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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Firefox for Linux will soon support Netflix and Amazon videos | PCWorld - 0 views

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    " Chris Hoffman | @chrisbhoffman Contributor, PCWorld Aug 17, 2016 5:00 AM Firefox 49 for Linux, scheduled for a September 2016 release, will add support for DRM-protected HTML5 videos. Netflix, Amazon Prime, and other streaming services will "just work" in Firefox on Linux, just as they do in Google Chrome. Encrypted media extensions come to Linux"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

MacWorld, PCWorld Kill Site Comments Because They 'Value And Welcome Feedback' | Techdirt - 0 views

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    "from the this-muzzle-shows-how-much-I-love-you dept For a while now the trend du jour in online media is to not only block your readers from making news story comments, but to insult their"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

How to install closed drivers, media codecs, and other forbidden stuff on Linux PCs | PCWorld - 0 views

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    "Linux is famous for its open-source nature, but sometimes you just need to use proprietary drivers or codecs. Here's how to do so on many of the top Linux distros."
Paul Merrell

Offline Web Apps, Dumb Idea or Really Dumb Idea? - 0 views

  • The amount of work it takes to "offline enable" a Web application is roughly similar to the amount of work it takes to "online enable" a desktop application.
  • I suspect this is the bitter truth that answers the questions asked in articles like  The Frustratingly Unfulfilled Promise of Google Gears where the author laments the lack of proliferation of offline Web applications built on Google Gears. When it first shipped I was looking forward to a platform like Google Gears but after I thought about the problem for a while, I realized that such a platform would be just as useful for "online enabling" desktop applications as it would be for "offline enabling" Web applications. Additionally, I came to the conclusion that the former is a lot more enabling to users than the latter. This is when I started becoming interested in Live Mesh as a Platform, this is one area where I think Microsoft's hearts and minds are in the right place. I want to see more applications like Outlook + RPC over HTTP  not "offline enabled" versions of Outlook Web Access.
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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Experts worry governments, 'commercial pressures' will undermine online freedom | PCWorld - 0 views

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    "Nick Mediati @dtnick Jul 5, 2014 1:32 PM e-mail print Internet experts hope the Internet has plenty of good days ahead of it, but are still worried that various factors will put a damper on the open Internet we know today. That's the takeaway of a new study from the Pew Research Center, which polled 1400 experts to gauge their views on the future of online freedom. "
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    "Nick Mediati @dtnick Jul 5, 2014 1:32 PM e-mail print Internet experts hope the Internet has plenty of good days ahead of it, but are still worried that various factors will put a damper on the open Internet we know today. That's the takeaway of a new study from the Pew Research Center, which polled 1400 experts to gauge their views on the future of online freedom. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Why prominent 'hobbyist' operating systems face an existential crisis | PCWorld - 1 views

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    "Do you think Linux is an alternative, hobbyist operating system? Ha! Linux is mainstream. If you're looking for the next niche OS, you'll need to dive deep into the cracks and crevices: passion projects worked on by a handful of developers in their spare time." [# ! #Explore… # ! #Hack… #Create… # ! … #open The W@rld to #Computing… and vice versa. # ! And the more #Open, the #Better.]
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    "Do you think Linux is an alternative, hobbyist operating system? Ha! Linux is mainstream. If you're looking for the next niche OS, you'll need to dive deep into the cracks and crevices: passion projects worked on by a handful of developers in their spare time."
Paul Merrell

PC World - Business Center: Yahoo's Zimbra Reaches for the Cloud - 0 views

  • Yahoo's Zimbra, the provider of a communications and collaboration suite that rivals Microsoft's Office and Outlook/Exchange, will make its cloud computing debut on Tuesday.Zimbra has so far relied entirely on third-party hosting partners to offer the SaaS (software-as-a-service) version of its suite.However, it is now taking advantage of Yahoo's data centers to become a hosting provider for customers in the education market that want to access the suite on demand.
Paul Merrell

Intel Could Face Civil Charges in Europe - PC World - 0 views

  • But Intel could face even more payouts if Intel competitors, such as AMD, take civil cases on the back of the Commission's regulatory action, according to Alan Davis, an expert in competition law at Pinsent Masons, the law firm behind OUT-LAW.COM. "This will open the floodgates for competitors to sue," said Davis. "There was a complainant in this case, AMD [Advanced Micro Devices], and without question they and other competitors will pursue a case for damages." "The fine goes to the European Commission's coffers, not to the competitors who suffered damage to their businesses because of Intel's anti-competitive practices," he said. "What is likely to happen is that action will be started and a massive settlement will be made."
Paul Merrell

Protocols of the Hackers of Zion? « LobeLog - 0 views

  • When Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu met with Google chairman Eric Schmidt on Tuesday afternoon, he boasted about Israel’s “robust hi-tech and cyber industries.” According to The Jerusalem Post, “Netanyahu also noted that ‘Israel was making great efforts to diversify the markets with which it is trading in the technological field.'” Just how diversified and developed Israeli hi-tech innovation has become was revealed the very next morning, when the Russian cyber-security firm Kaspersky Labs, which claims more than 400 million users internationally, announced that sophisticated spyware with the hallmarks of Israeli origin (although no country was explicitly identified) had targeted three European hotels that had been venues for negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program.
  • Wednesday’s Wall Street Journal, one of the first news sources to break the story, reported that Kaspersky itself had been hacked by malware whose code was remarkably similar to that of a virus attributed to Israel. Code-named “Duqu” because it used the letters DQ in the names of the files it created, the malware had first been detected in 2011. On Thursday, Symantec, another cyber-security firm, announced it too had discovered Duqu 2 on its global network, striking undisclosed telecommunication sites in Europe, North Africa, Hong Kong, and  Southeast Asia. It said that Duqu 2 is much more difficult to detect that its predecessor because it lives exclusively in the memory of the computers it infects, rather than writing files to a drive or disk. The original Duqu shared coding with — and was written on the same platform as — Stuxnet, the computer worm  that partially disabled enrichment centrifuges in Iranian nuclear power plants, according to a 2012 report in The New York Times. Intelligence and military experts said that Stuxnet was first tested at Dimona, a nuclear-reactor complex in the Negev desert that houses Israel’s own clandestine nuclear weapons program. While Stuxnet is widely believed to have been a joint Israeli-U.S. operation, Israel seems to have developed and implemented Duqu on its own.
  • Coding of the spyware that targeted two Swiss hotels and one in Vienna—both sites where talks were held between the P5+1 and Iran—so closely resembled that of Duqu that Kaspersky has dubbed it “Duqu 2.” A Kaspersky report contends that the new and improved Duqu would have been almost impossible to create without access to the original Duqu code. Duqu 2’s one hundred “modules” enabled the cyber attackers to commandeer infected computers, compress video feeds  (including those from hotel surveillance cameras), monitor and disrupt telephone service and Wi-Fi, and steal electronic files. The hackers’ penetration of computers used by the front desk would have allowed them to determine the room numbers of negotiators and delegation members. Duqu 2 also gave the hackers the ability to operate two-way microphones in the hotels’ elevators and control their alarm systems.
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