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Abbey Roberts

What Americans think about NSA surveillance, national security and privacy - 4 views

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    This is the results of a Pew Research survey in May (of 2015) regarding Americans' opinions of the NSA, surveillance, national security, etc. This could be useful in the security vs. privacy paper, to look at the public opinion on these issues.
nate_clause

You Are Being Tracked: How License Plate Readers Are Being Used to Record Americans' Movements | American Civil Liberties Union - 0 views

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    There are already in place many automatic license plate readers on things such as road signs and bridges. This has purposes for helping track vehicles known to be owned by criminals, but simultaneously the tracking information is stored for millions of innocent people as well.
Annie Vreeland

Walking on Eggshells: Anatomy of a Science Story | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network - 0 views

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    I like the way this is written because the author makes it a fun read. It is not a long boring article about the writing process of her story, but rather it breaks down her process into steps. Moreover, her writing is entertaining, which grasped my interest more so than many other posts. 
Hannah Lee

Knowing When To Fold 'Em: The Science of Poker | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network - 0 views

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    This article concerning the science behind poker and its categorization as either skill or luck is particularly well written in that it draws its audience in by presenting a recent event that concerned poker, and then proceeding to present information on the history of poker as well as the statistics that support its argument.  Furthermore, the author establishes credibility throughout her post by referencing credible studies done. Her voice throughout the post continues to be entertaining, keeping the reader's attention for the entirety of her post.
Derek Bruff

American Botanical Council Publishes Revolutionary Analysis Unlocking Mysteries of 500-Year-Old Manuscript - Press Release - Digital Journal - 0 views

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    A little progress on the mysterious Voynich manuscript...
Allison Molo

Physicists on Ice: Exploring the Physics of Curling | Cocktail Party Physics, Scientific American Blog Network - 0 views

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    I felt that this article was particularly well written because of how conversational the author was with the reader. The conversational aspect allows the scientific aspect of the article to be better understood, in a way. The use of a video was also allowed for a better understanding of the physics.
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    I was thinking about doing this one! I curled for a couple of winters, and always wondered about the weirdly illogical physics of curling stones. Unfortunately, the nearest curling club is 3 hours away in Knoxville...
nate_clause

Oppenheimer's Folly: On black holes, fundamental laws and pure and applied science | The Curious Wavefunction, Scientific American Blog Network - 0 views

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    I feel this article is well written for a few reasons. If has the feel of telling a story but remains formal and in the style of academic writing at the same time. The flow of the post is very well done also as each paragraph logically leads into the next. Lastly, the post concludes very well tying in everything the post discusses and how they relate to science in the world today.
Riley Dankovich

How the Government Is Tracking Your Movements | American Civil Liberties Union - 1 views

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    This article, though very clearly biased, describes the ways in which the movements of citizens are being tracked by both technology and the police. The video/information slides are obviously carried out with bias, but the information is still there. The end of the article has some interesting (helpful?) information about what the judicial system is ruling on cases involving location tracking without warrants.
mattgu123

35 per cent have upped online security following iCloud leak | Business Technology - 4 views

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    Interesting that ~35% of 1000 surveyed have upped the strength of their passwords, but only 6% turned on two-factor ID, which was a major cause of the iCloud hacks going undetected for so long.
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    It seems that two-factor authentication would not have prevented those iCloud hacks (according to this piece: http://www.tuaw.com/2014/09/02/think-iclouds-two-factor-authentication-protects-your-privacy/), but since Apple has now changed the triggers for two-factor to include things like iCloud access, two-factor will be more helpful going forward. So it is a little surprising that more people haven't enabled it.
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    I'm also reminded of the ACLU's Chris Soghoian's point (https://www.aclu.org/blog/technology-and-liberty/lessons-celebrity-icloud-photo-breach) that one reason people have crappy Apple passwords is that Apple makes you use your password so darn often. I know I get frustrated when I have to enter my (crazy long) Apple password on my iPhone just to download a free app.
Derek Bruff

How the Paris Attacks Could Lead to More Government Snooping on Americans | Mother Jones - 0 views

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    A round up of current conversations about surveillance and privacy in light of the Paris attacks.
parker718

Scorecard: How Many Rights Have Americans REALLY Lost? - 2 views

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    A breakdown of the bill of rights and how much each amendment has been given up to the government. Pretty terrifying.
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