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Michael Hait

The Generations Project - 3 views

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    The Generations Project is a new reality series that helps those who have questions about their family history investigate their own identities by walking in the shoes of their ancestors. As they undertake these journeys, they often uncover the hidden identities in family pasts, and come to see that in many cases the best way to know who you are is to know who you came from.
Michael Hait

Maryland Historical Society to present genealogy workshops with Robert Barnes - 0 views

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    The Maryland Historical Society and genealogist and author Robert Barnes will once again present a series of four Family History workshops this year.
Michael Hait

Two must-read online resources for African-American genealogy research - 1 views

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    The following two sites provide a wealth of information for those wishing to learn more about their African-American ancestors...
Michael Hait

Case study for Y-DNA testing in NGSQ - 0 views

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    On 20 October 2009, this column addressed the topic of Y-DNA testing for genealogical purposes. This relatively new development in science holds revolutionary potential for genealogy, especially African-American research. The most recent issue of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (Sep 2009) contains the case study of an African-American family where Y-DNA testing revealed direct male line European ancestry.[1]
Michael Hait

Civil War pension application files - a rich source of detail - 2 views

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    Many Civil War veterans and their widows or other dependents received pensions from the U. S. government for their support. For those researchers whose ancestors received pensions for service, these files are arguably the single richest record group in terms of information contained within them.
Michael Hait

Reading history blogs for genealogical context - 0 views

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    This column has previously focused on African-American genealogy blogs, in the articles Shout-outs to African-American Genealogy Blogs and More shout-outs to African-American genealogy blogs. A third edition soon forthcoming will spotlight several new genealogy blogs. The responsible genealogist, however, would be advised to learn more about United States history, including how it affected African-Americans. History blogs are a vital source for keeping up with current perspectives as well as newly available historical resources, many of which may provide genealogically useful information.
Michael Hait

The African American Genealogy Examiner: 2009 Year in Review - 0 views

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    As we near the end of the year 2009, the African American Genealogy Examiner would like to look back and remember the accomplishments of the past year.
Michael Hait

African-American Genealogy Examiner receives Kreativ Blogger award - 0 views

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    Robyn Smith, of the "Reclaiming Kin" blog, has awarded the African-American Genealogy Examiner with the "Kreativ Blogger" award. This award was created by Hulda Husfrue, a Norwegian arts & crafts blogger on 5 May 2008. [Please note that her site is in Norwegian but you can translate the page using Google Translate.] From these humble beginnings the award has spread like wildfire, and the Geneablogger community regularly recognizes their favorite peers with this award.
Michael Hait

FBI begins 'Civil Rights-Era Cold Case Initiative' seeking next-of-kin for unsolved mur... - 0 views

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    During the struggle for civil rights, many brave men and women sacrificed their lives to improve the lives of Americans of all races. Unfortunately, because of lingering institutional racism in the South, the murders of these civil rights workers were not all investigated to their fullest, and quite a few went unsolved. The Federal Bureau of Investigation recently announced its "Civil Rights-Era Cold Case Initiative," to try to identify the next-of-kin of some of the victims of these cases.
Michael Hait

Happy Veterans Day! Military databases available free online at Archives.gov - 1 views

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    In honor of the many U. S. veterans that have served in our armed forces throughout the history of this great nation, the African American Genealogy Examiner column today will provide instructions on accessing several free records databases available online at the website of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).
Michael Hait

Are census records reliable for genealogy research? - 0 views

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    Over the last six months, this column has discussed the "Anatomy" of the federal census for the years from 1870-1930, not including the mostly-destroyed 1890 census. In this series of articles, each column of the census questionnaire was examined, and clues that will aid your research were discussed. If you have missed any of these articles, you can read them again using the links below:

    Anatomy of the 1930 federal census
    Anatomy of the 1920 federal census
    Anatomy of the 1910 federal census
    Anatomy of the 1900 federal census
    Anatomy of the 1880 federal census
    Anatomy of the 1870 federal census

    In a discussion concerning the federal census as evidence for genealogical research, however, one must also consider the question: are census records reliable sources?
Michael Hait

Anatomy of the 1870 federal census - 0 views

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    This article is part of a continuing series looking at each federal census individually. Please read the others in the archives of this column.
    The 1870 U. S. Census was the Ninth Decennial Census. This census is probably the single most important census for genealogists conducting research on African-American families
Michael Hait

The importance of the 1870 U. S. Census to African-American research - 0 views

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    When the 1860 federal census was collected and enumerated, slavery was still legal within most of the states south of the Mason-Dixon line. The 1860 federal census enumerated only free people of color in its population schedule; slaves were enumerated namelessly on a separate schedule, identified only by slave owner, age, gender, and color.
Michael Hait

The basics of Y-DNA testing for genealogy - 0 views

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    From CSI to The Maury Povich Show, DNA and DNA testing has become a part of American popular culture. But what is DNA?
    In simple terms, DNA is a string of proteins that contain coded blueprints for our bodies. It tells our bodies how to grow. We inherit our DNA from our parents, which is where its genealogical value comes in.
Michael Hait

Using 'clusters' to identify slave owners - 0 views

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    Previous posts in this column demonstrated the use of family clusters and neighborhood clusters to identify families in the U. S. federal census. In this post, we will use these same techniques to identify the last owners of a family freed after the abolition of slavery.
Michael Hait

More state online resources for African-American genealogy: Virginia - 0 views

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    In an earlier entry, this column reported on several resources available for online African-American research in Virginia. Many more resources are now available, some becoming so just in the past three months since that report, necessitating another visit to the subject.
Brian DeGraaf

25 Most Popular Genealogy Blogs of 2009 | ProGenealogists - 0 views

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    A list compiled on April 3, 2009
Brian DeGraaf

Nominate a Genealogy Blog for the Family Tree 40 - Family Tree Magazine - 0 views

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    Do you have a favorite few genealogy blogs that you read regularly? Maybe the blogger offers excellent genealogy advice, insightful analysis or a unique point of view. Or the writing especially creative or humorous.\n\nIf so, we want to know about it. In the May 2010 issue, we'll be naming the Family Tree Magazine 40 Best Genealogy Blogs ("Family Tree 40" for short).\n\nFirst, we're asking the genealogy community to nominate the genealogy blogs they read most. Later, family historians will vote on their favorite blogs in several categories.
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