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Garth Holman

History: Middle Ages Monasteries for Kids - 6 views

  • A monastery was a building, or buildings, where people lived and worshiped, devoting their time and life to God.
  • The people who lived in the monastery were called monks. The monastery was self contained, meaning everything the monks needed was provided by the monastery community. They made their own clothes and grew their own food. They had no need for the outside world. This way they could be somewhat isolated and could focus on God. There were monasteries spread throughout Europe during the Middle Ages.
  • only people in the Middle Ages who knew how to read and write. They provided education to the rest of the world.
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  • place where travelers could stay during
  • helped to feed the poor, take care of the sick, and provided education to boys in the local community.
  • day in the Middle Ages was spent praying, worshiping in church, reading the Bible, and meditating.
  • different jobs depending on their talents and interests.
  • Abbot - The Abbot was the head of the monastery or abbey.
  • A part of this vow was that they were dedicating their life to the monastery and the order of monks they were entering.
  • They were to give up worldly goods and devote their lives to God and discipline. They also took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
  • Monks and nuns were generally the most educated people during the Middle Ages. They spent much of their day in silence.
  • A scribe may spend over a year copying a long book like the Bible.
Garth Holman

Bishops in the Middle Ages | Middle Ages - 1 views

  • The Bishops being a key figure of the society and being wealthy by virtue of his position in the clergy used to live either in a castle or a manor
  • Every king was supposed to have one Bishop in his court for consultation.
  • The rulings of the clergy affected everyone during the Middle Ages.
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  • Bishops had become so powerful that it was mandatory for the king to take orders and consult the Bishop in everyday affairs over the state.
  • f you were born in one class of the society, you belonged to that class for your entire life with no chances of improving your status through hard work.
  • They were generally from a noble family or a wealthy family from some town.
  • He used to take tours around the country to many churches within the country. There was a seat reserved for the Bishop in every church in the country.
  • Listening to the plights of all the priests and clergymen below him; Levy taxes on the peasants; Settling of important issues such as annulment of marriage; Maintaining an army of his own to assist the king during war; Leading his army in the war was common in the Early Middle Ages for Bishops; Take care of the spiritual soundness of his diocese; Implement the code of the church in the diocese; Take care of the business of the church in their diocese and supervise the priests, nuns and monks in their activities.
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    tells about key ideas a being a bishop 
Garth Holman

The Medieval Church - 3 views

  • From the very earliest of ages, the people were taught that the only way they could get to Heaven was if the Roman Catholic Church let them. Everybody would have been terrified of Hell and the people would have been told of the sheer horrors awaiting for them in Hell in the weekly services they attended.
  • The control the Church had over the people was total. Peasants worked for free on Church land. This proved difficult for peasants as the time they spent working on Church land, could have been better spent working on their own plots of land producing food for their families.
  • They paid 10% of what they earned in a year to the Church (this tax was called tithes). Tithes could be paid in either money or in goods produced by the peasant farmers. As peasants had little money, they almost always had to pay in seeds, harvested grain, animals etc. This usually caused a peasant a lot of hardship as seeds, for example, would be needed to feed a family the following year.
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  • What the Church got in tithes was kept in huge tithe barns; a lot of the stored grain would have been eaten  by rats or poisoned by their urine.
  • A failure to pay tithes, so the peasants were told by the Church, would lead to their souls going to Hell after they had died. 
  • People were too scared not to pay tithes despite the difficulties it meant for them.
  • You also had to pay for baptisms (if you were not baptised you could not go to Heaven when you died), marriages (there were no couples living together in Medieval times as the Church taught that this equaled sin) and burials - you had to be buried on holy land if your soul was to get to heaven. Whichever way you looked, the Church received money.
  • The Church also did not have to pay taxes.
  • Important cities would have cathedrals in them.
  • To work on the building of a cathedral was a great honour. Those who did the skilled work had to belong to a guild. They would have used just the most basic of tools and less than strong scaffolding to do the ceilings. However, if you were killed in an accident while working in a cathedral or a church, you were guaranteed a place in Heaven - or so the workers were told.
  • Their sheer size meant that people would see them from miles around, and remind them of the huge power of the Catholic Church in Medieval England.
    • Shira H
       
      Great site for quest 5
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    Medieval Church
Aryeh C

Weird religious practices of the middle ages - 0 views

  • Puss-Drinking and Scab-Eating--The general populace scorned lepers for their appearance and disease. As an act of humility and caring, many female saints such as St. Catherine would care for these "untouchables" by licking away the puss in their wounds then eating the scabs. People considered these saints especially holy.
  • These men would take a ladder, climb up to the top of a ruined Roman column, sit down, and then kick away the ladder, vowing to remain there contemplating God until they died.
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    These are some of the most bizarre medieval religious practices.
Jenny L.

http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/year7links/life/foulfood.pdf - 1 views

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    Explains about what people ate in the Middle ages
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