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tcornett

Mapping History - Compromises Over Slavery - 0 views

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    Compromises over Slavery
tcornett

Mapping History - The Presidential Election of 1860 - 0 views

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    The Presidential Election of 1860
tcornett

Mapping History - The US Civil War, Part I - 0 views

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    The US Civil War, Part I
tcornett

Mapping History - The US Civil War, Part II - 0 views

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    The US Civil War, Part II
tcornett

Mapping History - Reconstruction - 0 views

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    Reconstruction
tcornett

Compare Two Worlds: North vs South | Underground Railroad Student Activity | Scholastic... - 0 views

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    Compare North and South states on interactive maps to identify the differences between free and slave populations before the Civil War. Also includes discussion questions.
tcornett

EDSITEment lessons on Slavery, the Crisis of the Union, the Civil War and Reconstructio... - 0 views

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    Slavery and African Americans in Antebellum America  |  Causes of the War  |  Abraham Lincoln and the Course of the War  |  The Art and Literature of the Civil War  |  Reconstruction and After in Art and Culture  |  Related EDSITEment Websites
tcornett

Abraham Lincoln | 60-Second Presidents | Social Studies | Video | PBS LearningMedia - 0 views

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    PBS LearningMedia Video for Social Studies for 4-12
tcornett

Andrew Johnson | 60-Second Presidents | Social Studies | Video | PBS LearningMedia - 0 views

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    PBS LearningMedia Video for Social Studies for 4-12
tcornett

The Red Badge of Courage: An Episode of the American Civil War by Stephen Crane - 0 views

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    The Red Badge of Courage is a war novel by American author Stephen Crane. Taking place during the American Civil War, the story is about a young private of the Union Army, Henry Fleming, who flees from the field of battle. - Wikipedia
tcornett

Lessons: 1850-1877 - 0 views

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    Civil War and Reconstruction (1850-1877) - National Archives
tcornett

Episode 20: Reconstruction | 15 Minute History - 0 views

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    Host: Joan Neuberger, Professor of History and Editor, Not Even Past
    Guest: H.W. Brands, Dickson, Allen, Anderson Centennial Professor of History, UT-Austin

    After the chaos of the American Civil War, Congress and lawmakers had to figure out how to put the Union back together again-no easy feat, considering that issues of political debate were settled on the battlefield, but not in the courtroom nor in the arena of public opinion. How did the defeated South and often vindictive North manage to resolve their differences over issues so controversial that they had torn the Union apart?

    Historian H.W. Brands from UT's Department of History reflects on this issues and how he has dealt with them in his thirty years of experience in teaching about Reconstruction: "It's one of the hardest parts of American history to teach, in part because I think it's the hardest to just understand."
tcornett

MOOC | Eric Foner - The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1865-1890 | Sections 1 through 9 ... - 0 views

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    Youtube Playlist

    Learn about the political, social, and economic changes in the Union and the Confederacy and the Civil War's long-term economic and intellectual impact.

    In The Unfinished Revolution: Reconstruction and After, 1865-1890, Professor Eric Foner examines the pivotal but misunderstood era of Reconstruction that followed the Civil War, the first effort in American history to construct an interracial democracy. Beginning with a discussion of the dramatic change in historians' interpretations of the period in the last two generations, Foner goes on to discuss how Reconstruction turned on issues of continued relevance today. Among these are: who is an American citizen and what are citizens' rights; what is the relationship between political and economic freedom; which has the primary responsibility for protecting Americans' rights - the federal or state governments; and how should public authorities respond to episodes of terrorism? The course explores the rewriting of the laws and Constitution to incorporate the principle of equality regardless of race; the accomplishments and failings of Reconstruction governments in the South; the reasons for violent opposition in the South and for the northern retreat from Reconstruction; and the consolidation at the end of the 19th century of a new system of white supremacy.

    This course is part of the series, The Civil War and Reconstruction, which introduces students to the most pivotal era in American history. The Civil War transformed the nation by eliminating the threat of secession and destroying the institution of slavery. It raised questions that remain central to our understanding of ourselves as a people and a nation - the balance of power between local and national authority, the boundaries of citizenship, and the meanings of freedom and equality. The series will examine the causes of the war, the road to secession, the conduct of the Civil War, the coming of emancipation, and the struggle after the wa
tcornett

MOOC | Eric Foner - The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1861-1865 | Sections 1 through 8 ... - 0 views

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    Youtube Playlist

    Learn about the political, social, and economic changes in the Union and the Confederacy and the Civil War's long-term economic and intellectual impact.

    A New Birth of Freedom: The Civil War, 1861-1865 narrates the history of the American Civil War. While the course examines individual engagements and the overall nature of the military conflict, the focus is less on the battlefield than on political, social, and economic change in the Union and the Confederacy. Central to the account are the road to emancipation, the role of black soldiers, the nature of Abraham Lincoln's wartime leadership, internal dissent in both the North and South, the changing position of women in both societies, and the war's long-term economic and intellectual impact. We end with a look at the beginnings of Reconstruction during the conflict.

    This course is part of the series, The Civil War and Reconstruction, which introduces students to the most pivotal era in American history. The Civil War transformed the nation by eliminating the threat of secession and destroying the institution of slavery. It raised questions that remain central to our understanding of ourselves as a people and a nation - the balance of power between local and national authority, the boundaries of citizenship, and the meanings of freedom and equality. The series will examine the causes of the war, the road to secession, the conduct of the Civil War, the coming of emancipation, and the struggle after the war to breathe meaning into the promise of freedom for four million emancipated slaves. One theme throughout the series is what might be called the politics of history - how the world in which a historian lives affects his or her view of the past, and how historical interpretations reinforce or challenge the social order of the present.

    See other courses in this series:

    The Civil War and Reconstruction - 1850-1861
    The Civil War and Reconstruction - 1865-1890

    "The Civil War and Recons
tcornett

MOOC | Eric Foner - The Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1861 | Sections 1 through 10... - 0 views

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    Youtube Playlist

    The Civil War and Reconstruction - 1850 -1861

    Discover how the issue of slavery came to dominate American politics, and how political leaders struggled and failed to resolve the growing crisis in the nation.

    A House Divided: The Road to Civil War, 1850-1861 is a course that begins by examining how generations of historians have explained the crisis of the Union. After discussing the institution of slavery and its central role in the southern and national economies, it turns to an account of the political and social history of the 1850s. It traces how the issue of the expansion of slavery came to dominate national politics, and how political leaders struggled, unsuccessfully, to resolve the growing crisis. We will examine the impact of key events such as Bleeding Kansas, the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, and John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, and end with the dissolution of the Union in the winter of 1860-61.

    This course is part of the series, The Civil War and Reconstruction, which introduces students to the most pivotal era in American history. The Civil War transformed the nation by eliminating the threat of secession and destroying the institution of slavery. It raised questions that remain central to our understanding of ourselves as a people and a nation - the balance of power between local and national authority, the boundaries of citizenship, and the meanings of freedom and equality. The series will examine the causes of the war, the road to secession, the conduct of the Civil War, the coming of emancipation, and the struggle after the war to breathe meaning into the promise of freedom for four million emancipated slaves. One theme throughout the series is what might be called the politics of history - how the world in which a historian lives affects his or her view of the past, and how historical interpretations reinforce or challenge the social order of the present.

    Eric Foner, DeWitt Clinton Professor o
tcornett

The Civil War and Reconstruction | edX - 0 views

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    Civil War and Reconstruction, which introduces students to the most pivotal era in American history. The Civil War transformed the nation by eliminating the threat of secession and destroying the institution of slavery. It raised questions that remain central to our understanding of ourselves as a people and a nation - the balance of power between local and national authority, the boundaries of citizenship, and the meanings of freedom and equality. This XSeries will examine the causes of the war, the road to secession, the conduct of the Civil War, the coming of emancipation, and the struggle after the war to breathe meaning into the promise of freedom for four million emancipated slaves. One theme throughout the series is what might be called the politics of history - how the world in which a historian lives affects his or her view of the past, and how historical interpretations reinforce or challenge the social order of the present.
Ian Gabrielson

Why Are They Talking? - 3 views

  • Community-based oral history projects, often seeking to enhance feelings of local identity and pride, tend to side step more difficult and controversial aspects of a community's history, as interviewer and narrator collude to present the community's best face.
  • More practically, narrators whose interviews are intended for web publication, with a potential audience of millions, are perhaps more likely to exercise a greater degree of self-censorship than those whose interviews will be placed in an archive, accessible only to scholarly researchers. Personal motives too can color an interview.
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