       
      Priests tortured people who refused to admit that they were heretics.
  • The Spanish Inquisition was just one of several inquisitions that occurred between the 12th and 19th centuries
    • cglosser c
       
      This proves that the Spanish Inquisition didn't just last for just months, for hundreds of years!
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  • Circa 1500, A prisoner undergoing torture at the hands of the Spanish Inquisition. Monks in the background wait for his confession with quill and paper.
  • The term "inquisition" has a third meaning also -- the trials themselves
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    How the spanish inquisition worked.
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    Have you ever heard someone say "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition"? The line comes from a series of sketches by British comedy troupe Monty Py­thon. In the sketches, one character gets annoyed at another character for asking him question after question. At the height of his frustration, he yells, "Well, I wasn't expecting the Spanish Inquisition!"
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    This a website I found on how the Spanish Inquisition works.
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    Inquisition 
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    info on the spanish inquisition
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    This is an how stuff works web article explaining the Spanish Inquisition.  For those who are reading this article, you will see lots of ads. Do not let those distract you.
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